Maker of the Day – Domenic di Giorgio (Day 31)

 

 

Domenic di Giorgio

Why I make

When I look at something that interests me my first thought is always  "How could I make that?"

It becomes a challenge and an exciting chance to learn something. A new technique or material or technology.

Recently I have become obsessed with making tools to help makers make more. In particular a low-cost laser cutter/engraver. I enjoy watching makers take tools and use them in ways they were never imagined to be used in.

Very inspiring.

 

What I make

These days with the tools we (makers) have available to us, I can say that I make "Whatever I want to" 

I started making gliders and planes out of balsa and tissue paper when I was young and my need to make things grew and grew.. Now I use composite materials, cnc machines, 3d printers and laser cutters! Times and technology may have changed, but the feeling of having made something from start to finish never changes. 

I enjoy experimenting with cad, electronics, programming, robotics as well as getting my hands dirty on a lathe or mill.

I make things that capture my interests. 3d printed arduino controlled robotic arms, useless-machines in Pringles cans, tools to help me make more things. 

Too much to make and just not enough time!

 

 

Maker of the Day – Timothy Englert (Day 30)

 

 

Timothy Englert

Why I make

We are a society increasingly distancing itself from actual hands-on making of objects.  When I was a boy, everyone took shop class, and made a box, a bread basket, a cutting board, or a pencil holder as their first piece.  Our great-randfathers built their own homes, and a toolbox was as indispensable then as a computer is now.  

 The Knickerbocker Bench is my effort to reconnect people with the simple beauty of a handmade object, one that they can sometimes participate in the making of a permanent installation at a park.  I make them for private sale, but I also make them with groups of people, using traditional tools like two-man saws, hand planes, and scraper blades alongside band saw and chain saw mills.  Log benches connect us to the earth in an unique way, and the Knickerbocker Bench is as much an invitation to slow down and appreciate the beauty that surrounds us as it is a functional and durable piece of furniture.  I make them because people respond to them, and I make them because they remind me of the curious and indispensable role that trees play as the lungs of the world.  There's lots of other reasons, but these are a few.

What I make

I make the Knickerbocker Bench.  I created it in 2007 as a gift to one of New York's many beautiful state parks to recognize the natural ice harvesting industry that once took place at the site.  The design is a 21st Century homage to mankind's first piece of furniture, the log bench.   I've made them in a variety of woods, most of them coming from reclaimed logs found in the woods or from tree services.  Since the first ones were made for the ruins of the ice houses, we've since made just under 100 more, most of them in parks or on trails in the Hudson Valley, but some also in the midwest.  As no two trees are alike, no two Knickerbocker Benches are the same, as well.  

 

 

Maker of the Day – Gerry Paquette (Day 29)

 

 

Gerry Paquette

Why I make

I teach board game design in a Game Development program at Algonquin college in Ottawa. The college Print Shop recently invested in 3D printers and I encourage my students to make use of it by creating custom bits for their games. As first-year students, most of them haven't had any training using 3D software. Tinkercad is the ideal entry-level tool that does not overwhelm it's users with options. In fact, limited options allows for a more creative approach to design. 

Once the students have sent me their models in .STL format, I'm able to preview them in Tinkercad and make modifications in terms of sizing and thickening elements that are likely to break before sending them on to be printed. 

What I make

I use Tinkercad to make custom board game components primarily. Recently I used it to create a flea circus as part of my costume for local Steampunk 5 year anniversary gala. 

My current project, Battle Cubed, is a tactical 3- dimensional space fighting game that features 3D printed ships and a 2D stand with platforms that are laser cut out of acrylic and assembled into a 3-tiered playing surface.

 

 

Maker of the Day – Emmanuel Di Giacomo (Day 28)

 

 

Emmanuel Di Giacomo

Why I make

I am an Architect by training and I have always been crazy of Utopy in Architecture. I was also a former alumni of Paul Maymont, a famous French Architect and Utopist of the 60ies.I designed and drew my first architectural creations when I was 15. The Story became even stronger when I used my first 3D Software in 1989 on a Mac. I then fell in love with Revit and decided to continue the Utopic Story by giving life to the Utopic City. 

What I make

I design and create a Revit Utopic City in 3D based on the map of famous cities like Roma and Milan. It's made of hundreds of crazy and nice buildings and infrastructures, a completely imaginary and complex world that more than 93,600 Facebook lovers follow in the world. It allows also to show the creative power of a BIM tool like Revit.

 

 

Maker of the Day – Scott Kildall (Day 27)

 

 

Scott Kildall

Why I make

Creative energy sustains me and by making physical things, I transform thoughts into form. I view new technologies as an opportunity to experiment with possibilities that is completely new, but pays homage to older traditions. 

The data crystals reflect this transformation from virtual into material using technology that wasn't available 10 years ago.

What I make

Data Crystals are a series of 3D-printed sculptures, which I generate algorithmically from various data sources. These manifest a vision of what data physically looks like — one possibility for 3D data visualization.

My source for the data crystals range from city-provided open datasets such as construction permit and crime statistics to biometric data generated by human bodies such as physical movement or EEG (brainwaves) data. 

