Monday Makers: MakerKids

MakerKIds CAD'ing it up at SXSW Create

 

This past weekend at SXSW I had the great fortune to hang out with the amazing group of individuals from MakerKids. One of the few and only existing Maker Spaces designed just for kids, MakerKids was started with a magic that the only the Maker Movement can provide. Started in 2010 in co-founder Andrew Forest's garage, MakerKids has grown into a world class space for kids to get hands on experience with 3D Printing, programming, electronics, woodworking, sewing and crafting. 

Co-founder Jennifer Turliuk Showing off her 3D printed un-reality glasses

 

At SXSW's Create space, MakerKids ran an amazing program showing youth how to model in TinkerCAD, and then 3D print live on location with a Cube 3D printer. The few that I witnessed were overjoyed and thrilled to be able to create something cool and then 3D print it. Co-Executive Director and Chief Happiness Officer Jennifer Turliuk walked me around the space and even let me assist a bit. I strongly encourage anyone looking into starting a space geared towards kids to check out the amazing work done at MakerKids. 

Tinkering away with MakerKids

Maker Mondays: FabCafe Tokyo

Maker Mondays: FabCafe Tokyo

http://fabcafe.com/

About a year ago at SXSW I met the incredible people from Fab Cafe Tokyo. Their english was a little hard to understand so we spoke in sign: I would hold up an object in their booth and they would throw me a thumbs up. One particular object solicited a high five - at first I was a bit puzzled and then very excited, because as it turns out they were using 123D with their customers to create some truly creative work. 

Fab Cafe sits uniquely between a TechShop and a high end coffee bar. They have created a relaxed atmosphere that is the perfect learning environment for digital manufacturing, a topic that can leave some novices with a tech hangover. Specializing in amazing coffee, highly thought-out courses, and a pristine workshop environment, I can hardly imagine a better remedy than to spend all day every day there swimming among the creatives of Tokyo. 

I recently caught up with Fab Cafe to learn about their extremely busy past year, plans for global impact, and their self created 123D Catch booth (with a little assistance from my Autodesk counterparts in Tokyo).

JHA: How did Fab Café begin? 

FC: We had a workshop with FabLab Kamakura member for 2 days in 2011. They brought various digital fabrication tools and we enjoyed them very much. We also figured out how digital fabrication tools are easy and they inspired our creativity. We thought all should be able to access these tools. Not in a lab, university and factory. That's why we put these machines in an open space - a cafe.  

JHA: Are there future plans for expanding FabCafé? 

FC:  We have branches in Taipei and Barcelona now. And we will set up another two in Barcelona soon. 

We've got many inquiries from all over the world so we hope we will setup ten FabCafe's in the world in 2014. They will lead diversity of creativity.  

The advantage of digital fabrication tools are that their data is digital and easy to transfer via internet. So we can share ideas and data and output them whenever there are tools. We can expand FabCafe network without geographical limitation.   

JHA: What has surprised you most about your customers? 

FC:  Yusuke Ohno is our customers and is also our collaborator. His work "360 degree book" is featured by many blogs, art sites and big fashion brand offered him to display his work in the store. Finally, the US company offered him to make his original 360 degree lamp shade for sale. It's a wonderful story that a work made in FabCafe became international famous art work and became a product.

We are inspired by our customers all time. 

JHA: Can you tell us a bit more about the 123D Courses? 

FC: We installed 3D printers FabCafe last May. Many customers were interested in 3D printer but they feel it's difficult to make 3D model. But it's not true. We want to change their mind. 3D modeling is accessible and 3D printer is also accessible for all. So we started Fab Class for entry users using 123D series. We have two courses.  One is using 123D creature, the other is using Tinkercad. It's great thing that most of participants print out their work by 3D printer after the class.

 

 

 

 

123D Make, Self Portrait as Kali

Self Portrait as Kali p1 

Anna Kaziunas France's sculpture "Self Portrait as Kali" was created from several photographs using the program ReconstructMe. She created two 3d models that were then merged with MeshMixer to create two sets of arms on a single torso. Both sets of arms are broken off at the forearms, as if the original scan were of an ancient statue that had been damaged over time. The final 3D model was sliced into 125 individual flat pieces using 123D Make, then routed on a ShopBot PRS Standard out of 1/2" MDF. The slices were then assembled and painted by hand.

The skull beads that make up the necklace and the belt were created from a 123D Catch scan of a single prop skull. OpenSCAD was used to import and manipulate the the skull scan into single and multi-face skull beads. The beads were smoothed with MeshMixer and printed on a first generation MakerBot Replicator. The beads were individually painted and strung as a belt and necklace, then used to adorn the assembled body.

123D Make cut outs of sculpture

This work has been displayed at the 3D Printed sculpture show "Bits to Its" at the Landing Gallery, in Rockport, ME and debuted in "Saturnalia" at the Candita Clayton Gallery in Pawtucket, RI. 

 

#FANTASIZ3D

 

Sculpture Details:

Title: Self Portrait as Kali

Medium: printed plastic, routed MDF, paint

Date of Creation: 11/19/2012

Size:

32.5" tall

26.194" wide

12.228" deep

 

123D Make, Self as Kali

123D Make