From the Makers: Tinkercad to 3D print!

Lining up at the gate for Maker Faire Rome 2014At the last couple of Maker Faire events, lots of people told us how they used Tinkercad for all their 3D printing. We're so honored to have such loyal users!   I thought I'd reflect here on some of the most popular features, in case some of you weren't aware.  Anything I missed? Screen Shot 2014-10-04 at 7.05.01 AM- Water-Tight STL files
Tinkercad is great as a last point of prep before sending a model to the printer.  The Import function can make the most stubborn files magically heal themselves, allowing you to re-export or add a solid base for stability.

 

Screen Shot 2014-10-04 at 6.52.07 AM - Direct to 3D print service capability.
A couple of clicks is all that stands between you and a full color print of your model (or Peter D. Penguin).  Just go to Design > Order a 3D Print.  

 

SVG Import
You can import a line drawing in an SVG file format to extrude right in Tinkercad (or even 123D Design).  

 

- Slicing a Larger Print for Sectional Printing.
We covered this in a recent TinkerTip, but using 2 boxes as holes allows you to keep a clean seam when breaking up a larger model into multiple prints.  

Maker Faire New York – it’s a wrap!

In continuation with our coverage of Maker Faire New York, check out the photos below! Maker Faire is always a good time, and this year's festival in New York was no exception. Tinkercad, Instructables, 123D Circuits, and more attracted new makers, long time designers, families, and guests from all over the place to the Autodesk booth. It was wonderful to meet such diverse groups of people all delighting in the joys of 3D printing and making things.

 

Our troop of Peter the Penguins were especially popular!

 

Community Manager Andy Taylor showed some awesome live demos of Tinkercad, going with the theme of DC Comics - below you can see Peter the Penguin being transformed into The Flash!

 

Thanks to everyone for another great year! It was wonderful getting to meet so many of you, from educators to long time Autodesk users, and we can't wait to see you again next year.

#NationOfMakers

 

It's official. President Obama has declared June 18, 2014 the National Day of Makers. This is no surprise, given that a revolution is taking place, where we are going back to our roots and creating things for ourselves. Borne from a Nation of Makers, we have become a #NationOfMakers.

"Our Nation is home to a long line of innovators who have fueled our economy and transformed our world. Through the generations, American inventors have lit our homes, propelled humanity into the skies, and helped people across the planet connect at the click of a button...During the National Day of Making, we celebrate and carry forward this proud tradition.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim June 18, 2014, as National Day of Making. I call upon all Americans to observe this day with programs, ceremonies, and activities that encourage a new generation of makers and manufacturers to share their talents and hone their skills." 

In honor of this declaration, the home of the President is hosting its first ever White House Maker Faire, a day dedicated to showcasing and celebrating all the talent being driven by the Maker Movement. 

You can get involved by seeing what others have made, making things yourself,  by following along with the events of the day, and by signing this pledge dedicating yourself to "working together to build maker communities throughout America and the world that introduce the maker movement to more people and expand the benefits that makers can realize through their participation."

But most importantly, you can get out there and have fun! Enjoy this National Day of Makers, everyone. And don't forget to find yourself on the map below...

 

 

Maker of the Day – Jane Chen (Day 6)

Jane Chen

Why I make

To make social impact by providing healthcare to places in need.

What I make

Low cost baby warmers to help babies in developing countries.

Here is a great example of purposeful design, or using design as a means to catalyze change. Jane has a rich history with nonprofit organizations on healthcare issues in developing countries, and now with Embrace she is able to do that in an extremely tangible way.

The Embrace Warmer started as a class project at Stanford University when a group of graduate students, including Jen, were challenged to design an intervention for neonatal hypothermia that cost less than 1% of the price of a state-of-the-art incubator.

Jane's work goes to show how the spirit of making can lead to life-changing inventions. Using resources like Techshop, you too can make things that change the world. Get making, everyone!

Calling all makers, calling all makers!

So here's the thing - you guys are awesome. Every day you show us new ways of looking at 3D printing and creativity, and we want to celebrate everything you do by featuring you on our website! With the Bay Area Maker Faire coming up in May, there is no better time to make that happen. 

Submit your work by filling out our very quick survey here for the opportunity to be one of our Makers of the Day, like Ritik, who 3D printed the glasses above!

 

Top 5 3D Printing Features in the new Autodesk Meshmixer

 

Autodesk Meshmixer free all-in-one 3D printing application

Autodesk Meshmixer free all-in-one 3D printing and more application.

Autodesk Meshmixer updated today with a nice all-in-one suite for 3D printing, making it the ultimate free sculpting, mixing, painting, 3D printing application out there. Most notably, when you are ready to print your multi-mesh mashup, you can click the "Print" button which loads an arsenal of simple analysis and layout tools to arrange, heal, and even print directly to a 3D printer. See the video below for an quick teaser of what is new.

 The integration with 3D printers is intended to make the process to 3D printing even more streamlined. The healing tools require no training at all and will make just about any model printable. If you want to save time and material, then you can give your model a wall thickness so that it's hollow inside. Also, the generation of support material is an artform in itself. Of course, the experienced Meshmixer users can still find their original re-meshing, sculpting and healing tools they have grown to love for that extra level of control.

With all that in mind, here are my Top 5 Meshmixer Features for anyone interested in 3D printing.

5. New feature: "Make Solid". Now you can mash a bunch of meshes together and use "Make Solid" to heal them all together into a 3D printable object. See my Danielle Steele-like book cover I whipped together below from some 123D Catch captures I downloaded from 123dapp.com.

