MeshMixer 101: Move Objects (with snapping

The Meshmixer 101 playlist is a series of videos to get you up and running with Meshmixer - allowing you to easier manipulate and edit mesh models. 

Building off of the "Move Objects" video, this will show you how to move and rotate objects around with snapping constraints for more precision.

Bryan Allen Will Decimate Your World

You may have seen a new trend in fashion and design: the angular, panelized look.  If you've ever wondered how that's done then read on!  Featured 123D user Bryan Allen has written this instructable on how to do it with 123D Make.  Check out Bryan's decimated chess pieces below, and download the full set on 123Dapp.com.

Bryan Allen is a prolific maker with serious design and 3D printing chops.  He's founding partner in Smith/Allen Design Studio and is the Chief Design Officer over at Type A Machines, a San Francisco based 3D printer company.


While working with Bryan on integrating the Type A 3D Printers into Autodesk MeshMixer we gave him a sneak peak into a new feature for 123D Make: the ability to easily panelize (or "decimate") a 3D model and export it for 3D printing.  Bryan took off and ran with it - and he's written this Instructable on how it's done.  Not only is 123D Make free, but so are tens of thousands of 3D models in our gallery.  So what are you waiting for?  Check out Bryan's InstructableDownload 123D Make and try it yourself.

Here's another example of some models standing next to their 123D Make-decimated counterparts:

What do you want to decimate?  With Autodesk's free design and fabrication tools and Bryan's instructions the possibilities are endless.  Thanks Bryan!

 

PINHOL3D: 3D printing through a new lens

 

The inspiration for my first project stems from a deep-rooted love for iPhone photography. While a number of phone apps exist for the sole purpose of photo manipulation, there are comparatively few hardware accessories that serve the same purpose. Recalling my days of haphazardly taping a pinholed-cardboard square to my iPhone camera, I envisioned my first 3D printing project achieving that same grainy, vignetting effect in hardware form. Enter my first project: the iPhone pinhole camera.

freshly-printed iPhone pinholes

My first attempt at the iPhone pinhole was only minorly successful. I modeled the device on Tinkercad, essentially slicing off two-thirds of an already-created iPhone 5 case, and adding a cylinder with a small opening over the camera area to create the pinhole. This took all of twenty minutes; it’s that easy.

I then printed it on one of the many Objet500 printers here at Pier 9, using the Tango Black material. While the produced model was workable, the material was too flimsy to comfortably sit on the iPhone. Moreover, the pinhole was slightly too far to the left and needed to be manually adjusted for each picture.

Thus, I returned to the drawing board (that is, Tinkercad). This time, I used iPhone specs detailed in Apple’s developer guide to locate the center of the camera. Using Tinkercad’s ruler feature, I easily plugged in the specified measurements and there it was — a complete second iteration in less than half an hour. Total insanity.

Honestly, the longest part of this process was waiting for a fellow Pier 9 shop user’s piece to finish printing so I could load my creation onto the Objet500. But after a mere hour of watching the printer lay down layer upon layer of model material, there it was — the material version of an idea that I’d conceived of 24 hours before this moment.

Excavating the model from its support materialHot off the object

Despite my immediate urge to test it out, I needed to dislodge the piece from its support material encasing — a process that I greatly underestimated. After half an hour of chiseling away at the support material with a power washer and a variety of ice-pick-resembling hand tools, there was my glistening iPhone pinhole camera.

So here — directly from my new pinhole camera to your screen — is the world of an Autodesk intern through a Tinkercad-created lens:

I also modeled a number of iterations, experimenting with the depth of the pinhole casing as well as the number and orientation of pinholes. Follow my instructable, print your own, and play around with your pinhole images on Pixlr for extra vintage-looking, instagram-able results.

 

A BEAM Robot Comes To Life

"BEAM" is an acronym for Biology, Electronics, Aesthetics, and Mechanics.  I know... it's a mouthful, and it's not the first time we've brought it up.  In our first blog post about the BEAM Robot it was based on this interactive simulation we'd built in 123D Circuits.


We've since fleshed it out, including CNC-milling our own PCB with a sweet Othermill and adding 3D printed parts we designed in Tinkercad.

This BEAM is a phototrope (it reacts to light, seeking brightness).  We shot these videos under pretty bright lighting so the robot tends to drive straight off the counter top, but trust us when we say it's seeking out light and it's little limit-switch bumpers help it navigate obstacles.

 

The BEAM Robot running wild. 


Here it is before the motors and "legs" were added.  Notice how the "eyes" signal that it's reacting to different levels of light as a shadow is cast over it.  The finished robot drives by varying the voltage across the motors depending on how much light it detects on either it's left or right side.

BEAM Robot's circuitry reacting to light and shadow.

 Want the real nitty gritty?  Keep reading. Read more »

Innovation in 3D Printing Powered by Autodesk

With products ranging from stem cells, shoes and mini-statues, 3D printing has started to boom in China amid the industry's rapid development worldwide, and this was showcased at the 2014 World 3D Printing Technology Industry Conference held on June 19-22, in Qingdao, Shandong Province. This event is co-organized by the World 3D Printing Technology Industry Alliance, the China 3D Printing Technology Industry Alliance, the Asian Manufacturing Association, and the Qingdao municipal government. 

