What a YEAR! 13 of our favorite 2013 models.

Happy New Year!!  And what a year it's been: lots of updates, new apps, and (most fun for us...) lots of models from the community!

We decided to put together a short list of 13 highlights - some of the most popular models, and others that got passed around in some @autodesk.com emails.  It was pretty difficult, there have been so many great ones!

Fruteiro by Gilberto N Borges

 

Luke-Han-Leia-Capture by Kris Smith

 

Spy vs Spy by Omar Zuniga, Arizona

 

Small Spork by Connor Weller

 

Michael vs Satan by Cory Clawson

 

The Gremlor Monster by Adam Beamish

 

Variable Insulating Cup by Maundy

 

French Quarter House by Jamie Hebert

 

Siberian dragon by Josh Smith

 

2013-10-11-20-19-52 by Federico Infanti

 

Monster Bunny Rabbit by Amanda Jackson

 

Tug Boat by Steve Harney

 

Mechanical Axe by Jefferson Manalo

 

We could make 13 more of these lists and still not get to all our favorites.  Thanks so much to everyone for using the apps and we hope you have a great New Year!

What are some you think we missed?

5 Last Minute Holiday Gifts to 3D Print

One of the greatest things about 3D printing technology is the ability to create what you want when you need it, rather than relying on traditional manufacturing routes - especially around the holidays. With Christmas only a few days away, now is the perfect time to forget about overnight shipping costs, so get your 3D printer up and running instead!

We will get you started with 10 ideas of what you can 3D print last minute for you friends and family. Just a note that included with any of these gifts should be a standard speech explaining how 3D printing works - people unfamiliar with the process find it new and fascinating!

 

 

1) You can't go wrong with a classic, customized tree ornament. This one is for 123D Make by user Brandon Cole

 

 

 

 

 

2) You can't go wrong with a bookmark for any friend that loves to read. Check out this octopus bookmark by Natalie Kendrick made using 123D Design

 

 

 

 

3) Jewelry is a great options for creating quick and personalized items for loved ones. Check out this link for tons of pendant and necklace ideas

 

 

 

 

 

4) With miniature terrariums being all the rage these days, your indoor gardening friend will appreciate the thought in adding a little personality to their little ecosystem - like the little 3D printed frog in this one

 

 

 

 

 

5) If you're dreaming of a white Christmas but there's no snow to be found, then consider celebrating with your own model of a snowman to keep the winter cheer alive, like this one by Lindsey Vandenberg

 

 

Bonus: If one of your gift recipients is blown away by your 3D design and printing prowess, be sure to send them towards our holiday deals for their very own MakerBot Replicator 2 and 123D Premium account so they can join in on the 3D printing fun as well.

We hope this list has helped to inspire you during the final countdown towards trading gifts. From all of us at Autodesk 123D, we wish you Happy Holidays and a fantastic New year.

LeWeb and the Next 10 Years

Every year thousands of folks gather in Paris, France to discuss the latest innovations coming from the world of technology at a conference called LeWeb. This year marked the 10th year of the LeWeb's operation, and as such they gave the conference a theme of "The Next 10 Years." 

3D printing was one of the major themes of the 3 day conference, with an emphasis on the maker movement and the ability for individuals to fabricate the things they want. There was consensus among the speakers that the way technology is progressing allows for consumers to use readily available software, like Autodesk 123D, and hardware like the UItimaker pictured above to design and improve the products they use. 

Mary Huang of Continuum Fashion presented her innovations in the world of combined fashion + technology. She explained the reality and the potential for people to design the things they want for themselves, without limit, and used her company's products as an example. 

It's exciting to see the subject of the 3D printing technology take its place among mainstream conversations about technology and future trends. As we look ahead towards the next 10 years the opportunities are limitless when it comes to what we can design and create for ourselves with this amazing technology.

Sketch and Text with Tinkercad

We are pleased to announce new Shape Generator capabilities available in Tinkercad!

Tinkercad offers some great shapes to help get you started, and with the introduction of Shape Generators (formerly known as ShapeScripts), the power to create is completely expanded.

Now, we don’t expect everyone to be able to create their own Shape Generator using Java Script, although we definitely encourage all of you to take a try. So in order to make Shape Generators more flexible and accessible, we added sketching capabilities using the Autodesk Creative Platform. To learn more about sketching with ACP, check out this link.

So let’s see how we can apply this to a Shape Generator. Check out our in-depth instructions below to become a Shape Generating master, and be sure to share the new shapes you create. Happy sketching!

Read more »

How a young boy is using Tinkercad to help the world see

Meet Ritik Mehta, a 13-year-old 3D printing enthusiast with a big heart.

