Maker of the Day – Andy Lee (Day 25)

 

 

Andy Lee

Why I make

I've always made stuff. It's an exploration i've been on for a long time. I am interested in how everything is made. All things from how is steel forged to how are silicone etched and packaged or how does a designer decide what the visual details they might add to their products.

Making stuff leads me on these journeys where I discover new ways that things can be made and built. 

What I make

Most of the things I make are tools for living. I've made lines of furniture and household accessories. I've been interested in robotics for a long time. In 2008 I made my own 3D printer in my apartment on my kitchen table. Everyone asked if they needed 3D goggles.

I made a chess board that had a gantry with a magnet underneath the board. It could adjust the magnet and move the pieces around. There was an RFID reader which could read tags that we placed in the base of the pieces. 

Right now I am exploring aperiodic stacking patterns of polyhedrons.

See more of Andy's work at http://5cell.net/

 

Meshmixer 2.4: Collect the Gold, Silver, AND Bronze

 

Autodesk Meshmixer 2.4

Autodesk continued the full court press on 3D printing today with the release of Meshmixer 2.4. Most notable with this release is the integration of direct printing to popular 3D printing services: i.materialise, Sculpteo, and Shapeways. 

The integration of the printing services within the 3D printing section now allows you to print in nearly any material including food safe ceramic, jewelry quality gold and silver, and the lower costing plastics and polyamides in different solid colors to name a few. The pricing is interactive, so one can easily size up a model with the material of their choice and get an instant quote from the printing service within Meshmixer. Making the object smaller will make the 3D print less expensive, which makes it easy to bargain for how much you want to pay to see your creation made real. See the video below for a quick workflow of healing a 123D Catch capture for 3D printing in a silver material with a 3D printing service. A new playlist of videos here, called Meshmixer 101 will get you up to speed with the basics of working in Meshmixer.

 

Creating, editing and printing to any 3D printer is a breeze, especially if you have a Type A Machines "2014 Series 1" printer. Meshmixer can send prints directly to your networked 2014 Series 1 3D printer, eliminating the need to fumble around with memory cards. Thanks to the folks at Type A Machines for their collaboration!!

 Meshmixer Patterned Logo with Bunnies

 

Meshmixer also adds some powerful new Patterning techniques with this release, examples shown above, which creates a border based on FaceGroups. We've been having a lot of fun with this new technique to easily create variations of existing models in our library....CHECK IT OUT!

Maker of the Day – Thiago Hersan (Day 21)

Thiago Hersan

Why I make

It helps me think about things and it helps me communicate things about thoughts.

What I make

Installations and apps that deal with mediated spaces in human-human communication; why we communicate, and how. 

Maker of the Day – Adrian Stein (Day 19)

 

Here is a Maker Of The Day that we have been excited to share with you for some time. Everything that art, 3D printing, and the maker movement is, has revealed itself through the work of this individual. But what can we say about Adrian? In addition to his skills with Meshmixer and 3D manipulation, Mr. Stein is also a gifted writer and speaker, so we will let him speak for himself.

Adrian Stein

Why I make

This is a far too existential of a question for me to answer in short form, my attempt to condense it might be a little confusing, so I apologize in advance. A feeling of cold emptiness takes over my stomach when I become hungry for food, I can stand it, sometimes its hard, but other things distract me. When I have hunger for expression, a feeling of empowering energy, coupled with anxious necessity springs my eyes to an eternal gaze, my throat becomes clogged by the oncoming wave of thought, speaking becomes insufficient, I must make. It helps me clear my mind, by making I am able to see my emotions, feel them physically. Although, sometimes I need to make things that are emotion-less, sometimes making is forgetting, sometimes making is un-making. I came to think of it as my escape, my escape from anything I need to feel; on the other side, it became my gateway, any land I wanted to reach I figured I must make. Making, art, is my therapy. 

