Maker of the Day – Benjamin Delman (Day 24)

 

 

Benjamin Delman

Why I make

Making has found its way into all aspects of my life long ago. Whether that was building my first computer from parts, rebuilding a carburetor on a motor, deviating from a recipe in the kitchen, or building a website. I've found making something myself to be incredibly rewarding.

Naturally, when it came to giving gifts, I wanted to include that DIY attitude. Sometimes that was making the gift itself. This past December, it was just a small piece of the packaging. In all scenarios, it added that custom, personalized touch that leaves a lasting impression. 

What I make

December 2013, I had been taking a handful of classes at Autodesk's Pier 9. Rather than buying some gift tags off the shelf, I took the opportunity to use the laser cutters again and make my own. I found some Christmas themed vector art online, imported it into Illustrator, and tweaked it to fit the gift tag outline I had drawn. After adding some recipient names, these custom gift tags were ready to attach to a gift box with a little ribbon. 

 

 

Meshmixer 2.4: Collect the Gold, Silver, AND Bronze

 

Autodesk Meshmixer 2.4

Autodesk continued the full court press on 3D printing today with the release of Meshmixer 2.4. Most notable with this release is the integration of direct printing to popular 3D printing services: i.materialise, Sculpteo, and Shapeways. 

The integration of the printing services within the 3D printing section now allows you to print in nearly any material including food safe ceramic, jewelry quality gold and silver, and the lower costing plastics and polyamides in different solid colors to name a few. The pricing is interactive, so one can easily size up a model with the material of their choice and get an instant quote from the printing service within Meshmixer. Making the object smaller will make the 3D print less expensive, which makes it easy to bargain for how much you want to pay to see your creation made real. See the video below for a quick workflow of healing a 123D Catch capture for 3D printing in a silver material with a 3D printing service. A new playlist of videos here, called Meshmixer 101 will get you up to speed with the basics of working in Meshmixer.

 

Creating, editing and printing to any 3D printer is a breeze, especially if you have a Type A Machines "2014 Series 1" printer. Meshmixer can send prints directly to your networked 2014 Series 1 3D printer, eliminating the need to fumble around with memory cards. Thanks to the folks at Type A Machines for their collaboration!!

 Meshmixer Patterned Logo with Bunnies

 

Meshmixer also adds some powerful new Patterning techniques with this release, examples shown above, which creates a border based on FaceGroups. We've been having a lot of fun with this new technique to easily create variations of existing models in our library....CHECK IT OUT!

Maker of the Day – Thiago Hersan (Day 21)

Thiago Hersan

Why I make

It helps me think about things and it helps me communicate things about thoughts.

What I make

Installations and apps that deal with mediated spaces in human-human communication; why we communicate, and how. 

Maker of the Day – Zachary Vorhies (Day 20)

Zachary Vorhies

Why I make

I love making wearable fashion! I've always had an interest in the clothes people would make for Burning Man, the most fantastic place on earth (for that week).

One year I met a fashion designer, Wheylan Dean-Ford, who makes costumes for rockstars and movies. He ended up crashing at my house after Burning Man and we got to talking about fashion. He was struggling with putting electronics into his outfits and since I love electronics, I was more than able to help him out. That got us to talking about my own outfit that I wanted to create. The idea that I had was to do a mashup of a glow stick and a CamelBak so we created this thing that called the Hydropak, which is like a CamelBak, but glows to the sound of music.

The Hydropak outfit was a really big hit with my friends and so I started wearing it all the time. One time I wore it to a fashion show and the organizer snapped a picture of me and said, "Who made this amazing outfit?" and I was like, "I did!" He responded, "Why don't you make five more like this and I'll put it on the fashion runway?" 

So I called my designer friend who was living in New York and said, "Hey, want to fly to San Francisco and help me make five outfits for this fashion show?" He was like, "Okay!" So we did it. 

The following week we started a massive one month work session creating five fashion pieces. One of these pieces was the Turn Signal Glove which you can see at: www.futuretechwear.com 

When we showed off the gloves, the response was overwhelming: "YOU MUST MAKE MORE OF THESE TURN SIGNAL GLOVES!" 

So from there on out I was on a mission to create the best cycling glove in the world. I said goodbye to my job at Google and said hello to the wonderful world of entrepreneurship, and the rest is history. 

What I make

Turn Signal Gloves - www.zackees.com
Kickstarter and made $72.5k in sales in just 30 days. CNET said that they were “...enough to encourage a new era of turn signal use.” 

Lightup Outfits - www.futuretechwear.com These are some outfits I created to showcase my talent. 

LED Piano - https://www.youtube.com/watch? v=5V2d0_P9cLo

I designed the electronics and built the software. The fabrication of the piano was carried out by the artist, William Jerome, who also uses it in his performances in his band, Interstellar Transmissions. 

