Fab10 Barcelona

 

Autodesk was pleased to be a primary sponsor and an award giver for the inaugural Fab Awards, at the 10th annual Fab Lab Conference in Barcelona, Spain. According to their website, "FAB10Barcelona is a one week series of events focused on open and accessible technologies that will change the world. It gathers the Fab Lab Network and the citizens of Barcelona to make it a FAB City." 

Competition was fierce with over 100 excellent submissions from dozens of countries!  Most projects included their source files, so you can even make them yourself: https://www.fab10.org/en/awards

Below you can see all of the winners:

Sénamé Koffi and his team of architects & engineers from Lomé, Togo. After buying a 3D printer for their new makerspace WoeLab, they looked around and realized they already had the parts to build their next 3D printing machine.

Every year, 515 tons of broken gadgets get shipped to West Africa, where young workers burn the equipment to salvage materials like gold and copper in a dangerously toxic environment. But there’s a lot of craft and engineering that goes into electronic components, all of which is wasted when things gets melted down for scrap.  WoeLab manager Dodji Honou says the members of WoeLab asked themselves, “how can we create something of our own using what we have around us?”

Using the frame of an old desktop computer, iron rails from discarded printers, and one new Arduino board, WoeLab member Afate Gnikou invented the W.Afate 3D printer—which won First Place in the Fab Awards.

“With an old thing and a good idea,” says Honou, “you can make a solution.”

 

Second prize went to another new idea inspired by old electronics: the Ag Inkjet Circuit (AgIC) was developed by Yoshihiro Kawahara from the University of Tokyo, in collaboration with Microsoft Research Cambridge and Georgia Institute of Technology. "Ag" is the chemical symbol for silver, and this brilliant invention uses conductive silver ink to turn ordinary inkjet printers into circuit board manufacturers. To quote the AgIC website: “Say goodbye to breadboard.”

 

In third place we have the 3D Printed Prosthetics initiative at Fab Lab San Diego in California, USA, with Katie Rast presenting their innovative Gladius prosthetic leg design and their initiative to support 3D-printed hands.  Most prosthetic legs are specialized in their use so people require multiple prosthetics for different activities, but this new design provides an all-in-one solution for running or walking on different terrains.

3D printed prosthetics have an advantage over traditional designs because they are a fraction of the cost and they can easily be tailor-made. Initiatives like Fab Lab San Diego and eNABLE connect 3D printers to people who need prosthetic hands, while providing simple software for customizing hands to fit their users.

 

 

Autodesk had an award to present, and it went to the Waag Society’s inventive and customizable low-cost prosthesis. This prosthetic leg is a collaboration between Dutch and Indonesian designers, using locally-available materials like pineapple tree fibers and bamboo, a realistic alternative for people without access to MRI's and industrialized technology.

 

A popular vote awarded FabPonics from Puerto Rico the Audience Choice Prize. Their clever aquaponics design brings urban farming to the Caribbean, and uses digital fabrication to easily manufacture systems for incorporating fish tanks and water filtration into small farming modules.

Overall it was an amazing and inspiring event full of innovative people and brand new ideas. If you want to get involved in events like this, consider creating your own projects! You can even get started right here on 123D

Maker of the Day – Zachary Vorhies (Day 20)

Zachary Vorhies

Why I make

I love making wearable fashion! I've always had an interest in the clothes people would make for Burning Man, the most fantastic place on earth (for that week).

One year I met a fashion designer, Wheylan Dean-Ford, who makes costumes for rockstars and movies. He ended up crashing at my house after Burning Man and we got to talking about fashion. He was struggling with putting electronics into his outfits and since I love electronics, I was more than able to help him out. That got us to talking about my own outfit that I wanted to create. The idea that I had was to do a mashup of a glow stick and a CamelBak so we created this thing that called the Hydropak, which is like a CamelBak, but glows to the sound of music.

The Hydropak outfit was a really big hit with my friends and so I started wearing it all the time. One time I wore it to a fashion show and the organizer snapped a picture of me and said, "Who made this amazing outfit?" and I was like, "I did!" He responded, "Why don't you make five more like this and I'll put it on the fashion runway?" 

So I called my designer friend who was living in New York and said, "Hey, want to fly to San Francisco and help me make five outfits for this fashion show?" He was like, "Okay!" So we did it. 

The following week we started a massive one month work session creating five fashion pieces. One of these pieces was the Turn Signal Glove which you can see at: www.futuretechwear.com 

When we showed off the gloves, the response was overwhelming: "YOU MUST MAKE MORE OF THESE TURN SIGNAL GLOVES!" 

So from there on out I was on a mission to create the best cycling glove in the world. I said goodbye to my job at Google and said hello to the wonderful world of entrepreneurship, and the rest is history. 

What I make

Turn Signal Gloves - www.zackees.com
Kickstarter and made $72.5k in sales in just 30 days. CNET said that they were “...enough to encourage a new era of turn signal use.” 

Lightup Outfits - www.futuretechwear.com These are some outfits I created to showcase my talent. 

LED Piano - https://www.youtube.com/watch? v=5V2d0_P9cLo

I designed the electronics and built the software. The fabrication of the piano was carried out by the artist, William Jerome, who also uses it in his performances in his band, Interstellar Transmissions. 

Maker of the Day – David Lang (Day 10)

David Lang

Why I make

Well, it all started with Eric Stackpole and his wild imagination. He has a passion for telerobotics, and had wanted to explore an underwater cave in the Sierra Nevadas. It was that story that started the whole project. 

What I make

Our group, OpenROV, makes low-cost, open-source underwater robots. I also wrote a book called Zero to Maker.

You can buy David's book on Amazon - it's a great resource for anyone who doesn't think they have what it takes to be a maker. Whether you have some projects in mind or you just know that you want to make things, you will be inspired by David's book. You can also check out TechShop, where David is a member, and work on your projects there.

You can also learn more about the OpenROV project here, as well.