What I make

The majority of my practice revolves around the three dimensional object; I find this to be the realm with the least restrictions. There is something incredibly attractive about an object you can touch, smell, interact with, and look at in all angles; it creates an almost intimate dance between the viewer and the piece, creating small conversations, intrapersonal connections, brief moments of intimacy, memories, laughter and cries. Objects have a very interesting power, we deal with them on a daily basis but a lot of us seem to ignore them; when some are presented formally they take on thisrevealing, ephemeral quality. Suddenly, they become easier to “see”, the objects reveal their meaning, information that makes way for different interpretations in every revisit, it is the closest thing to a film for me, without the moving image. I figure that this came from my early addiction to Lego play sets, a driving point for my artistic development. This is where my insatiable thirst saw its beginning, merely satisfied by the low quality, yet nearly endless possibility of these small plastic blocks; I grew to become a creator, continuously imagining and then feverishly making. As I grew older I visited more materials (metal,wood, other brands of building blocks, found objects, clay) yet that thirst got stronger and stronger. It became so fierce that I had begun to loath, even hate, the amount of conformity that my materials involved, the endless drying times, the sometimes irreversible mistakes, the brittleness of some materials and the unbendable stoutness of others, my tongue had become too dry. Therefore I sought a new invigoration, I needed to change by brand of electrolytic buildable. I needed something that could be manipulated with more liberty, something that would set the creatures inside my head free. This made me recede from the physical, and into the virtual; something I found would be a turning point in my practice. Now I almost never leave my computers side, it has become my companion in life, it houses every material I ever dreamed of, any landscape I could imagined, any tool is at my disposal there; but I couldn’t touch it, I couldn’t smell it ,I couldn’t grab it and put it in my pocket, I again became thirsty. This drought did not linger for too long, I quickly crossed paths with the most awe-inspiring bridge i had ever seen, 3D printing. This new discovery completed the circle I wished forever to fulfill; I could finally bring my visions to life. I encountered programs like Meshmixer and Tinkercad, this new virtual clay wouldn’t bend with gravity (if I wanted it to), it could form to my disposal, I can choose where and why it is strong, I can combine it, scale it, transform it, and manipulate it to my will; and then, as if it were straight from the Jetsons, I can print it. Nothing but a dream come true. Currently,with around 4 months in the field, I see my practice voyaging in this fruitful ocean. 

5LDRmH on Make A Gif, Animated Gifs

 

Stay tuned for more coming from this amazing maker - Adrian has been generous enough to keep in great contact with us, and we are looking forward to continuing to share his story with you as it progresses.

 

Here's a sneak peek of what's to come - a bracelet Adrian designed using Meshmixer of the waveform diagram of himself saying the words, "I Love You." Pretty neat, right?

Maker of the Day – Semi Han (Day 9)

 

Semi Han

Why I make

I enjoy all mediums of art, as an AS level student in London. Sculpture isn't done very often in the curriculum, so I do it as a hobby rather than for school work. 

What I make

Paintings, drawings, sculptures. Normally I sculpt faces and character design concepts of a similar theme.

 

 

Maker of the Day – John Lawton (Day 7)

Meet John Lawton: Military pilot by day, maker by night. This man proves there are no excuses when it comes to finding time for creative self-expression.

Personal website:
www.jdldesignstudios.com

John Lawton

Why I make

Both my parents are artists so I grew up in a very creative household. I've always loved to sketch and make things in my dad's metal shop since I was young and woodworking I've picked up over the last 10 years. So much of my life as a military pilot has been manuals and checklists; wood and metalworking is a great way to express my creativity and let my mind be free to invent. Seeing my design sketch sitting on top of the finished product is very satisfying! 

What I make

Custom wood and metal furniture with an industrial and modern theme. I love to incorporate the beauty of hardwoods such as walnut and maple with the strength and boldness of metals like mild steel, stainless and aluminum. Old school wood and metal working techniques are joined with cutting edge technologies like waterjetting, CNC milling and laser cutting to make completely unique works of art designed to last generations. 

John uses TechShop as a resource for both tools and community, while Autodesk Inventor serves as his design platform.

 

Maker of the Day – Ethan Blevins (Day 4)

Ethan Blevins

Why I make

I want to build myself as a creator, Since I was 7 years old I was drawing, and sculpting things by hand out of tinfoil and balls of tape. Now that I'm older I'm trying to continue that passion but with art (having jumped into the digital world). I honestly love the applications provided by Autodesk because they've given me a means to step into this world and build my skills on my own, and I hope to be able to upgrade to using some of the higher end creator tools soon like Maya once I feel my skills and my funds are up to it. 

What I make

I make 3D creatures models using 123D Creature by Autodesk on my iPad. Most of my creations are anthropomorphic in nature, but I love to branch out into unfamiliar territory and broaden my skill base by touching into sculptures I would typically not attempt. 

Maker of the Day – Niti Parikh (Day 3)

For our third Maker of the Day, meet Niti Parikh. Niti is a Bay Area TechShop user and super-maker, making the world happier one unique piece of wall art at a time.

Niti Parikh

Why I make

I have been making things using my hands and fulfilling my inner urge to create constantly since I was a kid. It was a natural choice for me to then pursue design as a career. 

When I am making a good meal, a product pieces together at the shop or making a drawing for an Interior Space I am designing for, it makes me HAPPY . I count making things as my super power, which I want to share as much as I can in this lifetime. Making is my way of giving back!

