How-To’s & Free 3D Models for Arduino’s 10th Birthday. #ArduinoD14

Arduino Day


Let’s celebrate Arduino’s 10th anniversary with some pointers on getting started with an Arduino compatible board in 123D Circuits, and a handful of free 3D models from the 123D Gallery.

In case you didn't already know: 123D Circuits is the newest addition to the 123D family of apps. One of it's finest attributes is the ability to simulate an Arduino in your browser without having to touch (ahem... blow up) any hardware. Yes, you can design circuit boards in 123D Circuits and they'll automagically arrive at your door in 10-12 days, but we're here now because we love Arduino boards and we have a few Instructables already written to get you going with an Arduino in 123D Circuits HERE and HERE.

Example circuit, press the PLAY button in the upper right hand corner to see it ping-pong with LEDs.

 

Do you already know all about Arduino? Then head on over to the Instructables Arduino contest There's still time to submit an entry. Wondering what other people are working on? People like you just voted for the winners of the 123D Circuits contest on Instructables.



If you'd like to 3D print a case look no further; the 123D Gallery is full of 3D models of various Arduino board enclosures and useful parts.  These are great 3D Models to 3D Print as-is or modify with one of our apps like MeshMixer or Tinkercad.  You can download them for free to use in your own projects!

Arduino compatible boards and other parts

Arduino Uno R3Arduino ProtoshieldBreadboardArduino Bot Platform


Cases

Arduino DiecimilaArduino LilypadArduino Due CaseArduino Extreme (Uno) Case


Cases, Bumpers, Misc.

Arduino Uno BumperTall Arduino Uno CaseArduino Galileo mountStepper Motor Driver Board

Note: Here is a complete list of Arduino-related models (100+ pcs.) found in 123D Gallery. Some models mentioned in this post are from the Premium 123D collection, however even Free 123D membership owners can download up to 10 premium models per month! 


3D print these models

Follow below steps to print these Arduino-related models on your 3D printer:

  1. Download a model of your choice by clicking on any one of the "Download model (.stl)" links found on the model pages.
  2. Download Meshmixer, a free, powerful tool from Autodesk to work with 3D models. Go to Meshmixer page for more info.
  3. Print model after setting it up and refining it in Meshmixer.

 


Register for free to download these, and many more 3D models:

Register now

3D Hubs + Autodesk 123D = Party Time (And Workshop)

 

 

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Party Time

 

Hello 3D printing community in and around San Francisco! On behalf of both Autodesk and 3D Hubs, we’d like to cordially invite you to join a free mixer we will be hosting at our Gallery in downtown San Francisco. 

Mixer Date and Venue

Autodesk Gallery at One Market

1 Market St #200, San Francisco

Friday, April 11th, 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

 

We will be welcoming an exciting panel of guest speakers to this event (see below), all speaking on design applications in 3D printing, and representing the industries of industrial design, architecture, the arts, the internet, 3D printer design, and more! Come learn more about Autodesk 123D and 3D printing services offered by 3D Hubs.

For those of you who don’t know, 3D Hubs is a great way to crowdsource local 3D printers, giving you easy access to 3D printing. Learn more about them here, and at our Mixer and Workshop events!

There will be free bites, soda, local craft beer, and even a raffle. Please register here to reserve your ticket to the Mixer and place entry into the raffle. Note that space is limited and we will be checking registration at the door.

For our more hands-on friends, check out our Workshop earlier in the day to learn more about 3D printing! You can register for the Workshop here

Workshop Date and Venue

Autodesk Gallery at One Market

1 Market St #200, San Francisco

Friday, April 11th, 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm 

We look forward to seeing you there!

 

123D Circuits Contest Winners!

 

You may have seen our blog post a few weeks back about the 123D Circuits contest on Instructables. Well the contest is over now, and after a whopping 222 entries we were able to select a few entrants that really went above and beyond with their projects, so we could shower them with all sorts of fancy, electronics-related gifts. Not to mention these sweet customized multi-purpose knives!

 

It was really inspiring to see your creativity in the circuits world. From robots to medical devices to things that were just plain practical, you did it all. While everyone contributed an amazing project, we are happy to announce the winners for each category!

You can find the rest of the winners here.

If you missed out on this contest, have no fear - there are lots of chances to win things. We have a Create Your Own Drone contest going right now in partnership with i.materialise, and for you circuits lovers there's also an awesome Arduino contest running on Instructables as well. 

HIGHFIV3D: Autonomous Reassurance Device – Part 2

(I only had a small speaker on hand, please forgive the audio)

I started working on the electronics component to the HighFiv3D machine this week. In my previous post, I went from using a piezo senseor to an accelerometer; then this week I decided to do a tilt sensor before getting frustrated trying to debounce it. So ACCELEROMETER it is...!

