PINHOL3D: 3D printing through a new lens

 

The inspiration for my first project stems from a deep-rooted love for iPhone photography. While a number of phone apps exist for the sole purpose of photo manipulation, there are comparatively few hardware accessories that serve the same purpose. Recalling my days of haphazardly taping a pinholed-cardboard square to my iPhone camera, I envisioned my first 3D printing project achieving that same grainy, vignetting effect in hardware form. Enter my first project: the iPhone pinhole camera.

freshly-printed iPhone pinholes

My first attempt at the iPhone pinhole was only minorly successful. I modeled the device on Tinkercad, essentially slicing off two-thirds of an already-created iPhone 5 case, and adding a cylinder with a small opening over the camera area to create the pinhole. This took all of twenty minutes; it’s that easy.

I then printed it on one of the many Objet500 printers here at Pier 9, using the Tango Black material. While the produced model was workable, the material was too flimsy to comfortably sit on the iPhone. Moreover, the pinhole was slightly too far to the left and needed to be manually adjusted for each picture.

Thus, I returned to the drawing board (that is, Tinkercad). This time, I used iPhone specs detailed in Apple’s developer guide to locate the center of the camera. Using Tinkercad’s ruler feature, I easily plugged in the specified measurements and there it was — a complete second iteration in less than half an hour. Total insanity.

Honestly, the longest part of this process was waiting for a fellow Pier 9 shop user’s piece to finish printing so I could load my creation onto the Objet500. But after a mere hour of watching the printer lay down layer upon layer of model material, there it was — the material version of an idea that I’d conceived of 24 hours before this moment.

Excavating the model from its support materialHot off the object

Despite my immediate urge to test it out, I needed to dislodge the piece from its support material encasing — a process that I greatly underestimated. After half an hour of chiseling away at the support material with a power washer and a variety of ice-pick-resembling hand tools, there was my glistening iPhone pinhole camera.

So here — directly from my new pinhole camera to your screen — is the world of an Autodesk intern through a Tinkercad-created lens:

I also modeled a number of iterations, experimenting with the depth of the pinhole casing as well as the number and orientation of pinholes. Follow my instructable, print your own, and play around with your pinhole images on Pixlr for extra vintage-looking, instagram-able results.

 

Innovation in 3D Printing Powered by Autodesk

With products ranging from stem cells, shoes and mini-statues, 3D printing has started to boom in China amid the industry's rapid development worldwide, and this was showcased at the 2014 World 3D Printing Technology Industry Conference held on June 19-22, in Qingdao, Shandong Province. This event is co-organized by the World 3D Printing Technology Industry Alliance, the China 3D Printing Technology Industry Alliance, the Asian Manufacturing Association, and the Qingdao municipal government. 

Autodesk sees an opportunity---and need---to speed the pace of innovation in the 3D printing industry. Standing at the frontier of 3D printing technology, we want to help make 3D printing accessible to millions of Chinese people by lowering existing barriers to entry and providing leading applications. The Autodesk 123D Shanghai team set up a promising booth at the aforementioned event and introduced all of our 123D offerings to the Chinese makers, professors, and students in attendance.

 

 

 

 

Chris Romes, Senior Director of Personal Design and Fabrication at Autodesk, introduced Project Spark at the Cultural Creative Symposium "3D Printing Technology Applied in Cultural Creative Industry". The goal of the project is to make 3D printing more accessible. He said, “We are developing Spark, an open and free software platform for 3D printing that will connect digital information to 3D printers in a new way.”  The audience was impressed by the information he shared,  and a large crowd came to Chris after his presentation to learn more details.

 

If you want to learn more about Project Spark, visit the project homepage, where you can get more information and sign up to receive updates. Check out the 123D website too, and see how the existing applications can help you with 3D printing today, and take you to the next level as Project Spark is rolled out.

Read more »

MeshMixer 101: Move Objects

The Meshmixer 101 playlist is a series of videos to get you up and running with Meshmixer - allowing you to easier manipulate and edit mesh models. 

This video will show you how to move things around in 3D within Meshmixer, allowing you to position objects relative to others, or orient them for 3D printing.

123D’s Newest Maker

Did you notice the new byline? Perhaps you did a double-take? By now you’re probably wondering, who is this new author on the Autodesk 123D blog?

Allow me to introduce myself. I’m Deena - the Autodesk 123D summer intern. Join me for the next ten weeks as I embark on a deep journey of self-discovery through 3D printing… Overdramatic, but you understand.

As a self-proclaimed “maker,” I’ve delighted in the realm of fabrication, trying my hand at photography, printmaking, typography, and film. However, I have never 3D printed, and am quite excited at the prospect of 3D design and execution.

For those of you just starting with 3D printing, I invite you to join in my beginner’s experience. For those of you who avidly read the 123D blog, I’m sure you’re already far ahead of me and will delight in my inevitable misadventures, reminiscing a time when you too were a fledgling maker in the 3D world.