What I make

When I founded NPStudio, I wanted to make things, which is going to combine my experience from the field of Architecture and keep my love of crafts alive. Today through product line of HAPPYcardboards I make unique wall art for all ages and interiors. Each piece is hand assembled from recycled cardboard and a variety of reclaimed materials. We have also had a chance to take our methods of making with reclaimed cardboard to mainstream events and replace everyday pipe and drape stage backdrop with a backdrop made solely with recycled cardboard. We are now involved as a consultant for sustainable décor/fabrication for events and spaces.

To see more of Niti's work, check out http://nitiparikh.com.

Autodesk Meshmixer for YOU

We've been ramping up our Meshmixer production lately and released a new update with YOU in mind. See, we are gathering all of your feedback and suggestions and adding it into the application. We are especially excited for the new 3D printing workflows that are coming with each release, some examples below.

Patterned Bunny Pack

Make Slices  

Many of you requested to have 3D printers that we did not list in the pre-populated list of 3D printers. We heard you and decided to let you add your own 3D printer so you can layout and arrange a print job for your specific machine. Its fairly intuitive to set up if you at least know the build volume of your 3D printer.

Here is a list of what's new in Meshmixer 2.3, released yesterday, April 21st:

  • New add/edit custom printer so you can prep your 3D prints for any 3D printer
  • New Make Slices tool: Slice an object into a number flat slices. Two techniques: Stacked or Stacked3D
  • New drag/drop solid objects in addition to parts. Addition of primitives category
  • Added part categories to the Meshmix panel to accommodate growing libraries of parts and solids
  • New Separate Shells tool to separate combined but separate geometry into separate objects
  • Better naming of newly created objects from duplicate, separate, etc…
  • PLY binary format support (which is handy for importing the per-vertex color meshes coming in from depth cameras)
  • 3Dconnexion space mouse support
  • Lots of bug-fixes and stability improvements

By the way, it is now even easier to give us your feedback and suggestions directly from the application! You can see a new menu item named Feedback that you can use to send feedback (good or bad) directly to the developers. With this, you might possibly define some of the next features in the upcoming releases!

How do you use Meshmixer? What would you like to see next?

Pendant

Pendant designed in Meshmixer. A multi-material print on a Stratasys Connex machine

 

Maker Mondays: FabCafe Tokyo

Maker Mondays: FabCafe Tokyo

http://fabcafe.com/

About a year ago at SXSW I met the incredible people from Fab Cafe Tokyo. Their english was a little hard to understand so we spoke in sign: I would hold up an object in their booth and they would throw me a thumbs up. One particular object solicited a high five - at first I was a bit puzzled and then very excited, because as it turns out they were using 123D with their customers to create some truly creative work. 

Fab Cafe sits uniquely between a TechShop and a high end coffee bar. They have created a relaxed atmosphere that is the perfect learning environment for digital manufacturing, a topic that can leave some novices with a tech hangover. Specializing in amazing coffee, highly thought-out courses, and a pristine workshop environment, I can hardly imagine a better remedy than to spend all day every day there swimming among the creatives of Tokyo. 

I recently caught up with Fab Cafe to learn about their extremely busy past year, plans for global impact, and their self created 123D Catch booth (with a little assistance from my Autodesk counterparts in Tokyo).

JHA: How did Fab Café begin? 

FC: We had a workshop with FabLab Kamakura member for 2 days in 2011. They brought various digital fabrication tools and we enjoyed them very much. We also figured out how digital fabrication tools are easy and they inspired our creativity. We thought all should be able to access these tools. Not in a lab, university and factory. That's why we put these machines in an open space - a cafe.  

JHA: Are there future plans for expanding FabCafé? 

FC:  We have branches in Taipei and Barcelona now. And we will set up another two in Barcelona soon. 

We've got many inquiries from all over the world so we hope we will setup ten FabCafe's in the world in 2014. They will lead diversity of creativity.  

The advantage of digital fabrication tools are that their data is digital and easy to transfer via internet. So we can share ideas and data and output them whenever there are tools. We can expand FabCafe network without geographical limitation.   

JHA: What has surprised you most about your customers? 

FC:  Yusuke Ohno is our customers and is also our collaborator. His work "360 degree book" is featured by many blogs, art sites and big fashion brand offered him to display his work in the store. Finally, the US company offered him to make his original 360 degree lamp shade for sale. It's a wonderful story that a work made in FabCafe became international famous art work and became a product.

We are inspired by our customers all time. 

JHA: Can you tell us a bit more about the 123D Courses? 

FC: We installed 3D printers FabCafe last May. Many customers were interested in 3D printer but they feel it's difficult to make 3D model. But it's not true. We want to change their mind. 3D modeling is accessible and 3D printer is also accessible for all. So we started Fab Class for entry users using 123D series. We have two courses.  One is using 123D creature, the other is using Tinkercad. It's great thing that most of participants print out their work by 3D printer after the class.