Fab10 Barcelona

 

Autodesk was pleased to be a primary sponsor and an award giver for the inaugural Fab Awards, at the 10th annual Fab Lab Conference in Barcelona, Spain. According to their website, "FAB10Barcelona is a one week series of events focused on open and accessible technologies that will change the world. It gathers the Fab Lab Network and the citizens of Barcelona to make it a FAB City." 

Competition was fierce with over 100 excellent submissions from dozens of countries!  Most projects included their source files, so you can even make them yourself: https://www.fab10.org/en/awards

Below you can see all of the winners:

Sénamé Koffi and his team of architects & engineers from Lomé, Togo. After buying a 3D printer for their new makerspace WoeLab, they looked around and realized they already had the parts to build their next 3D printing machine.

Every year, 515 tons of broken gadgets get shipped to West Africa, where young workers burn the equipment to salvage materials like gold and copper in a dangerously toxic environment. But there’s a lot of craft and engineering that goes into electronic components, all of which is wasted when things gets melted down for scrap.  WoeLab manager Dodji Honou says the members of WoeLab asked themselves, “how can we create something of our own using what we have around us?”

Using the frame of an old desktop computer, iron rails from discarded printers, and one new Arduino board, WoeLab member Afate Gnikou invented the W.Afate 3D printer—which won First Place in the Fab Awards.

“With an old thing and a good idea,” says Honou, “you can make a solution.”

 

Second prize went to another new idea inspired by old electronics: the Ag Inkjet Circuit (AgIC) was developed by Yoshihiro Kawahara from the University of Tokyo, in collaboration with Microsoft Research Cambridge and Georgia Institute of Technology. "Ag" is the chemical symbol for silver, and this brilliant invention uses conductive silver ink to turn ordinary inkjet printers into circuit board manufacturers. To quote the AgIC website: “Say goodbye to breadboard.”

 

In third place we have the 3D Printed Prosthetics initiative at Fab Lab San Diego in California, USA, with Katie Rast presenting their innovative Gladius prosthetic leg design and their initiative to support 3D-printed hands.  Most prosthetic legs are specialized in their use so people require multiple prosthetics for different activities, but this new design provides an all-in-one solution for running or walking on different terrains.

3D printed prosthetics have an advantage over traditional designs because they are a fraction of the cost and they can easily be tailor-made. Initiatives like Fab Lab San Diego and eNABLE connect 3D printers to people who need prosthetic hands, while providing simple software for customizing hands to fit their users.

 

 

Autodesk had an award to present, and it went to the Waag Society’s inventive and customizable low-cost prosthesis. This prosthetic leg is a collaboration between Dutch and Indonesian designers, using locally-available materials like pineapple tree fibers and bamboo, a realistic alternative for people without access to MRI's and industrialized technology.

 

A popular vote awarded FabPonics from Puerto Rico the Audience Choice Prize. Their clever aquaponics design brings urban farming to the Caribbean, and uses digital fabrication to easily manufacture systems for incorporating fish tanks and water filtration into small farming modules.

Overall it was an amazing and inspiring event full of innovative people and brand new ideas. If you want to get involved in events like this, consider creating your own projects! You can even get started right here on 123D

Meet Tiana – the first Maker of the Day

Welcome to the first installment in our month long project highlighting a unique, creative individual every day. With Maker Faire Bay Area coming to us in just a few short weeks, what better way to celebrate than by showcasing the amazing work coming out of the creative and maker communities?

First up is a tenacious 13-year-old Bay Area resident making her way to college with Tinkercad, jewelry design, and 3D printing. Most kids these days are content to make a few dollars by setting up a lemonade stand on their street corner, or hosting a garage sale with their parents to get rid of old clothes and toys.

Most kids aren’t Tiana.

Tiana

Why I make

I came to Autodesk through the SPARK program, a program that connects youth with corporate mentors for a multi-month apprenticeship. My dad is an architect, so I was familiar with AutoCAD, but once I toured the Autodesk Gallery in San Francisco I became fascinated with 3D printing and realized I could make things, too.

