Notable New Yorkers – Stern Design Works

Okay, so we know you've heard about dynamic maker duo Cameron and Rebecca Stern of Stern Design Works, whether it was on from the Maker of the Day feature back in May, more recently through 3DRV, or even way back from Reddit. We caught up with them in New York to learn more about how 3D printing has changed the way they create their products, and learned about the advice they give to new users of 3D printing technology.

 

Watch the video below to see the whole interview.

 

 

To learn more or to get in contact with this awesome husband and wife team, visit their website at: http://sterndesignworks.com/

Adafruit’s 3D Printed Retro Mari Clouds

Adafruit #3DThursday

123D Superstar users Noe and Pedro Ruiz of Adafruit Industries are back with another awesome 3D printing + electronics hybrid project - and they've published the files on our site with instructions.  


You can watch these guys whip up 3D printed projects LIVE every 3D Thursday, but today we've posted this great video their latest project.  Scroll down for everything you need to build it yourself!

Check out Adafruit's detailed instruction page for the step-by-step instructions and links to their electronics shop.


The "Mari Clouds"  enclosure was modeled in our free 3D modeling software called 123D Design (click to download).  You can find the original design files and ready-to-3D print files on the Mari Clouds Project Page on our site, 123Dapp.com.  While you're there check out Adafruit's other awesome projects on 123Dapp.com.


We love talking about Noe and Pedro's projects.  If you have something you'd like us to feature just drop us your info at our get-featured page!

Down the Creature Feedr Hole.

Have you seen the Creature Feedr Tumblr yet?   It's pretty great.

So far, 4 of our most prolific users have created video of their process with 123D Creature to share. Each artist has a different process, and it's kind of fascinating to see how they approach each of their creations.  Also, all the Creature Feedrs get a 3D print from our friends at Sculpteo!

 

                             

Adam Beamish starts deceptively simply, choosing to manipulate the wireframe into a generic bust before baking.  From there, it's all tweaking and surface manipulation to create his amazing characters.

 

Cecelia Gaxiola and Michael Whiteside use the wire skeleton much more to outline their creations and use color to enhance later.

 

Check out the newest from Joe Batty - this may be the cutest Creature so far.

We also post great models we see in the 123D gallery pretty regularly.  My hands-down favorite so far is the Simpsons series by cRe@YvEs.  Though, Marge is a little risque (not necessarily a bad thing).

Want to submit a Creature? Just click submit at the top of the Feedr page or go here!

The Mighty Midwest Presents: Adrian Stein

 

For our final installment of the Mighty Midwest we revisit talented student artist, Adrian Stein. In May he stole the spotlight as a featured Maker of The Day and Meshmixer super user so we wanted to delve deeper into his story to share it with you. With thoughts like, "Hearts are wild creatures; that’s why our ribs are cages,” it's no surprise that his physical artwork evokes a whole new level of imagination that he chooses to express through 3D printing.

We met with Adrian at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago back in February, and more recently our friends in the 3DRV, which is currently crisscrossing the country, had the chance to sit down with him for a follow up - see the video below for a peek into the wonderful mind of Adrian Stein.

 

 

Looking into Adrian's artistic process revealed a poetic approach that can best be described in his own words:

"As my research progresses, I have found that most designs have a lack of connectedness to the nature of music, or sound. I have tried to approach the matter scientifically, and creatively, with an original intent to engage a design that is both feral and endearing; two characteristics that I encountered in nature, in her species, and in the passive-aggressive dances that her children made. The sounds and compositions from animals around the world are arranged in order to establish presence, attraction or repulsion; Hence I found much inspiration from the study of mating rituals in the wild; it is quite fascinating how alike we are to all species in this earth. Something that transcends in the mating rituals of most species, including our own, is the ritualistic aspect of the mating mannerisms, coupled with loud bluster, or soft melody; A preparation, an interaction, responses from both parties, climax, and eventually a separation (biological or eventual). As so, I have chosen two options for the sound-wave designs, one consists of the extremely complex mating call of the Lyrebird, the Mockingbirds big brother, and another is a song which either speaks of love or is love inspired. Depending on the final choice, I will modify the aesthetics of this to fit."

With this inspiration in mind, Adrian looked within himself and created a 3D model based on his own voice saying, "I Love You." He shaped the resulting waveform diagram into the shape of a bracelet (which you can see below,) creating an idea that can be replicated by lovers everywhere. 

3D printing of waveform I Love You

You can (and should) keep up with Adrian's work via his Tumblr blog, and be sure to keep on the lookout for more features on him here. This is one artist you don't want to miss.

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Thank you so much for joining us on this journey through the Midwest. It has been a real to treat to report on how Chicago is driving the maker movement. Check out our other stories coming out of the Midwest, such as the Art Institute of Chicago, Tom Burtonwood, and the Chicago Public Library. Be sure to stick around as we begin exploring other cities and regions to bring you more news on innovations in 3D printing and making worldwide.

Maker of the Day – Domenic di Giorgio (Day 31)

 

 

Domenic di Giorgio

Why I make

When I look at something that interests me my first thought is always  "How could I make that?"

It becomes a challenge and an exciting chance to learn something. A new technique or material or technology.

Recently I have become obsessed with making tools to help makers make more. In particular a low-cost laser cutter/engraver. I enjoy watching makers take tools and use them in ways they were never imagined to be used in.

Very inspiring.

 

What I make

These days with the tools we (makers) have available to us, I can say that I make "Whatever I want to" 

I started making gliders and planes out of balsa and tissue paper when I was young and my need to make things grew and grew.. Now I use composite materials, cnc machines, 3d printers and laser cutters! Times and technology may have changed, but the feeling of having made something from start to finish never changes. 

