Meshmixer 2.9.2: Experiments

I've been having some fun with the new version of Meshmixer (version 2.9.2) we are releasing today. I've been following fans of Tinkerplay and 123D who have experimented with 3D printing mashups using the Tinkerplay ball and socket connectors and decided to assemble my own.The result: "Foodman" (the name just came to me) which is composed of my captures of fruit and vegetables made with 123D Catch and the new Tinkerplay part libraries that are included with this new release.

Its been a pretty easy workflow with the new improvements to the "Make Solid" tool. Now, not only are mixed up objects magically turned into one 3d printable object, but also the colors are preserved! By the way, it is pretty easy to import the captures from my 123D account within Meshmixer by clicking 123D. I'm going to print this guy in color and see how he holds together...

Though a small update with a ton of bug fixes the new updates to "Make Solid" tool made this experiment with colorful captures from 123D Catch captures from my mobile and Tinkerplay parts possible. Here is a list of the new things in Meshmixer 2.9.2:

  • New TinkerPlay part libraries
  • Make Solid can now bake uv/vertex colors to vertex colors of new mesh
  • New region-growing capability in Selection tool
  • Pivot improvements (.mix import, duplicating linked pivots, new Create modes)
  • Many bugfixes! (texture support, vertex color painting, remeshing, ...)
 
It is available now at 123dapp.com, so have some fun being a mad scientist!

 

 

Mixing it up with Tinkerplay’s New Skeleton Kit

Building off of a popular theme of a previous post to make new parts for Tinkerplay using Meshmixer and 123D, we found some pretty creative mesh mixups. Over at Mingshiuan's blog, we found a slew of modified Tinkerplay parts mixed into and printed with with the new samurai and skeleton kits that ship with the app.

Its a ton of fun to make these customized Tinkerplay parts in Meshmixer using any 3D content you can find on 123dapp.com or Thingiverse. It really just involves repurposing the Tinkerplay ball and socket connectors with anything you desire. If you are interested in doing this yourself, here is an Instructable with the basic workflow. What will you make!?