Maker of the Day – Arthur Ingraham (Day 12)

Arthur is a 123D Circuits user who became an electronics maker during breaks at work. A musician at heart, Arthur combined his knowledge of electronics with his love of music to make pre-amps and guitar pedals that work more smoothly with popular guitar amps on the market.

Once he mastered his trade, Arthur decided to put his talents towards something extremely important: helping his family adopt a baby from Haiti. Read more about Arthur's story below, and prepare to be inspired.

Personal website:
www.theroadhome.in

Arthur Ingraham

Why I make

am always looking for ways to improve and push my limits - I'm always curious as to what I can accomplish. TFX specifically transitioned from a hobby to a mission: 100% of profits from TFX sales will are going towards an international adoption from Haiti. 

What I make

Guitar pedals of all varieties, latley I have been designing and focusing on handmade pre-amps designed to respect a guitarist's biggest musical investment, their amp. Whether prople own a Fender, Marshall, or Vox - they do so because of the amp's unique character and voicing - I am developing preamps that are designed to serve that respective amp archetype. A pedal that works FOR the amp, not just with the amp.

Follow Arthur's shop on Reverb to not only get yourself some truly special pre-amps and guitar pedals, but to help this maker add one more to his family. 

123D Design desktop 1.4: 3D file import and 3D printing enhancements

 

It’s been a while since we released 123D Design version 1.3, at last year’s Maker Faire. A year on, we’re releasing version 1.4 . Don’t be misled by the single digit change – this is a major upgrade with features that will open up many new possibilities for you.

Keep reading to learn more about awesome new features like:

  • 3D mesh file import
  • 2D vector file import
  • Integrated 3D printing support
  • Numerous interface and usability enhancements

Read more »

Maker of the Day – Cameron Stern (Day 8)

Personal website:
www.sterndesignworks.com/

Cameron Stern

Why I make

Because there is something intrinsically satisfying about making on so many levels. I have been working with my wife for almost 8 years selling our own art and by just sharing our own obsessions with the world. We have shared so much art and wonder with people, and people have shared their own stories right back with us. I make because it is an incredible way to communicate with the world. 

What I make

As part of an awesome team I make jewelry, toys and curiosities that are inspired by science, fantasy, and whatever daily obsessions pass through my head.

While everyone in the studio plays a part in the process of creating each piece we produce, my job in the fabrication process is to provide 3d printed parts ranging from animals, astronauts, space capsules and robots, to scenic elements. I use 123D Creature as a vital creative tool to help bring a lot of those ideas to life. I model and then print out the miniatures or parts in PLA, at which point they head to the studio to either be cleaned up for lost PLA casting into silver or brass, or painted to be included in a miniature diorama necklace or sculpture. 

We first heard about Cameron when one of his designs (below) reached the front page of Reddit. 

 

Upon further investigation, we discovered Cameron is a 3D printing extraordinaire who includes the Autodesk 123D suite in his tool belt. 3D design and printing are just a few of the many forms of making that come out of his shop - that he runs with his equally impressive wife Rebecca. You can learn more about this dynamic duo about here, and if you're in the New York area you should definitely see what they're up to either in their shop or at any of the open markets they attend. 

 

Maker of the Day – John Lawton (Day 7)

Meet John Lawton: Military pilot by day, maker by night. This man proves there are no excuses when it comes to finding time for creative self-expression.

Personal website:
www.jdldesignstudios.com

John Lawton

Why I make

Both my parents are artists so I grew up in a very creative household. I've always loved to sketch and make things in my dad's metal shop since I was young and woodworking I've picked up over the last 10 years. So much of my life as a military pilot has been manuals and checklists; wood and metalworking is a great way to express my creativity and let my mind be free to invent. Seeing my design sketch sitting on top of the finished product is very satisfying! 