Ritik has grown up in a world where it is possible to 3D print your dream designs at home with the help of easy-to-use 3D design software applications such as Tinkercad. Like the other kids of this 3D printing generation he’s taking the first step of many more to move towards a world where people help each other with 3D printed goodness.

Lately he has been very engaged in making his own custom glasses. This gave him the idea to provide an opportunity to everybody to own customized glasses and, at the same time, be part of a unique charity to help kids in Africa and Asia see the world as they should.

 

And just like that with the help of his father, he turned his idea into reality; so if you are in the Antwerp, Belgium area on Saturday December 21st, make sure to stop by Designcenter de Winkelhaak to see Ritik's vision come to life. Here you will be able to make your own custom glasses from the 3D design to the 3D printed model. Professional designers and 3D printing experts will assist you, and the money made from the event will go straight to ‘Eyes for the World’, an important non-profit foundation which believes that everyone, all over the world, has the right to see well.

Join us in helping Ritik show that money is no object when it comes to how 3D printing technology can benefit everyone.

3D printing video game characters: Hyperspace Madness at Autodesk University

Playing video games can be a lot of fun, and sometimes you want to bring the fun out beyond the screen: making characters from a game physically real. For Autodesk University, earlier this month, the 123D team worked closely with Autodesk's Media and Entertainment group to explore the process of 3d printing video game characters.

A member of our M&E team models the full-size Sven suit next to the 3D print display

Our Media and Entertainment group has produced a top class game called "Hyperspace Madness" to provide a compelling demo of how to use Autodesk tools to build games. We wanted to take all the various characters and models in the game, and 3D print them, in order to make a nice display at Autodesk University.

Close-up of the 3D printed display

This can be a challenge, since objects designed for a game aren't necessarily easy to print. For example, game objects are often modeled at low resolution, and rely on a color texture to make it seem convincing. The geometric modeling of the objects can cause problems too: the objects are represented as a shell with no volume, and this can cause problems with printing.

The 123D team is also about making things real, so we set out to use tools from our 123D suite to prepare some models for printing, and this is how we did it.

The game's main character, a satellite repairman called Sven, is shown in many poses to animate him while walking. We wanted to select some frames from this "walk cycle" and print them out. The first thing to do was to make sure that the character was represented as a solid: to do this we opened the files in Meshmixer, and used the Inspector tool to identify and fix any gaps that could cause problems. We wanted Sven to stand on his own, so we modeled an oval base using 123D Design, exported it as an STL file, and combined the two using Tinkercad - our entry level, browser-based design software has very powerful tools for working with meshes!

We also wanted to print Sven's antagonists: aggressive squid like creatures called the Killamari, that use robotic suits to get around. We opened the 3D model using the Autodesk 3D Print Utility, which we used to reinforce fine details that would cause problems in printing. This model was then merged with an oval base using Meshmixer.

Sven and the Killamari were printed on our Objet Connex 500 printers, which can render extremely fine detail.

The Sven walk cycle being printed

Of course, we wanted Sven and Killamari to have a place to run around in, so we also printed some of the buildings and props from the game. These were prepared for printing using a combination of tools including Autodesk 3D Print Utility and Meshmixer. Since these objects are much bigger, Type A Machines offered to print them on their Series 1 printers, which have a very large build area, and can work with innovative new materials.

Solving Xbox One Problems with Tinkercad and 3D Printing

Tinkercad user ProwlingTiger found himself facing a problem recently: he had an Xbox One Kinect, but no way to keep his new device stable, because TV mounts were sold out everywhere due to the rush of people buying the new console. Instead of going online and spending lots of money + shipping then waiting days for a hard-to-find item to arrive, ProwlingTiger made his way to Tinkercad and created what he needed instead.

Knowing other people might be having the same issue with finding a suitable mount, he shared the link to his 3D model, made for printing on a Makerbot, with Reddit, where he was quickly inundated with requests to purchase his creation. This led to him opening up an Etsy store so anyone without access to a 3D printer can buy the mount he created.

It's awesome seeing what creative folks do when faced with a problem, as well as to see how quickly other people can benefit from it. Fortunately it doesn't take lots of engineering degrees or extensive training to get to this point - as we can see below, anyone with a desire to make things will find a way to do so:

This is a great example of how 3D printing technology can make our lives a lot simpler. We look forward to seeing what ProwlingTiger and all of our other Tinkercad and 123D users will show us next.

 

123D Creations with Dazed and Confused: The Fourth and Final Installment

Here is the fourth and final installment in the collaborative Dazed and Confused series where we joined up with four world-renowned artists to see what each of their unique sets of creativity, insight and skills would create with our products. It is not often that a project this unique and amazing comes along, and we are sad that this is the last in the series.

