Tokyo Maker Faire

Maker Faires are in full swing around the world, and Autodesk 123D got in on the action this weekend in Tokyo, Japan, a city renowned for its history of innovation. 

Carl Bass, CEO of Autodesk, even got in the action, delivering a presentation on "the appearance of new manufacturing in North America."

 

The 123D team hosted an area equipped with MakerBots, iPads with all the 123D tools installed, interlock assemblies, LED badges, duct tape bags, a black rocket shelf, and even a 3D photo booth. 

 

 It's so rewarding to see firsthand how people incorporate the 123D tools into their personal creative expression. Thank you to the thousands of smiling people of all ages that came to visit and create with us! We can't wait to do it again next year, Tokyo Maker Faire!

 

Halloween(3D)! Playing with 123D at the Autodesk offices.

We've been getting into the spirit of Halloween at the Autodesk offices, and I'm taking the opportunity to test what I can do with the 123D apps.  

123D Make is great for making models at a larger scale cheaply and quickly.  Granted, we have some Epilog lasers at the shop that sure beat an Xacto knife, but it's all stuff you can do with technology that's available to you, either by hand or through 3D printer service, or your own machines.  123D Creature has an awesome community that is making some pretty impressive monsters, and Tinkercad is great for some quick fixes to 3D models.

 

Cardboard Cthulhu at Autodesk offices.

Cthulhu Guards the Gold:
I made a big cardboard Cthulhu based on a 123D Creature model by super-user Amanda Jackson to lord over the snack machines in Autodesk's Pier 9 kitchen.  In the 123D Gallery, there are literally thousands of models to choose from - and there's no better tool than 123D Make to make it big.  Just grab some glue.

 

cardboard devil in 123D make

Cardboard Devil:
I came across a really great model of the devil character from Legend.  The Tim Curry-Satan guy.  All I can remember is him hissing at Tom Cruise, 'Boiyyyyy...'.  This particular model is cool because it started out as a Darth Maul bust by Adam Beamish, then Kaj Steveman took the wireframe and ran with it to create The Darkness.  Now he lives at my desk.  Next, I'm going to paint him the appropriate red and black.

 

 

SKULLpilepsy!!:
This one seems to be an office favorite - I love using RGB LED strips and I wanted to use the semi-transparent nature of 3D prints as a lamp.  It's pretty great, and remote controlled! 

 

Goldfish Ghost: 
For the Goldfish Ghost project, I just grabbed a great model from Tinkercad by user Chuck Norris (I really really hope it's really Mr. Norris), and ordered some Encapso from Smooth-On.  Voila - Ghost Fish!

 

There are some more in the works from me, but stay tuned to the Instructables' Make it REALly Scary contest to see other great projects..! 

 

MAKE IT REAL-LY SCARY WITH 123D – NOW LIVE ON INSTRUCTABLES!

 

We've officially launched a contest on Instructables called Make it Real-ly Scary with 123D

The contest runs through the end of October and is open call for people to use any of the 123D apps as a component to their Halloween project.  It can be as simple as remixing another user's model or as time-consuming as laser-cutting a giant Cthulhu that terrorizes the kitchen at the Autodesk offices.  

We have some pretty great prizes too! Our friends at Zebra Imaging and iMaterialise are the Prize Providers for the contest and have forked over some pretty righteous goods.  Grand prize is a HUGE hologram (24"x34") from Zebra Imaging, $100 print credit with iMaterialise, and a 2-year Premium membership to 123D!  Zebra hasn't offered this size hologram directly to our users before, so we're excited to see one.

Good luck!

Maker Faire Toronto

The 123D team made their way to Maker Faire Toronto this previous weekend to celebrate all things Maker. Check out this video they put together for the coolest cardboard knight costume you've ever seen. 

 

Don't be too jealous though, because you can make one of your very own using Autodesk 123D right now. 

 

Introducing 123D for the Tinkercad community

Autodesk is pleased to welcome Tinkercad to our family of fun, powerful and easy-to-use tools! We’d also like to extend that welcome to you, the community of users that has made Tinkercad great. For those of you who aren't familiar with 123D or are here for the first time, check out the brief video tour below, and then read on for an introduction to the rest of the 123D family, and some of the things you can do with them. You'll find tools that help you get 3D models of real world objects into Tinkercad, help to make your Tinkercad models into physical objects, and design software to take your designs to the next level.

To get the most out of 123D, you should sign up for an Autodesk account. A free account will let you store projects in our online gallery, and download files from our content library and from other users. A premium membership will increase your access to premium content, give you access to an Instructables Pro membership, discounts on the purchase of a Makerbot, and many other benefits.

   

123D Catch turns a series of photographs into a detailed 3D model of an object.  You can take pictures with the iPhone and iPad versions, or use a digital camera with any modern internet browser that works with Tinkercad. We also have a standalone desktop version for Windows. Tools available in the desktop or online versions of 123D Catch help you clean up your scans, select the most important parts, and export a file suitable for 3D printing or CNC.


When you export a file for 3D printing from 123D Catch, Tinkercad can import these files (.STL or .OBJ) directly, and manipulate them like other solids. You can scale them, move them, and combine them with other solids. (In fact, Tinkercad does a great job of preparing 123D Catch files for printing).