What I make

Custom wood and metal furniture with an industrial and modern theme. I love to incorporate the beauty of hardwoods such as walnut and maple with the strength and boldness of metals like mild steel, stainless and aluminum. Old school wood and metal working techniques are joined with cutting edge technologies like waterjetting, CNC milling and laser cutting to make completely unique works of art designed to last generations. 

John uses TechShop as a resource for both tools and community, while Autodesk Inventor serves as his design platform.

 

Maker of the Day – Martin Horn (Day 5)

Martin Horn

Why I make

I like making beautiful things. Access to digital fabrication technology made it possible for me to design my work in a software environment & be confident that my tools would create it with a level of precision that would result in a high quality piece. Precise, repeatable results has become much easier as the cost of robotic tools has fallen.

What I make

Laser cut lighting, CNC routed screens & furniture, waterjet cut screens and structures.

Check out Martin's amazing work, like the lamp below, on his website.

Maker of the Day – Ethan Blevins (Day 4)

Ethan Blevins

Why I make

I want to build myself as a creator, Since I was 7 years old I was drawing, and sculpting things by hand out of tinfoil and balls of tape. Now that I'm older I'm trying to continue that passion but with art (having jumped into the digital world). I honestly love the applications provided by Autodesk because they've given me a means to step into this world and build my skills on my own, and I hope to be able to upgrade to using some of the higher end creator tools soon like Maya once I feel my skills and my funds are up to it. 

What I make

I make 3D creatures models using 123D Creature by Autodesk on my iPad. Most of my creations are anthropomorphic in nature, but I love to branch out into unfamiliar territory and broaden my skill base by touching into sculptures I would typically not attempt. 

Maker of the Day – Niti Parikh (Day 3)

For our third Maker of the Day, meet Niti Parikh. Niti is a Bay Area TechShop user and super-maker, making the world happier one unique piece of wall art at a time.

Niti Parikh

Why I make

I have been making things using my hands and fulfilling my inner urge to create constantly since I was a kid. It was a natural choice for me to then pursue design as a career. 

When I am making a good meal, a product pieces together at the shop or making a drawing for an Interior Space I am designing for, it makes me HAPPY . I count making things as my super power, which I want to share as much as I can in this lifetime. Making is my way of giving back!

What I make

When I founded NPStudio, I wanted to make things, which is going to combine my experience from the field of Architecture and keep my love of crafts alive. Today through product line of HAPPYcardboards I make unique wall art for all ages and interiors. Each piece is hand assembled from recycled cardboard and a variety of reclaimed materials. We have also had a chance to take our methods of making with reclaimed cardboard to mainstream events and replace everyday pipe and drape stage backdrop with a backdrop made solely with recycled cardboard. We are now involved as a consultant for sustainable décor/fabrication for events and spaces.

To see more of Niti's work, check out http://nitiparikh.com.

Maker of the Day – Christer Janson (Day 2)

From AutoCAD to 123D Circuits, Christer Janson is a true maker. His latest project , the Chrutil Sequencer, was designed with Autodesk123D Circuits and allows you to play music.

Christer Janson

Why I make

I think I have always been making things. The first real maker project I can remember was trying to build a remote control for my parents TV back in the day before TV's had remotes. The TV never worked again, but I was hooked.

I write complex software for a living, which is a wonderful creative process, but sometimes I miss working with my hands and when I make things I get to combine thinking and tinkering. As a bonus I end up with cool stuff that nobody else has. 

What I make

I try to make all sorts of things. It started getting serious with a full size Arcade machine some years ago, and then when I discovered Arduino microcontrollers it really took off. I try to combine some rudimentary wood and perhaps metal working with electronics and sensors. Things that blink and move are so cool. With the discovery of 123D Circuits I have been able to build more complex electronics and lately I have been combining my love for electronics, synthesizers and making things, by building on a full size modular synthesizer. 