Make Solid

Make Solid makes these 123D Catch captures watertight!

 

4. Automatic repairing (I counted 1 click!). Whether it be a messy, unprintable model or you just want a sanity check for 3D printing your refined creation. The addition of an option to automatically "Repair Selected" is an easy hands free way to make any model 3D printable. Find it in the print bed layout screen.

3. "Hollow with Wall Thickness" will save you time and material when printing. Essentially giving your model a wall thickness that you decide, making it a hollow print rather than a solid print with infill. You can visualize how thick your model is with the slick see-through representation.

2. Analysis tools: Strength, Stability, and Slicing. This unique set of tools is perfect for visualizing how your printed model will look and perform before printing it. My favorite is the "Stability" tool where I can make sure my print will stand upright. Using this, I can push the limits of how I mix and sculpt, ensuring the printed object will not topple over!

1. Print direct to your 3D printer (Windows 8.1 supported). Windows 8.1 users will have the option to print directly to their printer, bypassing the need to go through another app such as Makerware, eliminating this extra step.

Don't take my word for it, try it for yourself...its free for Mac or Windows (32/64 bit) at its brand new page: 123dapp.com/meshmixer.

Tokyo Maker Faire

Maker Faires are in full swing around the world, and Autodesk 123D got in on the action this weekend in Tokyo, Japan, a city renowned for its history of innovation. 

Carl Bass, CEO of Autodesk, even got in the action, delivering a presentation on "the appearance of new manufacturing in North America."

 

The 123D team hosted an area equipped with MakerBots, iPads with all the 123D tools installed, interlock assemblies, LED badges, duct tape bags, a black rocket shelf, and even a 3D photo booth. 

 

 It's so rewarding to see firsthand how people incorporate the 123D tools into their personal creative expression. Thank you to the thousands of smiling people of all ages that came to visit and create with us! We can't wait to do it again next year, Tokyo Maker Faire!

 

Shanghai Maker Carnival

 

This past weekend the 123D Shanghai team sponsored the biggest maker gathering of  2013 at the Shanghai Maker Carnival.

 

We set up a big booth and brought all of our 123D products, Instructables, and VEX Assembler to introduce them to the Chinese makers, professors, students, parents, and kids in attendance. 

 

Over the span of two days our booth got thousands of visitors, allowing us to meet so many people. We even had one of our product managers, Guillermo, deliver a speech that was very warmly received by the audience.

 

Seeing everyone's happy, smiling faces as they engaged with our products and organization was very exciting. Check out the picture below to see the happiness for yourself!

 

 

 

East Bay Mini Maker Faire

 

The spirit of making was alive and well at the East Bay Mini Maker Faire this last weekend, with thousands of people gathering to explore the innovations and creativity of local Bay Area folks. Children of all ages explored hands-on exhibits from beekeeping, to 3D printing, to large-scale pyrotechnics.

 

Caution: awesome

 

There was something for everyone

 

As 3D printing enthusiasts ourselves, it was especially exciting seeing kids not only interested in learning more about 3D printing, but taking to it so quickly that it was almost like a second nature to them. In addition to playing with 3D printed objects and watching the various 3D printers do their thing, they logged into the 3D design software and started creating their own ideas without any instruction. It was amazing!

 

It was inspiring seeing how quickly the next generation is taking to having a hand in the world around them. All in all it was a great day of learning, sharing, and making under the warm Oakland sun! 

 

Bringing the museum home with you (legally) with 123D Catch

 Guardian Lion courtesy of Asian Art Museum SF

As product manager of 123D Catch, I’m always curious how this powerful little app is being used. Lately, I’ve seen a boom in use of 123D Catch at museums. It is a great app to help truly study a piece in a collection and understand a master’s intention. Putting in the extra credit to heal and 3D print a captured piece can be especially rewarding in this regard.

See a few examples here of taking the museum home with you by way of this handy iPhone/iPad app.

Here is a piece on Gizmodo about a recent 3D Printing Camp where kids are using the 123D Catch iPhone/iPad app to scan dinosaur bones at the American Museum of Natural History in NY: http://gizmodo.com/amnh-3d-printing-camp-lets-make-some-dinos-868773820

Another from Techcrunch of an individual using Google Glass to snap photos at Walters Art Museum to capture a sculpture. Photos can then be uploaded via the web app or Windows app: http://techcrunch.com/2013/06/28/maker-nabs-a-3d-model-of-marcus-aurelius-with-google-glass/

Of course each museum will have its limitations on what you can capture in 3D and what your intentions are with the captured piece from their collection or a temporary installation. Best to know their take on it before you recreate these masterpieces.

So, if you want to try it out, I’ve created three videos to show how you might do this yourself. Go from shooting photographs of your favorite piece in a collection to 3D printing it with a 3D printing service easily. Many thanks to the Asian Art Museum SF for lending their pieces to capture!

Its as easy as 1…2…3D print!

Step 1: Use the iPhone or iPad app to shoot photographs sequentially around your subject. Here, I use my SLR camera and upload them using the web app:

Step 2: Use the editing and healing capabilities of the 123D Catch web app to clean up and prepare your capture for 3D printing.

 

Step 3: 3D print your capture using a 3D printing service directly from within the 123D Catch web app!! You can choose from iMaterialise, Shapeways, or Sculpteo, and each has an interesting assortment of material options, including plastics, metals, and ceramic to name a few.

 

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