Autodesk Meshmixer for YOU

We've been ramping up our Meshmixer production lately and released a new update with YOU in mind. See, we are gathering all of your feedback and suggestions and adding it into the application. We are especially excited for the new 3D printing workflows that are coming with each release, some examples below.

Patterned Bunny Pack

Make Slices  

Many of you requested to have 3D printers that we did not list in the pre-populated list of 3D printers. We heard you and decided to let you add your own 3D printer so you can layout and arrange a print job for your specific machine. Its fairly intuitive to set up if you at least know the build volume of your 3D printer.

Here is a list of what's new in Meshmixer 2.3, released yesterday, April 21st:

  • New add/edit custom printer so you can prep your 3D prints for any 3D printer
  • New Make Slices tool: Slice an object into a number flat slices. Two techniques: Stacked or Stacked3D
  • New drag/drop solid objects in addition to parts. Addition of primitives category
  • Added part categories to the Meshmix panel to accommodate growing libraries of parts and solids
  • New Separate Shells tool to separate combined but separate geometry into separate objects
  • Better naming of newly created objects from duplicate, separate, etc…
  • PLY binary format support (which is handy for importing the per-vertex color meshes coming in from depth cameras)
  • 3Dconnexion space mouse support
  • Lots of bug-fixes and stability improvements

By the way, it is now even easier to give us your feedback and suggestions directly from the application! You can see a new menu item named Feedback that you can use to send feedback (good or bad) directly to the developers. With this, you might possibly define some of the next features in the upcoming releases!

How do you use Meshmixer? What would you like to see next?

Pendant

Pendant designed in Meshmixer. A multi-material print on a Stratasys Connex machine

 

123D Design Desktop – Revamped

Chris Anderson may have broken the news before we got to it, but that doesn't make us any less excited to share the new and improved desktop version of 123D Design with you! 

 

Yes, that's right folks. 123D Design got a facelift, and you're going to like the way it looks. With a new UI, new features, and so much more, 123D Design makes it easier than ever for beginners, novices, and experts to get in on the fun that is 3D printing.

Check out the changes here, and stay tuned for more pictures, tutorials, and an in-depth guide to the changes.

 

Beyond the blocks: modeling a space plane for 3D printing in Tinkercad

When people think about modeling rockets and space ships in Tinkercad, they can be forgiven for thinking that all you can do is stick a cone shape on top of a cylinder, and call it a day - but they're wrong! Tinkercad can do a lot more.

Tinkercad has a very powerful engine under the hood, and with some creativity and ingenuity, you can make great looking models that rival those from other 3D modeling packages - and do it fast, for free and in your browser.

Keep reading and follow along the Instructable if you want to learn more.

Read more »

Glow-in-the-Dark Rocket Mobile with 123D and Tinkercad

We've been thinking about rockets and spaceships this week at 123D and we had some cool glow-in-the-dark filament for a Makerbot Rep2, so naturally: GLOW IN THE DARK SPACESHIPS!

The models came directly from the 123Dapp.com gallery, and the planets, end caps and filament points I quickly modeled in Tinkercad. Because the rockets were taller than would fit on a Makerbot, I imported them into MeshMixer to chop them in half witht the Slice tool. Slicing them also allowed for printing without support material.  With a little Krazy Glue, you get more size options.

If you want to make this yourself, you can try downloading more and different rockets. We've collected together a bunch of really varied rocket designs. ( <- click to see the collection and download!)

The trickiest part of a mobile is (perhaps obvious) is the balancing of all the elements - both physically and visually.  I printed a couple different sizes of rockets and planets, with varying infills so that I would have options when I started assembling it.  Only after printing the last rocket did I realize I could have just modeled the eyelets, but there you have it.

In total, the project cost about $15 in parts and materials: monofilament, eyelets, dowels and krazy glue. 

 

This is a perfect weekend project - and the glow-in-the-dark filament is available from Makerbot.  See the whole project here on 123dapp.com.  What are you making for SPAC3D?

The Blood Moon – Tonight!

Eerie name for a blog post, right? Well have no fear, it all comes back to our theme of the month - space! Tonight those of us on Earth will play witness to a full lunar eclipse, affectionately nicknamed "The Blood Moon" due to the reddish-orange color the moon will take on just past 3am Eastern. 

This moon marks the first of four total eclipses that will conclude in September 2015, a phenomenon known as a tetrad. We hope to see you out there gazing skyward, hoping to uncover the mysteries of the universe while using the rare event as an opportunity to say words like "umbra," and to make use of all the awesome moon and moon-related models living in the 123D gallery

For more information on where you can view this stellar event (see what we did there?), check out this site.