The first step was gathering parts. After a bit of advice from Gian Pablo and Rob, I figured I'd need an Arduino Uno, a Wave Shield and the accelerometer to start. We have some Arduinos on hand at Pier 9, but you can get everything from Adafruit, retailing for about $60.

The Wave Shield is basically another circuit board that sits directly on top of an Ardiuno and allows for .wav files to be played from an SD card. Now I can record the audio with my laptop, convert to the proper file type (.wav) and store them on an SD card for random play when prompted; in this case, when the accelerometer is moved.

I used Adafruit's Wave Shield Kit, v.1.1, for which they have a great tutorial on soldering and building the actual board. If you can solder, it's very simple. You'll need a 2GB SD card (it can't use anything larger) that is formatted - I used the SD formatter that Adafruit suggested, but Mac's Disk Utility will work. Once the board was built per the instructions, I only added some female headers to make testing easier.

For the accelerometer, the only soldering that's required is the wire leads that will run from the Arduino to the Shield/Arduino. I chose Yellow/Blue/Red for my X,Y and Z motions, black for power and green for ground (my electronics aptitude has been dictated by motorcycle wiring). Just leave a foot or so of wire slack to test the sensor.


Once the shield was finished, I started working on the coding. My programming experience is pretty limited (I once made a light blink with an Arduino, but that's about it). Fortunately, there is a HUGE community with pre-written codes (Sketches), so you can get away with not having to completely write it yourself. I pulled from Adafruit's example sketches for the Wave Shield and the accelerometer. The Arduino forums are a good resource too. But, since I sit next to him, I asked Gian Pablo to help me with the shield code first.

From Gian Pablo:

The great thing about using the Arduino for DIY projects is that it is so widely used that you can almost always find an example or project that to get you started. For this project, we used the WaveShield from Adafruit (https://www.adafruit.com/products/94) to provide audio output. It is a simple Arduino shield with an SD card slot and audio output. We connected an accelerometer, an ADXL335 on a breakout board.

For programming, we just used one of the examples from Adafruit as a starting point, in this case the Play6_HC example (http://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-wave-shield-audio-shield-for-arduino/play6-hc). We wanted to modify it so that instead of reading a button press to trigger the audio response, it would respond to sudden motion of the accelerometer, and allow for some time for the hand to settle down each time (if someone gave it a good whack). This only required 3 lines of code, and then we had to make some slight changes to the rest of the program so that it would choose a random response each time.

After a couple of hours we were good to go!

The only .wav files I had on hand were from Star Wars and Nacho Libre (don't ask), so I put them on the SD card, followed some directions, and voila... my little shield was talking to me. Incessantly.

Then, with the accelerometer tuned in - I was eventually able to activate random files by hitting the sensor. I was frustrated for 2 days because I kept getting an error, but we eventually realized that the file names were too long!! With just the shield, the file names didn't matter, it just played whatever is on the card. However, with the accelerometer and randomization, the same files wouldn't play because they were over 8 characters. Once I abbreviated them, it would play perfectly.

 

 

Meet the Meshmixer band – musical mashups made easy

Meshmixer really is the ultimate tool for remixing 3D models. In order to learn about some of the new features that have been added, the 123D team got together to jam. We made some musical mashups based on remixes of 3D models from our gallery - and we'd love to share with you how we did it.

We made five different band members, using different techniques. From left to right: Beethoven Mechaspider, the Elefan, Guitar Golem, Keytar Kritter and Horndog.

The Mechaspider combines a model created in 123D Design, the Mechanical Tarantula, with a scan created with 123D Catch, Beethoven's head. We used the new Make Solid feature in Meshmixer to turn the spider model into a single unified part. You can adjust the resolution and accuracy of this operation until you get something that works. We added the model of Beethoven to the same project, and used the Inspector feature to close any gaps. Finally, we positioned the head using the Transform tool, and used the Boolean Union operation to join everything together. 

The Elefan started off with the Elephant Conductor model from the 123D Content Library, which is perched on a music box base. The Plane Cut function sliced off the base. Then we added a Hook'em Horns Hand, used Mirror to get two of them, and used Transform to size them and position them appropriately. Finally, selecting hands and body, and applying a Boolean Union pulled it all together.

