LeWeb and the Next 10 Years

Every year thousands of folks gather in Paris, France to discuss the latest innovations coming from the world of technology at a conference called LeWeb. This year marked the 10th year of the LeWeb's operation, and as such they gave the conference a theme of "The Next 10 Years." 

3D printing was one of the major themes of the 3 day conference, with an emphasis on the maker movement and the ability for individuals to fabricate the things they want. There was consensus among the speakers that the way technology is progressing allows for consumers to use readily available software, like Autodesk 123D, and hardware like the UItimaker pictured above to design and improve the products they use. 

Mary Huang of Continuum Fashion presented her innovations in the world of combined fashion + technology. She explained the reality and the potential for people to design the things they want for themselves, without limit, and used her company's products as an example. 

It's exciting to see the subject of the 3D printing technology take its place among mainstream conversations about technology and future trends. As we look ahead towards the next 10 years the opportunities are limitless when it comes to what we can design and create for ourselves with this amazing technology.

Solving Xbox One Problems with Tinkercad and 3D Printing

Tinkercad user ProwlingTiger found himself facing a problem recently: he had an Xbox One Kinect, but no way to keep his new device stable, because TV mounts were sold out everywhere due to the rush of people buying the new console. Instead of going online and spending lots of money + shipping then waiting days for a hard-to-find item to arrive, ProwlingTiger made his way to Tinkercad and created what he needed instead.

Knowing other people might be having the same issue with finding a suitable mount, he shared the link to his 3D model, made for printing on a Makerbot, with Reddit, where he was quickly inundated with requests to purchase his creation. This led to him opening up an Etsy store so anyone without access to a 3D printer can buy the mount he created.

It's awesome seeing what creative folks do when faced with a problem, as well as to see how quickly other people can benefit from it. Fortunately it doesn't take lots of engineering degrees or extensive training to get to this point - as we can see below, anyone with a desire to make things will find a way to do so:

This is a great example of how 3D printing technology can make our lives a lot simpler. We look forward to seeing what ProwlingTiger and all of our other Tinkercad and 123D users will show us next.

 

123D Creations with Dazed and Confused: The Fourth and Final Installment

Here is the fourth and final installment in the collaborative Dazed and Confused series where we joined up with four world-renowned artists to see what each of their unique sets of creativity, insight and skills would create with our products. It is not often that a project this unique and amazing comes along, and we are sad that this is the last in the series.

This segment focuses on Ana Rajcevic. Ana is an award-winning fashion artist whose work spans sculpture and fashion design. A constant theme in her work is the transformation of the human body through complex adornments or body-sculptures. She seeks to exhibit the duality of "fashion artefacts" in he artwork, and the final result of her 123D creation exhibits the "mutation and evolution" of her creative practice. 

Using 123D Catch Ana designed an insect-inspired hairlike facade, 800 hairs to be precise, to a hand-sculpted life-size headpiece. These hairs were too fine to be crafted without the use of technology, but were no problem for 123D Catch, so they were 3D printed. Despite the riskiness of the project and the challenges faced by the 3D printers in bringing the sculpture to life, "the look on Ana's face when she admires her 'artificial exoskeleton' catching the light in her studio is proof positive of the power of 3D printing to astound even a seasoned professional in materials design."

Check out the video below for more details

 

 

It has been a wonderful and rewarding experience seeing what these four talented artists can do when handed the reins to 3D printing technology by Autodesk 123D, and we are excited to see how this project inspired our other 123D users in their approach to 3D design and art.

Autodesk University: In the Can.

 

Thanks everyone who dropped by the Creative Studio this past week at Autodesk University in Las Vegas!

We had a great week and enjoyed talking to you.  There's lots of exciting things on the horizon for Autodesk and all our customers, and we're looking forward to next year.  

In spite of the apparent possibility of building a crossbow that will puncture a trash can with wooden skewers, we didn't even have any (serious) injuries from the Office Warfare table!  So all in all, we think it was a success!

Remember: "What happens in Vegas...", BUT if you have any great memories of the conference, let us know!

123D Creations with Dazed and Confused: Part 3

This week brings us the third installment in the 123D Creations series with Dazed and Confused. For this project London-based artist Yuri Pattison took a closer look at the Chelyabinsk Meteor that lit up Russia's sky for a brief moment in February 2013. He became fascinated with the subsequent "fragments of meteor" that appeared for sale on eBay at a much higher cost than other meteorites online.  

Using the photos from the eBay listings, Yuri created 3D models on 123D Catch, despite not having every angle necessary to create a perfect capture. He then printed 3D models of the meteorites, inconsistencies included, to emphasize the "example of traditional culture fetishizing the 'original' object,” wherein the representation of the object becomes just as valuable, if not more so, than the original object despite not being the real thing. Through 3D printing technology Yuri is able to bring his vision to life. See more details in the video below and by reading the Dazed article about the project.

 

In this digital age, there is no doubt that the lines between original and re-creation are becoming blurred. Yuriy states, "That's what's interesting about digital for me, and the possibilities of reproduction like 3D printing: the information contained and conveyed is the most important thing rather than copy vs original!"

123D Creations with Dazed and Confused: Part 2

Today we bring you part 2 of our installment on 123D Creations with Dazed and Confused. This week's focus is on world renowned artist Clement Valla. Clement has been a long time researcher into technology and its role in Fine Art and creative expression. When working with 123D Catch he became inspired by the "texture maps" that exist in the intermediary between capturing a 3D image and refining said image. 

 

 

Ultimately what Valla communicates is the apophenia, or "the very human tendency to see meaningful patterns in noise, such as faces in clouds," that exists in the 123D Catch capture process. For more details on this amazing project, visit Dazed online.

Merci Beaucoup! 3D Print Show Paris All Wrapped Up.

Whoo - after a long week of flying and chunneling, we ended a great week of 3D Print Shows.  London was very exciting, with people from all over coming to say hi and learn more about 3D modeling. 

Based in the Carrousel de Louvre, it was essentially a remix of the London show, only with a lot more French. By the end of the week, my technical (if not conversational) French was parfait, but fortunately, our awesome Paris Autodesk staff came by to help bridge the language barrier.

Some attendees were professionals looking for new ways to model, like with MeshMixer or 123D Make, others just wandered in from the Louvre, not knowing what they were getting themselves into.  But in all, the show was a success and it fit nicely in one of the oldest museums in Europe.

Thanks to everyone who came by - maybe we'll see you next year!