Autodesk sees an opportunity---and need---to speed the pace of innovation in the 3D printing industry. Standing at the frontier of 3D printing technology, we want to help make 3D printing accessible to millions of Chinese people by lowering existing barriers to entry and providing leading applications. The Autodesk 123D Shanghai team set up a promising booth at the aforementioned event and introduced all of our 123D offerings to the Chinese makers, professors, and students in attendance.

 

 

 

 

Chris Romes, Senior Director of Personal Design and Fabrication at Autodesk, introduced Project Spark at the Cultural Creative Symposium "3D Printing Technology Applied in Cultural Creative Industry". The goal of the project is to make 3D printing more accessible. He said, “We are developing Spark, an open and free software platform for 3D printing that will connect digital information to 3D printers in a new way.”  The audience was impressed by the information he shared,  and a large crowd came to Chris after his presentation to learn more details.

 

If you want to learn more about Project Spark, visit the project homepage, where you can get more information and sign up to receive updates. Check out the 123D website too, and see how the existing applications can help you with 3D printing today, and take you to the next level as Project Spark is rolled out.

Read more »

MeshMixer 101: Move Objects

The Meshmixer 101 playlist is a series of videos to get you up and running with Meshmixer - allowing you to easier manipulate and edit mesh models. 

This video will show you how to move things around in 3D within Meshmixer, allowing you to position objects relative to others, or orient them for 3D printing.

123D’s Newest Maker

Did you notice the new byline? Perhaps you did a double-take? By now you’re probably wondering, who is this new author on the Autodesk 123D blog?

Allow me to introduce myself. I’m Deena - the Autodesk 123D summer intern. Join me for the next ten weeks as I embark on a deep journey of self-discovery through 3D printing… Overdramatic, but you understand.

As a self-proclaimed “maker,” I’ve delighted in the realm of fabrication, trying my hand at photography, printmaking, typography, and film. However, I have never 3D printed, and am quite excited at the prospect of 3D design and execution.

For those of you just starting with 3D printing, I invite you to join in my beginner’s experience. For those of you who avidly read the 123D blog, I’m sure you’re already far ahead of me and will delight in my inevitable misadventures, reminiscing a time when you too were a fledgling maker in the 3D world.

Having that said, I can’t wait to get #START3D. I'll be sharing my journey with you each week here on the 123D blog.

Keep your eyes peeled for my next blog post, in which I will document my introduction to 3D printing through a new lens… Literally.

 

Thiago Hersan puts the Mega in MegaFone

Featured User Banner Have you ever wanted to project a message over loudspeaker, but do it remotely?  123D Circuits user Thiago Hersan and his fellow Instructables Artist-In-Residence Radames Ajna have built it - and a lot more.  Not only does their project, called "Fofoque-me: Vox Populi" project your voice over a motorized megaphone, but you can send it an SMS that will be translated to voice and that too will played aloud to curious bystanders.

Featured User Banner

 In the above picture check out the purple motor-driver board on top of the Arduino Mega -- that was designed in 123D Circuits.  Check out a video of three MegaFones during testing.

The motor drivers get a thorough testing.


To see the full system in action...

Read more »

#NationOfMakers

 

It's official. President Obama has declared June 18, 2014 the National Day of Makers. This is no surprise, given that a revolution is taking place, where we are going back to our roots and creating things for ourselves. Borne from a Nation of Makers, we have become a #NationOfMakers.

"Our Nation is home to a long line of innovators who have fueled our economy and transformed our world. Through the generations, American inventors have lit our homes, propelled humanity into the skies, and helped people across the planet connect at the click of a button...During the National Day of Making, we celebrate and carry forward this proud tradition.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim June 18, 2014, as National Day of Making. I call upon all Americans to observe this day with programs, ceremonies, and activities that encourage a new generation of makers and manufacturers to share their talents and hone their skills." 

In honor of this declaration, the home of the President is hosting its first ever White House Maker Faire, a day dedicated to showcasing and celebrating all the talent being driven by the Maker Movement. 

You can get involved by seeing what others have made, making things yourself,  by following along with the events of the day, and by signing this pledge dedicating yourself to "working together to build maker communities throughout America and the world that introduce the maker movement to more people and expand the benefits that makers can realize through their participation."

But most importantly, you can get out there and have fun! Enjoy this National Day of Makers, everyone. And don't forget to find yourself on the map below...

 

 

123D Circuits DIY Theremin Built For Bending

The Light-Theremin is back!  The first time we blogged about this project it was a buzzing-breadboard with an uncanny ability to both inspire and distract anyone within earshot. Now it's a professionally-printed circuit board designed and ordered in 123D Circuits, and yes, it still beeps and squeaks.

Another video: using the light-theremin to play a song.


How'd we get from beeping-breadboard to poppin' PCB? With 123D Circuits, of course!  We make it easy, just design your board and click the "Buy 3 Boards..." button.  Professional PCBs will soon arrive at your doorstep.

Read more »

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