Simulate space capsule re-entry with Autodesk 123D

Right now everyone is getting excited about space - with Mars at its brightest last night, and a lunar eclipse coming up next week, it's hard to not look up at the sky and wonder how you too can explore the universe. Here at the 123D secret headquarters, we are also excited about everything astronomical, so we put together a project that explores the basic concepts behind the not-so-basic practice of re-entry to Earth. To do so, we need to understand flow and pressure around a space capsule coming back to Earth (yay, science!).

Looking at our suite of apps, we wanted to give you something mobile, free, and easy. This led us to putting together a project using iOS Design and ForceEffect Flow, which enables you to simulate the airflow around an object – all on an iPad.

Read more »

Rockets and Robots: exploring STEM education with 123D

April is a big month for rockets and robots, and for STEM education in general. Here at the Autodesk 123D world headquarters, we are pleased to provide you with tools and project ideas that will help you explore this field.

Coming up first is Yuri's Night, a celebration of the first manned flight into space, on April 12th. We have an extensive collection of 3D rocket models in the 123D Gallery, and we've gathered them together for your convenience. Check out some of them below. You can download them, change them, 3D print them and share them with your friends. Stay tuned for tutorials on how you can use 123D Design, Tinkercad and Meshmixer to make some great things.

Soon after that, two major competitive robotics events are coming up, both from April 23-26: The VEX Robotics World Championship in Anaheim, California; and the FIRST Robotics Competition in St. Louis Missouri. We'll be publishing simple robotics projects to get you started in this field, integrating electronics and 3D printing.

You can also find some great 3D models of robots in the 123D Gallery - we've packaged up some of them, but feel free to go exploring: there are a lot more! Use them as a starting point for some fun projects.

Keep checking back, for fun and easy projects you can do, and a surprise guest!

How-To’s & Free 3D Models for Arduino’s 10th Birthday. #ArduinoD14

Arduino Day


Let’s celebrate Arduino’s 10th anniversary with some pointers on getting started with an Arduino compatible board in 123D Circuits, and a handful of free 3D models from the 123D Gallery.

In case you didn't already know: 123D Circuits is the newest addition to the 123D family of apps. One of it's finest attributes is the ability to simulate an Arduino in your browser without having to touch (ahem... blow up) any hardware. Yes, you can design circuit boards in 123D Circuits and they'll automagically arrive at your door in 10-12 days, but we're here now because we love Arduino boards and we have a few Instructables already written to get you going with an Arduino in 123D Circuits HERE and HERE.

Example circuit, press the PLAY button in the upper right hand corner to see it ping-pong with LEDs.

 

Do you already know all about Arduino? Then head on over to the Instructables Arduino contest There's still time to submit an entry. Wondering what other people are working on? People like you just voted for the winners of the 123D Circuits contest on Instructables.



If you'd like to 3D print a case look no further; the 123D Gallery is full of 3D models of various Arduino board enclosures and useful parts.  These are great 3D Models to 3D Print as-is or modify with one of our apps like MeshMixer or Tinkercad.  You can download them for free to use in your own projects!

Arduino compatible boards and other parts

Arduino Uno R3Arduino ProtoshieldBreadboardArduino Bot Platform


Cases

Arduino DiecimilaArduino LilypadArduino Due CaseArduino Extreme (Uno) Case


Cases, Bumpers, Misc.

Arduino Uno BumperTall Arduino Uno CaseArduino Galileo mountStepper Motor Driver Board

Note: Here is a complete list of Arduino-related models (100+ pcs.) found in 123D Gallery. Some models mentioned in this post are from the Premium 123D collection, however even Free 123D membership owners can download up to 10 premium models per month! 


3D print these models

Follow below steps to print these Arduino-related models on your 3D printer:

  1. Download a model of your choice by clicking on any one of the "Download model (.stl)" links found on the model pages.
  2. Download Meshmixer, a free, powerful tool from Autodesk to work with 3D models. Go to Meshmixer page for more info.
  3. Print model after setting it up and refining it in Meshmixer.

 


Register for free to download these, and many more 3D models:

Register now

3D Hubs + Autodesk 123D = Party Time (And Workshop)

 

 

+

=

Party Time

 

Hello 3D printing community in and around San Francisco! On behalf of both Autodesk and 3D Hubs, we’d like to cordially invite you to join a free mixer we will be hosting at our Gallery in downtown San Francisco. 