Having that said, I can’t wait to get #START3D. I'll be sharing my journey with you each week here on the 123D blog.

Keep your eyes peeled for my next blog post, in which I will document my introduction to 3D printing through a new lens… Literally.

 

123D Make 3D DIY Projects. Made With Cricut.

photo of paper projects next to a Cricut Explore machine

Looking for a fun DIY project, but not prolific with scissors or don’t own a laser cutter? We’re happy to announce that Autodesk 123D has partnered with Cricut to bring a series of easy-to-assemble 3D DIY projects to Makers and Crafters. From rocket ships to dinosaurs to smartphone stands, these projects will delight and entertain boys and girls of all ages whether you’re 5 or 50!
 

All you need to get started is an affordable Cricut Explore™ electronic cutting machine, the free online Cricut Design Space™ software, and off-the-shelf poster board. Cardboard brown is no longer your only color option!


The first 8 projects are pictured below, clicking on them will take you to their respective project pages.  If you already own a Cricut Explore, load up the poster board and start cutting! The smartphone stand will make a great Fathers' Day present!

And make sure to keep checking back on Autodesk 123D's Blog and Cricut Partner Page, as well as Cricut's Autodesk Projects Page for even more projects!


What's the origin story of these beautiful projects, you ask? These first-of-its-kind 3D Cricut projects started off as 3D models from the 123Dapp.com gallery. The models were then infused with the unique slicing technology of 123D Make and transformed into easy-to-assemble cut patterns!

 

p/s. Full instructions coming soon to an Instructable near you! 

Maker of the Day – Gerry Paquette (Day 29)

 

 

Gerry Paquette

Why I make

I teach board game design in a Game Development program at Algonquin college in Ottawa. The college Print Shop recently invested in 3D printers and I encourage my students to make use of it by creating custom bits for their games. As first-year students, most of them haven't had any training using 3D software. Tinkercad is the ideal entry-level tool that does not overwhelm it's users with options. In fact, limited options allows for a more creative approach to design. 

Once the students have sent me their models in .STL format, I'm able to preview them in Tinkercad and make modifications in terms of sizing and thickening elements that are likely to break before sending them on to be printed. 

What I make

I use Tinkercad to make custom board game components primarily. Recently I used it to create a flea circus as part of my costume for local Steampunk 5 year anniversary gala. 

My current project, Battle Cubed, is a tactical 3- dimensional space fighting game that features 3D printed ships and a 2D stand with platforms that are laser cut out of acrylic and assembled into a 3-tiered playing surface.

 

 

Maker of the Day – Emmanuel Di Giacomo (Day 28)

 

 

Emmanuel Di Giacomo

Why I make

I am an Architect by training and I have always been crazy of Utopy in Architecture. I was also a former alumni of Paul Maymont, a famous French Architect and Utopist of the 60ies.I designed and drew my first architectural creations when I was 15. The Story became even stronger when I used my first 3D Software in 1989 on a Mac. I then fell in love with Revit and decided to continue the Utopic Story by giving life to the Utopic City. 

What I make

I design and create a Revit Utopic City in 3D based on the map of famous cities like Roma and Milan. It's made of hundreds of crazy and nice buildings and infrastructures, a completely imaginary and complex world that more than 93,600 Facebook lovers follow in the world. It allows also to show the creative power of a BIM tool like Revit.

 

 

Meshmixer 2.4: Collect the Gold, Silver, AND Bronze

 

Autodesk Meshmixer 2.4

Autodesk continued the full court press on 3D printing today with the release of Meshmixer 2.4. Most notable with this release is the integration of direct printing to popular 3D printing services: i.materialise, Sculpteo, and Shapeways. 

The integration of the printing services within the 3D printing section now allows you to print in nearly any material including food safe ceramic, jewelry quality gold and silver, and the lower costing plastics and polyamides in different solid colors to name a few. The pricing is interactive, so one can easily size up a model with the material of their choice and get an instant quote from the printing service within Meshmixer. Making the object smaller will make the 3D print less expensive, which makes it easy to bargain for how much you want to pay to see your creation made real. See the video below for a quick workflow of healing a 123D Catch capture for 3D printing in a silver material with a 3D printing service. A new playlist of videos here, called Meshmixer 101 will get you up to speed with the basics of working in Meshmixer.

 

Creating, editing and printing to any 3D printer is a breeze, especially if you have a Type A Machines "2014 Series 1" printer. Meshmixer can send prints directly to your networked 2014 Series 1 3D printer, eliminating the need to fumble around with memory cards. Thanks to the folks at Type A Machines for their collaboration!!

 Meshmixer Patterned Logo with Bunnies

 

Meshmixer also adds some powerful new Patterning techniques with this release, examples shown above, which creates a border based on FaceGroups. We've been having a lot of fun with this new technique to easily create variations of existing models in our library....CHECK IT OUT!