Guitar Golem starts with the Wood Golem and the Guitar Antenna topper, both from the 123D Content Library. The first order of business was to load both models into Meshmixer, and size them correctly relative to each other. The guitar has a cylindrical fitting that we don't need, so we used Select mode in Meshmixer to select and delete. We needed to pose the Golem so we used one of the hot new features in Meshmixer - the Soft Transform. First select the parts of the limb that we want to move, then choose Deform -> Soft Transform, and select the Non-Linear option. This treats the boundary between the selection and the body as if it were rubber, and makes for a really nice way to pose models.

Keytar Kritter is based on the Metal Golem and the Keytar. Once again, the new Make Solid tool was key to make the Keytar into a single solid piece. Soft Transform came in handy to pose the Golem, adjusting both the arm position and the fingers to make it look like he is really rocking out.

Finally, Horndog starts with the Ghostbusters Terror Dog made in 123D Creature, combined with the Tambourine around its neck and the Bugle for ears. We used Make Solid and Boolean Union as before (see a pattern?) but then applied a major new feature. The Tambourine and the Bugle have very fine details that would not print well, so we went to the new 3D Print area in Meshmixer, and used the Adaptive Thickening option to make sure that there were no details less than 2mm in size.

All the models were printed on our fancy Objet 3D printers here at 123D secret headquarters, but the advanced support options in Meshmixer will let you print on a Makerbot or other affordable printers. Give Meshmixer a try - it's free, and should be an essential part of your toolbox if you're doing anything with 3D printing!

Meshmixer Update!: Your 3D Printing Sidekick Adds Patterning and More

Well, it's only been about a month since the last update to Autodesk Meshmixer, which included more powerful 3D printing workflows. Today, Autodesk Meshmixer updated again with the 3D printing workflows you requested, many general enhancements, and a few surprises.

Autodesk Meshmixer Update

 

We are having a lot of fun playing with the newly added "Make Pattern" tool and 3D printing the results. Make Pattern lets you create a unique cage-like structure that conforms to an objects surface (like below) and more. 

3D Patterned Objects

Examples of objects patterned in Meshmixer

 

As for the 3D printing additions, one highlight is the support for assigning multiple materials (for printers that feature multiple material prints). For example, you can now assign what objects are assigned to the Left/Right extruder for your Makerbot Replicator 2X. Here is a print I made with 2 materials on an Objet Connex 500. It is a 123D Catch capture of Autodesk's CEO Carl Bass in Vero Clear combined with the Autodesk brand "A" in Vero White. This was stylized and prepared for the Objet printer all in Meshmixer, then printed all in one go!

Multi-material 3D print

This is a multi-material print I created in Meshmixer and printed to a Objet Connex 500

 

Last but not least, thank you for all of your feedback on Autodesk Meshmixer, and please keep it coming! Due to growing popularity of this free app, we are looking to make more regular updates so you can continue to push the limits of your 3D printing amazingness. So, if you would like to give us praise or even scold us, send any feedback to meshmixer@autodesk.com.

Monday Makers: MakerKids

MakerKIds CAD'ing it up at SXSW Create

 

This past weekend at SXSW I had the great fortune to hang out with the amazing group of individuals from MakerKids. One of the few and only existing Maker Spaces designed just for kids, MakerKids was started with a magic that the only the Maker Movement can provide. Started in 2010 in co-founder Andrew Forest's garage, MakerKids has grown into a world class space for kids to get hands on experience with 3D Printing, programming, electronics, woodworking, sewing and crafting. 

Co-founder Jennifer Turliuk Showing off her 3D printed un-reality glasses

 

At SXSW's Create space, MakerKids ran an amazing program showing youth how to model in TinkerCAD, and then 3D print live on location with a Cube 3D printer. The few that I witnessed were overjoyed and thrilled to be able to create something cool and then 3D print it. Co-Executive Director and Chief Happiness Officer Jennifer Turliuk walked me around the space and even let me assist a bit. I strongly encourage anyone looking into starting a space geared towards kids to check out the amazing work done at MakerKids. 

Tinkering away with MakerKids

DIY Sound Circuit Comes To Life

New Orleans has Mardi Gras, Austin has SXSW, and here at the123D HQ we’re getting into the groove with our new musical theme: #LISTEN3D

One of the projects we’ve been working on is a theremin-like circuit that makes cool, R2-D2 style sounds that change pitch based on how much light it detects.  Move your hand in front of it, the sounds change - it's super easy to build and tweak! Twist or press a button and the sounds change even more! 


 Here's another video of the same circuit hooked up to an Oscilloscope.

This circuit is inspired by the designs in Nicolas Collins’ book Handmade electronic Music and you can build your own based off the plans right here in 123D Circuits. Nicholas Collins is “a pioneer in the use of microcomputers in live performance, and has made extensive use of 'home-made' electronic circuitry, radio, found sound material, and transformed musical instruments.” 