This segment focuses on Ana Rajcevic. Ana is an award-winning fashion artist whose work spans sculpture and fashion design. A constant theme in her work is the transformation of the human body through complex adornments or body-sculptures. She seeks to exhibit the duality of "fashion artefacts" in he artwork, and the final result of her 123D creation exhibits the "mutation and evolution" of her creative practice. 

Using 123D Catch Ana designed an insect-inspired hairlike facade, 800 hairs to be precise, to a hand-sculpted life-size headpiece. These hairs were too fine to be crafted without the use of technology, but were no problem for 123D Catch, so they were 3D printed. Despite the riskiness of the project and the challenges faced by the 3D printers in bringing the sculpture to life, "the look on Ana's face when she admires her 'artificial exoskeleton' catching the light in her studio is proof positive of the power of 3D printing to astound even a seasoned professional in materials design."

Check out the video below for more details

 

 

It has been a wonderful and rewarding experience seeing what these four talented artists can do when handed the reins to 3D printing technology by Autodesk 123D, and we are excited to see how this project inspired our other 123D users in their approach to 3D design and art.

Better 3D model previews with new 123D viewer

The 123D team is constantly innovating to improve the experience for you, our users. Since we are all about 3D creation, it is important for us to help you experience 3D models in the best possible way, and that includes the 123D 3D viewer, embedded in all the 123D gallery model pages. We've just made some big improvements so that you can see faster and better 3d model previews, and I want to share them with you!

We recently launched a new version of our 123D Catch scanning app, which features a 3D gallery as a key part of the user experience. In order to make that possible, we worked really hard at creating very efficient ways of downloading 3D models in order to make it much faster. We've now brought those improvements to the website, to a 123D viewer that you can use to browse our gallery, or even embed in other sites.

We've added the Autodesk view cube to help you navigate. You'll notice that navigation has been changed too: left-mouse drag now orbits the model, and right-click drag lets you reposition it. (If you need help, click on the little question mark icon in the bottom right.)

However, the most significant improvement has to do with how quickly models load: up to 50% faster than before, and you can see the model loading before your eyes. But don't take my word for it: try it out below by clicking the 3D view icon below the image in the embedded viewer below, or by browsing other models in the 123D Gallery:

 

12 Days of Printing with GROWit – Tinkercad Challenge

GROWit has challenged you to create a holiday ornament or decoration design using Tinkercad for the chance to win a print!  Enter between December 6th - 17th - find out more here.

 How to Enter:

  1. Using Tinkercad, create your best holiday inspired decoration (could be an ornament, a figurine, stocking hook…your possibilities are endless, so show us your best!)  
  2. - Send your file to contests@growit3d.com
  3. - Title your submission: “12 Days of Printing – Your Name”
  4. - Include your name, shipping address and phone number
  5. - Take a screenshot of your design and share it with friends – Don’t forget to include the hashtag #12daysofprinting and tag @GROWit3D
  6. - Accepted file formats are: .stl
     

December 6th-17th – Submission period

December 20th – Design shipped – Just in time for Christmas!

Rules:

  • All entries must be created using Tinkercad
  • Entries can be submitted daily until December 17th, 2013 11:59PM PST
  • Multiple entries are accepted
  • Bounding box of design should be no bigger than: 4 in x 4 in x 4 in
  • Minimum wall thickness on designs: 0.04”
  • Winner(s) will be chosen by the GROWit selection team
  • Winner(s) will be announced Thursday December 19th, 2013
     

Prizes:

  1. The designer(s) of the best holiday inspired ornament will win their own 3D printed design with features on the GROWit blog and social media channels!
  2. Winning designs will be sold in the GROWit store with recognition to the designer.
  3. 10% of all sales will be awarded to the winning designers for sales through December 31, 2013

Terms and Conditions:

  • By submitting an entry (which includes a 3D file, pictures and text description) to GROWit, you grant a non-exclusive, royalty free, unlimited in the time, worldwide license to GROWit to display the design you submitted and/or a reproduction of this design for any purposes. GROWit has the right to reproduce in 3D, sell reproductions of model, take photographs/pictures and reproduce the pictures of the design on any support (CD, DVD, internet, folder, etc.) for GROWit purposes. By submitting your design to the challenge, you state that you are the sole creator of the model and that you do not infringe any copyright or any other intellectual property right (trademark, design and mode, patent, etc.) of a third party and/or that you obtained all the necessary permissions in order to duly allow such a license to GROWit.
  • All entries must be unique and never 3D printed before.
  • All entries must be created on Tinkercad.com
  • GROWit reserves the right to amend these rules at any time.
  • Prizes must be accepted as awarded. No cash alternatives or substitutes will be allowed. The decision of the jury will be final.

12 Days of Printing - Official Rules PDF

 
  • Page 1 of 2
  • 1
  • 2
  • >