Christer Janson is a Sr. Software Architect for AutoCAD, and has been with Autodesk for 24 years and counting. He started with Autodesk in Sweden working mainly on 3ds Max, then was based in Switzerland for a few years, and, since 1997, has called the San Francisco Bay Area his home. Outside of work, his alter ego, Chrutil, enjoys playing music, building and tinkering with electronics and microcontrollers, and working on his modular synthesizer.

 

The quick rundown is that it's an analog sequencer consisting of a bank of knobs and switches to control pitch, beat and notes of a synthesizer or drum machine. The Chrutil Sequencer is a 32-channel analog CV/Gate sequencer with MIDI and audio features.

The front panel was designed in AutoCAD, and etched at the Autodesk Pier 9 Workshop with an Epilog 123W Laser Cutter. The electronic boards were designed with and fabricated via 123D Circuits.

 

 

Instructions:

1. Put on headphones

2. Fiddle knobs and flip switches to personalize your own beat

3. Overlay percussion using the drum machine

4. Party on

 

 

Autodesk and Lincoln team up for 3D printed creativity at Great Create

Autodesk was pleased to partner with the Lincoln Motor Company at the Great Create, a fundraising event at the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. Autodesk provided large scale 3D printed models of the new 2015 Lincoln Navigator, to be painted by two artists on site, Charlie Skala and Chisum Pierce. In addition, we provided smaller models of the car to be painted by children attending the event.

Over 200 of the little cars were painted by children at the event, in a wide variety of colors and designs.

Staff from Autodesk's 123D consumer software group demonstrated a 3D printer at the event, just like the one used to produce the smaller models.

The process of creating these models and preparing them for 3D printing was interesting. Keep reading to learn more!

Read more »

123D Circuits Gets New Superpowers

  • Design circuits in a web browser?  Check.
  • Simulate buttons, motors, resistors, and LEDs?  It’s got that too.
  • Let you write, compile, and simulate Arduino-compatible code?  Yes, yes and YES.
  • Accurately simulate capacitors and inductors in real time?  New!  
  • Display signals on a virtual Oscilloscope?  Also New!
Actual simulated waveforms.  These are not Photoshopped®
Three virtual oscilloscopes.

People who own an oscilloscope will tell you it's useful for probing into parts of a circuit and literally watching voltages change over time.  This is important because most of the time in electronics, things happen so fast you can't see them change, but with an oscilloscope you can seemingly slow time and examine things that happened in the blink of an eye.  For that reason, oscilloscopes are an incredibly useful tool and now that Transient Analysis is part of the 123D Circuits simulator you can add virtual oscilloscopes to your circuits.  It's like having a microscope for your circuits, you can see what's happening on the inside.  Wow, right?!
 
Here's an example that illustrates how powerful this is when you're learning about electronics: You connect a capacitor to a battery and the capacitor charges up -- it happens almost instantly, but exactly how almost-instantly?  With 123D Circuits's new oscilloscope you can catch that brief moment where the capacitor charged up and look at it closely.  You'll see the curved graph of the cap's voltage rising.  You can then click on the capacitor, change it's value and immediately see the difference it makes in the time it takes to charge up.  Sounds nerdy (and perhaps it is...) but being able to see this phenomena is a big step towards understanding one of the most important concepts of electronics: how things change over time, AKA Transient Analysis.
 
Scroll down to see the actual simulation of this circuit.
You could already simulate circuits in real time so... what's new?  Up until now 123D Circuits was simulating the behaviors of a circuit that happen instantaneously - like the current through and voltage across a resistor.  Ohms law stuff.
With accurate Transient Analysis built-in, it can now simulate things that are not instantaneous, like the current flowing through an inductor and the voltage rising across a capacitor.  And not just one capacitor or inductor -- you can build a complex circuit with dozens of parts (including microchips) and simulate the entire functional circuit in real time!

Here's an embedded version of the above circuit.  Click the little PLAY button in the upper right.
(best viewed in the Chrome browser)
 
 
Keep reading to find out more about what you can simulate.

Read more »