I see data as sculptural material, like clay, plaster or steel. By using code to transform columns of numbers into 3D models, I call myself a “data miner,” where I extract data into small gems. I’m still experimenting with legibility and aesthetics. The primary question that drives this work is the question of “what does data look like?” 

 

 

Maker of the Day – Max Gunawan (Day 26)

 

 

Max Gunawan

Why I make

Inspired by the idea of an illuminated book, it is designed to have intuitive functionality. Simply open the cover to turn it on, the further you open the cover the brighter it gets. It packs eight hours of rechargeable battery life and can be easily recharged through a micro USB port. 

Lumio is the first product from a studio dedicated to helping people live large with less. The studio is focused on simple, multi-functional, everyday objects that are simple, intuitive and beautiful.
The Lumio brand creates modern lighting systems with the simple goal of giving people the freedom to experience beautiful lighting wherever they are.

What I make

Lumio is a modern portable lamp that unfolds from a book and can be transformed into multiple forms and functions. It has a minimalist design that combines laser-cut wood cover with durable water resistant Tyvek pages containing high performing LED. With a unique combination of transformable shape and concealed Neodymium magnets, you can personalize Lumio into endless configurations and mount it on almost any surface. Lumio provides you with an elegant lighting solution whether you're throwing an impromptu backyard party or reading a bedtime story to your kids. 

 

 Max is a TechShop user! Find out more about Lumio here.

 

Maker of the Day – Andy Lee (Day 25)

 

 

Andy Lee

Why I make

I've always made stuff. It's an exploration i've been on for a long time. I am interested in how everything is made. All things from how is steel forged to how are silicone etched and packaged or how does a designer decide what the visual details they might add to their products.

Making stuff leads me on these journeys where I discover new ways that things can be made and built. 

What I make

Most of the things I make are tools for living. I've made lines of furniture and household accessories. I've been interested in robotics for a long time. In 2008 I made my own 3D printer in my apartment on my kitchen table. Everyone asked if they needed 3D goggles.

I made a chess board that had a gantry with a magnet underneath the board. It could adjust the magnet and move the pieces around. There was an RFID reader which could read tags that we placed in the base of the pieces. 

Right now I am exploring aperiodic stacking patterns of polyhedrons.

See more of Andy's work at http://5cell.net/

 

Maker of the Day – Benjamin Delman (Day 24)

 

 

Benjamin Delman

Why I make

Making has found its way into all aspects of my life long ago. Whether that was building my first computer from parts, rebuilding a carburetor on a motor, deviating from a recipe in the kitchen, or building a website. I've found making something myself to be incredibly rewarding.

Naturally, when it came to giving gifts, I wanted to include that DIY attitude. Sometimes that was making the gift itself. This past December, it was just a small piece of the packaging. In all scenarios, it added that custom, personalized touch that leaves a lasting impression. 

What I make

December 2013, I had been taking a handful of classes at Autodesk's Pier 9. Rather than buying some gift tags off the shelf, I took the opportunity to use the laser cutters again and make my own. I found some Christmas themed vector art online, imported it into Illustrator, and tweaked it to fit the gift tag outline I had drawn. After adding some recipient names, these custom gift tags were ready to attach to a gift box with a little ribbon. 

 

 

Maker of the Day – Peter Hudson (Day 23)

A man of few words but many talents, Peter Hudson is a maker you don't want to miss.

 

Peter Hudson

Why I make

For a sense of community and purpose. 

What I make

Large scale, interactive 3D stroboscopic zoetropes 

 

Meshmixer 2.4: Collect the Gold, Silver, AND Bronze

 

Autodesk Meshmixer 2.4

Autodesk continued the full court press on 3D printing today with the release of Meshmixer 2.4. Most notable with this release is the integration of direct printing to popular 3D printing services: i.materialise, Sculpteo, and Shapeways. 

The integration of the printing services within the 3D printing section now allows you to print in nearly any material including food safe ceramic, jewelry quality gold and silver, and the lower costing plastics and polyamides in different solid colors to name a few. The pricing is interactive, so one can easily size up a model with the material of their choice and get an instant quote from the printing service within Meshmixer. Making the object smaller will make the 3D print less expensive, which makes it easy to bargain for how much you want to pay to see your creation made real. See the video below for a quick workflow of healing a 123D Catch capture for 3D printing in a silver material with a 3D printing service. A new playlist of videos here, called Meshmixer 101 will get you up to speed with the basics of working in Meshmixer.

 

Creating, editing and printing to any 3D printer is a breeze, especially if you have a Type A Machines "2014 Series 1" printer. Meshmixer can send prints directly to your networked 2014 Series 1 3D printer, eliminating the need to fumble around with memory cards. Thanks to the folks at Type A Machines for their collaboration!!

 Meshmixer Patterned Logo with Bunnies

 

Meshmixer also adds some powerful new Patterning techniques with this release, examples shown above, which creates a border based on FaceGroups. We've been having a lot of fun with this new technique to easily create variations of existing models in our library....CHECK IT OUT!