What I make

With Tinkercad I'm able to create personalized designs to my exact specifications. I've designed a line of jewelry - bracelets and earrings - inspired by the human nervous system. I'm going to use what I've learned to raise money for my future college tuition - $1,000,000 to be precise.

To help Tiana get started on her goal we invited her to our Pier 9 workshop to check out what her ideas look like when brought to life with various 3D printers: a MakerBot Replicator 2, and a Connex Objet500.

We believe it is important to encourage young women and men to pursue their creativity, particularly if it's going to support their education and entrepreneurial spirit. Needless to say it was a very exciting experience when Tiana saw the potential of all her hard work come together in real life.

The delight on Tiana's face when experiencing the tangible reality of her imagination was deeply rewarding, and we know that feeling of delight is something that many more of our 123D users will experience when they see their ideas come to life.

Don't worry, the inspiration doesn't stop here: stay tuned for a new maker featured on the 123D blog each day this month!

Autodesk Meshmixer for YOU

We've been ramping up our Meshmixer production lately and released a new update with YOU in mind. See, we are gathering all of your feedback and suggestions and adding it into the application. We are especially excited for the new 3D printing workflows that are coming with each release, some examples below.

Patterned Bunny Pack

Make Slices  

Many of you requested to have 3D printers that we did not list in the pre-populated list of 3D printers. We heard you and decided to let you add your own 3D printer so you can layout and arrange a print job for your specific machine. Its fairly intuitive to set up if you at least know the build volume of your 3D printer.

Here is a list of what's new in Meshmixer 2.3, released yesterday, April 21st:

  • New add/edit custom printer so you can prep your 3D prints for any 3D printer
  • New Make Slices tool: Slice an object into a number flat slices. Two techniques: Stacked or Stacked3D
  • New drag/drop solid objects in addition to parts. Addition of primitives category
  • Added part categories to the Meshmix panel to accommodate growing libraries of parts and solids
  • New Separate Shells tool to separate combined but separate geometry into separate objects
  • Better naming of newly created objects from duplicate, separate, etc…
  • PLY binary format support (which is handy for importing the per-vertex color meshes coming in from depth cameras)
  • 3Dconnexion space mouse support
  • Lots of bug-fixes and stability improvements

By the way, it is now even easier to give us your feedback and suggestions directly from the application! You can see a new menu item named Feedback that you can use to send feedback (good or bad) directly to the developers. With this, you might possibly define some of the next features in the upcoming releases!

How do you use Meshmixer? What would you like to see next?

Pendant

Pendant designed in Meshmixer. A multi-material print on a Stratasys Connex machine

 

Making a Super Nintendo USB case with Tinkercad

 

One of the greatest aspects of the holidays, birthdays, and other special events is the opportunity to give someone a meaningful gift. Tinkercad user Matt Mustarde was faced with the question of what to get his younger brother for his 13th birthday, an age that is considered a milestone for many people. Matt, a Washington State University student, took to Tinkercad and applied his mind towards solving the problem of what to get his brother.

Armed with a standard 32GB flashdrive, a Printrbot+, and Tinkercad, Matt designed a USB case shaped like an Super Nintendo (SNES) controller, knowing his brother is a huge fan of video games. Matt also went the extra step and pre-loaded the flashdrive with lots of games for his brother to play.

I had a chance to speak with Matt to learn more about his creative process:

"I really just wanted to make something special for my brother! He loves computer games but has a crappy laptop so I figured I'd aggregate the best games and put it on a cool custom drive. The actual designing took about a day, I used an actual SNES controller and made a vector of it to get the profile just right. That's why I used Tinkercad, because it's so convenient for importing vectors and making simple models."

 

When I asked Matt about his history with 3D printing, he told me, "I've been printing for about 2 years now, originally on my robotics team's printer. I bought a Printrbot+ kit back in February and love it. Basically I'm just a student with a hobby and love sharing my work." And of course, in true Maker fashion, Matt has been kind enough to share his design with the community through Thingiverse

This is the kind of story we love to hear, where 3D design and printing inspires creativity in people and they share it with the world. Thanks to Matt for sharing your experience with us - we can't wait to see what you do next!