Maker of the Day – Adrian Stein (Day 19)

 

Here is a Maker Of The Day that we have been excited to share with you for some time. Everything that art, 3D printing, and the maker movement is, has revealed itself through the work of this individual. But what can we say about Adrian? In addition to his skills with Meshmixer and 3D manipulation, Mr. Stein is also a gifted writer and speaker, so we will let him speak for himself.

Adrian Stein

Why I make

This is a far too existential of a question for me to answer in short form, my attempt to condense it might be a little confusing, so I apologize in advance. A feeling of cold emptiness takes over my stomach when I become hungry for food, I can stand it, sometimes its hard, but other things distract me. When I have hunger for expression, a feeling of empowering energy, coupled with anxious necessity springs my eyes to an eternal gaze, my throat becomes clogged by the oncoming wave of thought, speaking becomes insufficient, I must make. It helps me clear my mind, by making I am able to see my emotions, feel them physically. Although, sometimes I need to make things that are emotion-less, sometimes making is forgetting, sometimes making is un-making. I came to think of it as my escape, my escape from anything I need to feel; on the other side, it became my gateway, any land I wanted to reach I figured I must make. Making, art, is my therapy. 

What I make

The majority of my practice revolves around the three dimensional object; I find this to be the realm with the least restrictions. There is something incredibly attractive about an object you can touch, smell, interact with, and look at in all angles; it creates an almost intimate dance between the viewer and the piece, creating small conversations, intrapersonal connections, brief moments of intimacy, memories, laughter and cries. Objects have a very interesting power, we deal with them on a daily basis but a lot of us seem to ignore them; when some are presented formally they take on thisrevealing, ephemeral quality. Suddenly, they become easier to “see”, the objects reveal their meaning, information that makes way for different interpretations in every revisit, it is the closest thing to a film for me, without the moving image. I figure that this came from my early addiction to Lego play sets, a driving point for my artistic development. This is where my insatiable thirst saw its beginning, merely satisfied by the low quality, yet nearly endless possibility of these small plastic blocks; I grew to become a creator, continuously imagining and then feverishly making. As I grew older I visited more materials (metal,wood, other brands of building blocks, found objects, clay) yet that thirst got stronger and stronger. It became so fierce that I had begun to loath, even hate, the amount of conformity that my materials involved, the endless drying times, the sometimes irreversible mistakes, the brittleness of some materials and the unbendable stoutness of others, my tongue had become too dry. Therefore I sought a new invigoration, I needed to change by brand of electrolytic buildable. I needed something that could be manipulated with more liberty, something that would set the creatures inside my head free. This made me recede from the physical, and into the virtual; something I found would be a turning point in my practice. Now I almost never leave my computers side, it has become my companion in life, it houses every material I ever dreamed of, any landscape I could imagined, any tool is at my disposal there; but I couldn’t touch it, I couldn’t smell it ,I couldn’t grab it and put it in my pocket, I again became thirsty. This drought did not linger for too long, I quickly crossed paths with the most awe-inspiring bridge i had ever seen, 3D printing. This new discovery completed the circle I wished forever to fulfill; I could finally bring my visions to life. I encountered programs like Meshmixer and Tinkercad, this new virtual clay wouldn’t bend with gravity (if I wanted it to), it could form to my disposal, I can choose where and why it is strong, I can combine it, scale it, transform it, and manipulate it to my will; and then, as if it were straight from the Jetsons, I can print it. Nothing but a dream come true. Currently,with around 4 months in the field, I see my practice voyaging in this fruitful ocean. 

5LDRmH on Make A Gif, Animated Gifs

 

Stay tuned for more coming from this amazing maker - Adrian has been generous enough to keep in great contact with us, and we are looking forward to continuing to share his story with you as it progresses.

 

Here's a sneak peek of what's to come - a bracelet Adrian designed using Meshmixer of the waveform diagram of himself saying the words, "I Love You." Pretty neat, right?

Maker of the Day – Martin Horn (Day 5)

Martin Horn

Why I make

I like making beautiful things. Access to digital fabrication technology made it possible for me to design my work in a software environment & be confident that my tools would create it with a level of precision that would result in a high quality piece. Precise, repeatable results has become much easier as the cost of robotic tools has fallen.

What I make

Laser cut lighting, CNC routed screens & furniture, waterjet cut screens and structures.

Check out Martin's amazing work, like the lamp below, on his website.

Maker of the Day – Ethan Blevins (Day 4)

Ethan Blevins

Why I make

I want to build myself as a creator, Since I was 7 years old I was drawing, and sculpting things by hand out of tinfoil and balls of tape. Now that I'm older I'm trying to continue that passion but with art (having jumped into the digital world). I honestly love the applications provided by Autodesk because they've given me a means to step into this world and build my skills on my own, and I hope to be able to upgrade to using some of the higher end creator tools soon like Maya once I feel my skills and my funds are up to it. 