Mixer Date and Venue

Autodesk Gallery at One Market

1 Market St #200, San Francisco

Friday, April 11th, 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

 

We will be welcoming an exciting panel of guest speakers to this event (see below), all speaking on design applications in 3D printing, and representing the industries of industrial design, architecture, the arts, the internet, 3D printer design, and more! Come learn more about Autodesk 123D and 3D printing services offered by 3D Hubs.

For those of you who don’t know, 3D Hubs is a great way to crowdsource local 3D printers, giving you easy access to 3D printing. Learn more about them here, and at our Mixer and Workshop events!

There will be free bites, soda, local craft beer, and even a raffle. Please register here to reserve your ticket to the Mixer and place entry into the raffle. Note that space is limited and we will be checking registration at the door.

For our more hands-on friends, check out our Workshop earlier in the day to learn more about 3D printing! You can register for the Workshop here

Workshop Date and Venue

Autodesk Gallery at One Market

1 Market St #200, San Francisco

Friday, April 11th, 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm 

We look forward to seeing you there!

 

HIGHFIV3D: Autonomous Reassurance Device – Part 2

(I only had a small speaker on hand, please forgive the audio)

I started working on the electronics component to the HighFiv3D machine this week. In my previous post, I went from using a piezo senseor to an accelerometer; then this week I decided to do a tilt sensor before getting frustrated trying to debounce it. So ACCELEROMETER it is...!

The first step was gathering parts. After a bit of advice from Gian Pablo and Rob, I figured I'd need an Arduino Uno, a Wave Shield and the accelerometer to start. We have some Arduinos on hand at Pier 9, but you can get everything from Adafruit, retailing for about $60.

The Wave Shield is basically another circuit board that sits directly on top of an Ardiuno and allows for .wav files to be played from an SD card. Now I can record the audio with my laptop, convert to the proper file type (.wav) and store them on an SD card for random play when prompted; in this case, when the accelerometer is moved.

I used Adafruit's Wave Shield Kit, v.1.1, for which they have a great tutorial on soldering and building the actual board. If you can solder, it's very simple. You'll need a 2GB SD card (it can't use anything larger) that is formatted - I used the SD formatter that Adafruit suggested, but Mac's Disk Utility will work. Once the board was built per the instructions, I only added some female headers to make testing easier.

For the accelerometer, the only soldering that's required is the wire leads that will run from the Arduino to the Shield/Arduino. I chose Yellow/Blue/Red for my X,Y and Z motions, black for power and green for ground (my electronics aptitude has been dictated by motorcycle wiring). Just leave a foot or so of wire slack to test the sensor.


Once the shield was finished, I started working on the coding. My programming experience is pretty limited (I once made a light blink with an Arduino, but that's about it). Fortunately, there is a HUGE community with pre-written codes (Sketches), so you can get away with not having to completely write it yourself. I pulled from Adafruit's example sketches for the Wave Shield and the accelerometer. The Arduino forums are a good resource too. But, since I sit next to him, I asked Gian Pablo to help me with the shield code first.

From Gian Pablo:

The great thing about using the Arduino for DIY projects is that it is so widely used that you can almost always find an example or project that to get you started. For this project, we used the WaveShield from Adafruit (https://www.adafruit.com/products/94) to provide audio output. It is a simple Arduino shield with an SD card slot and audio output. We connected an accelerometer, an ADXL335 on a breakout board.

For programming, we just used one of the examples from Adafruit as a starting point, in this case the Play6_HC example (http://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-wave-shield-audio-shield-for-arduino/play6-hc). We wanted to modify it so that instead of reading a button press to trigger the audio response, it would respond to sudden motion of the accelerometer, and allow for some time for the hand to settle down each time (if someone gave it a good whack). This only required 3 lines of code, and then we had to make some slight changes to the rest of the program so that it would choose a random response each time.

After a couple of hours we were good to go!

The only .wav files I had on hand were from Star Wars and Nacho Libre (don't ask), so I put them on the SD card, followed some directions, and voila... my little shield was talking to me. Incessantly.

Then, with the accelerometer tuned in - I was eventually able to activate random files by hitting the sensor. I was frustrated for 2 days because I kept getting an error, but we eventually realized that the file names were too long!! With just the shield, the file names didn't matter, it just played whatever is on the card. However, with the accelerometer and randomization, the same files wouldn't play because they were over 8 characters. Once I abbreviated them, it would play perfectly.