 

 

How a young boy is using Tinkercad to help the world see

Meet Ritik Mehta, a 13-year-old 3D printing enthusiast with a big heart.

Ritik has grown up in a world where it is possible to 3D print your dream designs at home with the help of easy-to-use 3D design software applications such as Tinkercad. Like the other kids of this 3D printing generation he’s taking the first step of many more to move towards a world where people help each other with 3D printed goodness.

Lately he has been very engaged in making his own custom glasses. This gave him the idea to provide an opportunity to everybody to own customized glasses and, at the same time, be part of a unique charity to help kids in Africa and Asia see the world as they should.

 

And just like that with the help of his father, he turned his idea into reality; so if you are in the Antwerp, Belgium area on Saturday December 21st, make sure to stop by Designcenter de Winkelhaak to see Ritik's vision come to life. Here you will be able to make your own custom glasses from the 3D design to the 3D printed model. Professional designers and 3D printing experts will assist you, and the money made from the event will go straight to ‘Eyes for the World’, an important non-profit foundation which believes that everyone, all over the world, has the right to see well.

Join us in helping Ritik show that money is no object when it comes to how 3D printing technology can benefit everyone.

Solving Xbox One Problems with Tinkercad and 3D Printing

Tinkercad user ProwlingTiger found himself facing a problem recently: he had an Xbox One Kinect, but no way to keep his new device stable, because TV mounts were sold out everywhere due to the rush of people buying the new console. Instead of going online and spending lots of money + shipping then waiting days for a hard-to-find item to arrive, ProwlingTiger made his way to Tinkercad and created what he needed instead.

Knowing other people might be having the same issue with finding a suitable mount, he shared the link to his 3D model, made for printing on a Makerbot, with Reddit, where he was quickly inundated with requests to purchase his creation. This led to him opening up an Etsy store so anyone without access to a 3D printer can buy the mount he created.

It's awesome seeing what creative folks do when faced with a problem, as well as to see how quickly other people can benefit from it. Fortunately it doesn't take lots of engineering degrees or extensive training to get to this point - as we can see below, anyone with a desire to make things will find a way to do so:

This is a great example of how 3D printing technology can make our lives a lot simpler. We look forward to seeing what ProwlingTiger and all of our other Tinkercad and 123D users will show us next.

 

123D Creations with Dazed and Confused

By now you've likely heard about the brand new 123D Catch for iOS 7 - it makes turning photographs into detailed 3D models even faster and easier - read more about the improvements here.

To celebrate the release we want to share an amazing story that combines the technology of 123D Catch with the beauty of art by announcing 123D Creations! This project comes in collaboration with our friends over at Dazed and Confused, and together we embarked on a journey with four artists to explore their creativity using 3D design and printing technology. Over the next month we will share how the artists have used the Autodesk 123D suite to express themselves. 

For the first installation, artist Lawrence Lek opted to use 123D Catch to create a piece he calls "KI$$." Check out the video below to see how Lek transformed his vision into a tangible reality using 123D Catch.

 

 

Isn't that amazing? Head over to Dazed for more details, and don't forget to keep checking back here for upcoming projects over the next few weeks!

 

 

3D Printing and Biotech

I think we all know that those of us on the 123D team are stoked about 3D printing - why else would we be in this business, after all? We love seeing the amazing ideas that our community designs and brings to life, as they consistently challenge our notions about just how far 3D printing can reach. 

One of the places that 3D printing is venturing into right now is the medical world, and this is a pairing we are so excited to learn more about. The humanitarian components of 3D printing have already had a huge impact, from reducing costs and time spent on various medical practices to providing a means for rapid prototyping that allows makers to rely on themselves rather than corrupt or unresponsive systems.

A key aspects of this movement is that it is being powered by individuals in addition to companies. Makers are using their personal 3D printers to drastically improve the landscape around them, like this hackerspace in Haiti creating and improving umbilical cord clamps. Doing so allows them to avoid going the traditional manufacturing route for medical products that are sorely needed.