Update: We used 123D Circuits to turn the hands-on breadboard into a real, professional printed circuit board.  Here's a blog post on it.

 

 

 

15 Free 3D Furniture Models for Your Architectural Projects (Part 1)

I came across quite a few excellent 3D models of various furniture items while planning my architectural project which, I thought, once 3D printed would breathe in extra realism to my model. This post will highlight some of my favorites - you can download them for free to use in your own projects!

Note: Here is a complete list of furniture-related models (1664+ pcs.) found in 123D Gallery. Models mentioned in this post are from the Premium 123D collection, however even Free 123D membership owners can download up to 10 premium models per month. Stay tuned for part 2 which will include both premium and free furniture items!

Tan Lounge Chair

Download model (.stl) | Convert to other 3D file formats


Captains Chair

Download model (.stl) | Convert to other 3D file formats


Cabinet

Download model (.stl) | Convert to other 3D file formats


Executive Chair

Download model (.stl) | Convert to other 3D file formats


Leather Recliner

Download model (.stl) | Convert to other 3D file formats


Open Patio Umbrella

Download model (.stl) | Convert to other 3D file formats


Sectional Sofa

Download model (.stl) | Convert to other 3D file formats


Sofa Pillows

Download model (.stl) | Convert to other 3D file formats


Swing

Download model (.stl) | Convert to other 3D file formats


Bath Towel

Download model (.stl) | Convert to other 3D file formats


King Size Bed

Download model (.stl) | Convert to other 3D file formats


Traditional Sofa

Download model (.stl) | Convert to other 3D file formats


Armchair 4

Download model (.stl) | Convert to other 3D file formats


Picnic Table Octagon

Download model (.stl) | Convert to other 3D file formats


Patio Lounge Chair - Padded

Download model (.stl) | Convert to other 3D file formats


3D print these models

Follow below steps to print these furniture pieces on your 3D printer:

  1. Download a model of your choice by clicking on any one of the "Download model (.stl)" links found under model images.
  2. Download Meshmixer, a free, powerful tool from Autodesk to work with 3D models. Go to Meshmixer page for more info.
  3. Print model after setting it up and refining it in Meshmixer.

Optional: paint your models with basic acrylic paints, which could be found at any art supply store. Seen above is my quick paint test of the "Tan Lounge Chair".


Register for free to download these, and many more 3D models:

Register now

HIGHFIV3D: Autonomous Reassurance Device – Part 1

During the month of March, there are a few different music-themed things happening: SXSW and more festivals you can shake a stick at (it's even Music in our Schools Month!), so we're thinking about sound and music here at 123D. There are tons of great related models in the 123D gallery that we'll be remixing and playing with for the next few weeks, and a couple of us will be focusing on sound-related projects using 123D Circuits - look for #LISTEN3D 

As an at-best-novice with electronics, I decided to step lightly and integrate Circuits with some other projects I've been wanting to try. The first is, naturally, a High-Five machine.  While it has nothing to do with music, per se, I think I'll learn a lot about the audio/electronics side and 123D Circuits.

The idea is this: a free-standing hand that you can interact with for a bit of reassurance when walking to get a cup of coffee.  When you give it a healthy palm smack, it will generate some positive words of encouragement - think "You're Awesome!" or "Oh Yeah!".  Within a cardboard-stacked hand, a sensor would register impact and trigger the audio. My first thought was a Piezo sensor in the hand, but after some words of wisdom (and a high-five) I decided to go with an accelerometer that would determine when the hand was moved, thus activating the audio output.

The Mona Lisa started out on notebook paper, btw.

The first step is building the physical hand and then we'll figure out how the passerby will interact with it - table mounted seems the easiest, but wall-mounted would be a little cooler.  I considered using 123D Catch to create a model of my own hand and arm, but while messing around on 123D Creature, I found a really great model by Mark Dollar!  It's a bit cartoonish and big, so it should be perfect.

 

 

I downloaded the model and opened it in MeshMixer to open up the fingers a bit more for a proper high-five.  Then took it into Tinkercad to work on the cut out.  I think a 1" dowel is a fine way to make the 'arm'.  I also made a little hollow for the accelerometer.  

 

Once I was happy with the cutout, it was on to 123D Make to generate the slices for the laser cutter.  I wanted to keep it close to human scale, so I made it about 9" tall.  Once cut, the only tedious bit was the fingers (hopefully they'll withstand some trauma).  

 

 

Now I need to go shopping, look for next steps and more Sound & Music posts soon.

 

 
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