I enjoy experimenting with cad, electronics, programming, robotics as well as getting my hands dirty on a lathe or mill.

I make things that capture my interests. 3d printed arduino controlled robotic arms, useless-machines in Pringles cans, tools to help me make more things. 

Too much to make and just not enough time!

 

 

Maker of the Day – Timothy Englert (Day 30)

 

 

Timothy Englert

Why I make

We are a society increasingly distancing itself from actual hands-on making of objects.  When I was a boy, everyone took shop class, and made a box, a bread basket, a cutting board, or a pencil holder as their first piece.  Our great-randfathers built their own homes, and a toolbox was as indispensable then as a computer is now.  

 The Knickerbocker Bench is my effort to reconnect people with the simple beauty of a handmade object, one that they can sometimes participate in the making of a permanent installation at a park.  I make them for private sale, but I also make them with groups of people, using traditional tools like two-man saws, hand planes, and scraper blades alongside band saw and chain saw mills.  Log benches connect us to the earth in an unique way, and the Knickerbocker Bench is as much an invitation to slow down and appreciate the beauty that surrounds us as it is a functional and durable piece of furniture.  I make them because people respond to them, and I make them because they remind me of the curious and indispensable role that trees play as the lungs of the world.  There's lots of other reasons, but these are a few.

What I make

I make the Knickerbocker Bench.  I created it in 2007 as a gift to one of New York's many beautiful state parks to recognize the natural ice harvesting industry that once took place at the site.  The design is a 21st Century homage to mankind's first piece of furniture, the log bench.   I've made them in a variety of woods, most of them coming from reclaimed logs found in the woods or from tree services.  Since the first ones were made for the ruins of the ice houses, we've since made just under 100 more, most of them in parks or on trails in the Hudson Valley, but some also in the midwest.  As no two trees are alike, no two Knickerbocker Benches are the same, as well.  

 

 

Maker of the Day – Gerry Paquette (Day 29)

 

 

Gerry Paquette

Why I make

I teach board game design in a Game Development program at Algonquin college in Ottawa. The college Print Shop recently invested in 3D printers and I encourage my students to make use of it by creating custom bits for their games. As first-year students, most of them haven't had any training using 3D software. Tinkercad is the ideal entry-level tool that does not overwhelm it's users with options. In fact, limited options allows for a more creative approach to design. 

Once the students have sent me their models in .STL format, I'm able to preview them in Tinkercad and make modifications in terms of sizing and thickening elements that are likely to break before sending them on to be printed. 

What I make

I use Tinkercad to make custom board game components primarily. Recently I used it to create a flea circus as part of my costume for local Steampunk 5 year anniversary gala. 

My current project, Battle Cubed, is a tactical 3- dimensional space fighting game that features 3D printed ships and a 2D stand with platforms that are laser cut out of acrylic and assembled into a 3-tiered playing surface.

 

 

Maker of the Day – Emmanuel Di Giacomo (Day 28)

 

 

Emmanuel Di Giacomo

Why I make

I am an Architect by training and I have always been crazy of Utopy in Architecture. I was also a former alumni of Paul Maymont, a famous French Architect and Utopist of the 60ies.I designed and drew my first architectural creations when I was 15. The Story became even stronger when I used my first 3D Software in 1989 on a Mac. I then fell in love with Revit and decided to continue the Utopic Story by giving life to the Utopic City. 

What I make

I design and create a Revit Utopic City in 3D based on the map of famous cities like Roma and Milan. It's made of hundreds of crazy and nice buildings and infrastructures, a completely imaginary and complex world that more than 93,600 Facebook lovers follow in the world. It allows also to show the creative power of a BIM tool like Revit.

 

 

Maker of the Day – Scott Kildall (Day 27)

 

 

Scott Kildall

Why I make

Creative energy sustains me and by making physical things, I transform thoughts into form. I view new technologies as an opportunity to experiment with possibilities that is completely new, but pays homage to older traditions. 

The data crystals reflect this transformation from virtual into material using technology that wasn't available 10 years ago.

What I make

Data Crystals are a series of 3D-printed sculptures, which I generate algorithmically from various data sources. These manifest a vision of what data physically looks like — one possibility for 3D data visualization.

My source for the data crystals range from city-provided open datasets such as construction permit and crime statistics to biometric data generated by human bodies such as physical movement or EEG (brainwaves) data. 

I see data as sculptural material, like clay, plaster or steel. By using code to transform columns of numbers into 3D models, I call myself a “data miner,” where I extract data into small gems. I’m still experimenting with legibility and aesthetics. The primary question that drives this work is the question of “what does data look like?” 

 

 

Maker of the Day – Max Gunawan (Day 26)

 

 

Max Gunawan

Why I make

Inspired by the idea of an illuminated book, it is designed to have intuitive functionality. Simply open the cover to turn it on, the further you open the cover the brighter it gets. It packs eight hours of rechargeable battery life and can be easily recharged through a micro USB port. 

Lumio is the first product from a studio dedicated to helping people live large with less. The studio is focused on simple, multi-functional, everyday objects that are simple, intuitive and beautiful.
The Lumio brand creates modern lighting systems with the simple goal of giving people the freedom to experience beautiful lighting wherever they are.

What I make

Lumio is a modern portable lamp that unfolds from a book and can be transformed into multiple forms and functions. It has a minimalist design that combines laser-cut wood cover with durable water resistant Tyvek pages containing high performing LED. With a unique combination of transformable shape and concealed Neodymium magnets, you can personalize Lumio into endless configurations and mount it on almost any surface. Lumio provides you with an elegant lighting solution whether you're throwing an impromptu backyard party or reading a bedtime story to your kids. 

 

 Max is a TechShop user! Find out more about Lumio here.