From makezine.com

Another innovation in the world of personal medical 3D printing is in the realm of prosthetics. Right now the average prosthetic to replace a limb costs upwards of $100,000, and isn’t necessarily made to fit the body of the person who it will belong to. For children the process of replacing limbs gets even more complicated, because kids grow so quickly. This leads to them having to pay $100,000 way too frequently for a prosthetic that will quickly become too tight, and therefore cause pain and decrease function. Read this touching story to see just how much 3D printing will influence the life of a 2 year old girl in need of prosthetic hands.

 

From robohand.net 

Imagine a world where medical technology is innovated by those who it impacts most, those who understand the implications of one minor change. It's exciting to be in a time where this world is becoming a reality, and we are extra excited that our software can help play a role. 

Have you ever thought about applying your 3D printing skills towards the advancement of medicine? We would love to hear about your ideas in the comments. 

Fashion and your 3D Printer

The greatest thing about 3D printing technology is being able to design and refine the products you want to create. This has led to innovations across technologies, from 3D printing prosthetic limbs to aiding astronauts at the International Space Station.

But 3D Printing is bringing industries that have not traditionally existed in the 3D realm to the forefront of new technology. Fashion is quickly making a name for itself by bringing clothing, jewelry, shoes, sunglasses, and more to the 3D world. Designers are innovating left and right, using their 3D printers to accommodate a more customer-centric approach, like Continuum which lets customers design and personalize their garments before they get printed, like the shoes below. Even companies like Makerbot and Materialise are on board with making 3D fashion available to all, acknowledging that, "ready-to-wear 3D-printed clothing is fast becoming an influential force in the world of fashion."

 

 from www.designboom.com

 

The Huffington Post makes a well-informed prediction: “As the technology advances and prices continue to drop, everyday Internet users may soon start drawing their wardrobes on a desktop.” With 3D design software becoming more accessible to individuals, as opposed to just professionals, there are fewer obstacles than ever create what you want for yourself with minimal costs. Whether it’s printing a pair of shoes to go perfectly with an outfit you bought, or designing a necklace for your friend’s birthday present, it’s clear that 3D printing technology has evolved beyond the exclusive realm of the professional into the hands of makers, creators, and DIYers.

 

from www.shapeways.com

 

3D printing technology is already changing the fashion world, so head over to the 123D gallery to get inspired and join the movement. You can grab yourself a pair of cufflinks while you're there - or better yet, make your own!

 

by vizfab

Bring 3D Printing With You To College

We imagine our college-aged audience has spent the past few days and weeks getting settled into the joys of sharing a dorm room with strangers while navigating what it's like to live away from home. With all the details that come inherent to making that transition, it’s understandable when you leave something at home or think of something you need when it’s too late to get it.  

For example, perhaps you get to your dorm and realize your parents have supplied you with roughly one metric ton of pens and pencils, but nowhere to put them. They have already driven back home with their credit cards, leaving you to your own devices, but fortunately 123D and 3D Printing are there to fill in the gaps.

For example, instead of quietly stealing a pencil holder from your roommate, use 123D Catch to capture his/hers and print it, or select from the multitude of options developed by your fellow 123D’ers, like the cannon pencil holder picture here:

 

Courtesy of xyzebra 

If you’re a person who goes through lots of drafts, nothing is more satisfying than tossing out failed ideas. Spice up that process by using 123D Design to create, and then 3D print your own basketball hoop for the trash can, gamifying your editorial process.

 

Courtesy of Kazga_Fitteyai 

 Playing with a Frisbee (or novelty flying disc) is one of the stereotypical college activities that must be undertaken. Customize your own plastic disc in 123D Design and everyone will want to hang out with you.

 

Courtesy of CocaKoala 

One of the hardest parts of college is surviving homesickness, so we recommend you use 123D Sculpt to design and print your dog (or other pet). Having a small version of Fido with you in college is a great way to keep your home close to your heart, and realistically is probably about as far as one should go with pet ownership when it comes to dorm life anyway.

 

 Courtesy of Chuck Whitehead

So when you’re low on funds, which after all is the identifying characteristic of college students worldwide, consult Autodesk 123D to find and create quick solutions to life’s little problems. Whether it’s an issue of function, entertainment, or making friends, 123D is here to help.  Find your school's 3D printer and start filling your dorm room with the coolest stuff you can think of!