123D Design is a 3D design program, much like Tinkercad, but with additional features that can help take your designs to the next level. Features like fillets (rounded edges), chamfers (angled edges), Smart Text and the ability to “tweak” edges to make complex geometries give you the power and flexibility to design just about anything you can imagine – and make it look sleek and professional! Tinkercad users should feel right at home with the interface, too.


123D Design can tap into an extensive library of premium models, hosted on the 123D Gallery website. You can also store your own creations on the 123D website, and share them amongst the various editions of 123D Design. 123D Design is available on the iPad, in any browser that supports Tinkercad, as well as a more powerful standalone desktop version for both Mac and Windows. You can export files from Tinkercad as you would for 3D printing, and import them into 123D Design, where you can scale them, move them, and combine them with other solids. You can’t currently edit Tinkercad files in 123D Design, but we’re working on it.

123D Make is a powerful program that takes a 3D model and prepares it for fabrication using many different techniques. For example, you can slice your model into layers, cut these layers out of cardboard using a laser cutter, and assemble into really big constructions.


You can also export files from Tinkercad as you would for 3D printing (STL format) and import them into 123D Make. They work great! 123D Make is available as a full-featured desktop app, and with the most popular functions as a browser based web app, compatible with any browser that supports Tinkercad.

The 123D Gallery acts as the connecting hub between the various apps, as a community for sharing with other users, and as a library for great content. In the near future, we will be developing additional tools for working on your 3D projects that will be hosted here.


All of the 123D apps support saving and loading files from the 123D website, giving you the convenience of being able to access all your projects from any of the platforms: mobile, web and desktop. You can browse and remix projects from other users, and also choose from the library of premium 3D models prepared by Autodesk. It’s also a great place to comment on projects by other users, and share models that you are proud of. Make sure to sign up for membership to make the most of these online features.

Getting things made
The 123D family of programs supports many different ways of turning your digital creations into physical objects. You can choose from carving out of wood (CNC Utility), 3D printing (Autodesk 3D Print Utility) or laser cut slices of cardboard or wood (123D Make). If you don’t have access to workshop tools yourself, you can request services from our many fabrication partners – either via the 123D website or from within the apps themselves.

We hope you find this introduction to the world of 123D interesting, and look forward to seeing what we can make together with these tools! Sign up for a 123D account now!

Carbon Fiber guitar. Go Make one this weekend with 123D.

Last month in San Francisco, TechShop members had a little party over the weekend to make their own custom guitars. That's rad enough, but the workshop aimed one step further and taught them how to do it in Carbon Fiber.

The process is simpler than you'd think.  With a basic guitar body design, you can build a model in 3D software (123D Design is free), then take that file via an .stl model into 123D Make, which slices the model into cross sections that you can laser cut (or go analog and grab an Exacto blade).  Once those are stacked and glued together, you have a mold!!  Read this Instructable on how to do to do it, you'll get no spoilers here.

OR, you can listen to the Safety Third Show - in Episode 1, they go through the experience of the workshop and Blaine sings a little song.

Here's the coverage on Wired Design:


Introducing 123D Premium Membership

Today you may have noticed the addition of "go premium" in the upper corner of the 123D site.  We've just started offering a new level of membership intended for those of you who have been asking for more stuff to help support the things you are making.

Right now, premium membership includes two key benefits; a free 3D print, and an Instructables Pro membership.  An Instructables Pro account gives you access to eBooks, downloadable pdfs of projects, private Instructables, and more, so you can take better advantage of the projects you want to make and those you want to share. And if you've been interested in ordering a print of one of your models – or you're modeling something specific to print – as part of your premium membership you'll be able to get a free 3D print up to 4"x4"x4", made on one of our sweet Objet 3D printers.

This is just the beginning for premium membership, we've already got updates in the works. You'll see premium models appearing in the Gallery – for a short time you can download those free from inside one of the 123D apps, so check them out. We'll shortly be publishing hundreds of them and premium members will have exclusive access to download and make them. We'll also be offering premium members extended private storage, for the special projects or product designs you want to keep under wraps. We have also heard requests for certain types of file translation or output. Those and other services may show up in premium down the road.

Free membership is not going away, you'll always be able to access our apps, share your projects and download other people's shared projects, and we'll continue to update and upgrade the 123D apps on desktop, web, and mobile.  But if these premium benefits are  just what you've been waiting for that's great!  If you have more ideas for premium membership, please do let us know (you can email us at 123D@autodesk.com).

Lady Liberty is appearing at Burning Man


Autodesk employee Arthur Harsuvanakit made this incredible cardboard Lady Liberty using 123D Make, 3DS Max, and a Faro Arm Laser Scanner! Sounds like serious business and definitely is.


Check out this PDF he put together detailing the build for more information!

123D Make Design in Cast Iron

Mixed-media sculpture artist Eric Jacobson has found a way to cast 123D Make designs into fantastic iron and bronze sculptures. He started by creating the sliced piece in 123D Make, then went to TechShop to laser cut the pattern out of foam and used that to create a sand mold. The finished piece is about 10" tall and cast as a solid piece of iron. Sand mold To learn more about how he created the piece, you can find step-by-step details in this Instructable. And check out more of Eric's finished pieces on his site: http://gallery.e-jacobson.com/

The five most downloaded models this week!

These would make some great holiday weekend projects - and there are tons more models in the gallery!

F86 - 15 Inches by German Angel

Old Man by Micah Ganske

Retro rocket by German Angel

T-rex, curve interlock by Peter Maxfield

Moose by Brad Harder