What I make

I make 3D creatures models using 123D Creature by Autodesk on my iPad. Most of my creations are anthropomorphic in nature, but I love to branch out into unfamiliar territory and broaden my skill base by touching into sculptures I would typically not attempt. 

Meet Tiana – the first Maker of the Day

Welcome to the first installment in our month long project highlighting a unique, creative individual every day. With Maker Faire Bay Area coming to us in just a few short weeks, what better way to celebrate than by showcasing the amazing work coming out of the creative and maker communities?

First up is a tenacious 13-year-old Bay Area resident making her way to college with Tinkercad, jewelry design, and 3D printing. Most kids these days are content to make a few dollars by setting up a lemonade stand on their street corner, or hosting a garage sale with their parents to get rid of old clothes and toys.

Most kids aren’t Tiana.

Tiana

Why I make

I came to Autodesk through the SPARK program, a program that connects youth with corporate mentors for a multi-month apprenticeship. My dad is an architect, so I was familiar with AutoCAD, but once I toured the Autodesk Gallery in San Francisco I became fascinated with 3D printing and realized I could make things, too.

What I make

With Tinkercad I'm able to create personalized designs to my exact specifications. I've designed a line of jewelry - bracelets and earrings - inspired by the human nervous system. I'm going to use what I've learned to raise money for my future college tuition - $1,000,000 to be precise.

To help Tiana get started on her goal we invited her to our Pier 9 workshop to check out what her ideas look like when brought to life with various 3D printers: a MakerBot Replicator 2, and a Connex Objet500.

We believe it is important to encourage young women and men to pursue their creativity, particularly if it's going to support their education and entrepreneurial spirit. Needless to say it was a very exciting experience when Tiana saw the potential of all her hard work come together in real life.

The delight on Tiana's face when experiencing the tangible reality of her imagination was deeply rewarding, and we know that feeling of delight is something that many more of our 123D users will experience when they see their ideas come to life.

Don't worry, the inspiration doesn't stop here: stay tuned for a new maker featured on the 123D blog each day this month!

Autodesk Meshmixer for YOU

We've been ramping up our Meshmixer production lately and released a new update with YOU in mind. See, we are gathering all of your feedback and suggestions and adding it into the application. We are especially excited for the new 3D printing workflows that are coming with each release, some examples below.

Patterned Bunny Pack

Make Slices  

Many of you requested to have 3D printers that we did not list in the pre-populated list of 3D printers. We heard you and decided to let you add your own 3D printer so you can layout and arrange a print job for your specific machine. Its fairly intuitive to set up if you at least know the build volume of your 3D printer.

Here is a list of what's new in Meshmixer 2.3, released yesterday, April 21st:

  • New add/edit custom printer so you can prep your 3D prints for any 3D printer
  • New Make Slices tool: Slice an object into a number flat slices. Two techniques: Stacked or Stacked3D
  • New drag/drop solid objects in addition to parts. Addition of primitives category
  • Added part categories to the Meshmix panel to accommodate growing libraries of parts and solids
  • New Separate Shells tool to separate combined but separate geometry into separate objects
  • Better naming of newly created objects from duplicate, separate, etc…
  • PLY binary format support (which is handy for importing the per-vertex color meshes coming in from depth cameras)
  • 3Dconnexion space mouse support
  • Lots of bug-fixes and stability improvements

By the way, it is now even easier to give us your feedback and suggestions directly from the application! You can see a new menu item named Feedback that you can use to send feedback (good or bad) directly to the developers. With this, you might possibly define some of the next features in the upcoming releases!

How do you use Meshmixer? What would you like to see next?

Pendant

Pendant designed in Meshmixer. A multi-material print on a Stratasys Connex machine

 

Making It Official With 3D Hubs

Every so often two companies meet, and magic happens. This was definitely the case when we met 3D Hubs, the world’s largest 3D print network. We already had so much in common: a love of 3D printing, awesome users and community members, plus a shared mission to provide easy access to a technology that gives you the ultimate form of creativity.
 
 
That’s why it made perfect sense to integrate the 3D Hubs 3D print network into Autodesk 123D, to make it faster and easier than ever for 3D printing enthusiasts everywhere to turn the designs they design into physical products. The average delivery time of products printed via 3D Hubs is less than two days - five times faster than the industry standard.
 
We are committed to offering you the best in 3D printing services, so try them out through our site now, and let us know how it goes. You can also come meet them (and us!) to learn more in person this Friday at a celebration mixer in San Francisco at Autodesk’s One Market office. Sign up here to reserve your spot.
 
Mixer Date and Venue
Autodesk Gallery at One Market
1 Market St #200, San Francisco
Friday, April 11th, 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm PST
 
For our more hands on friends, check out the workshop we will be running with 3D Hubs this Friday as well - but you better hurry; there are only 5 spots left!