TAKE THE CREATIVE CHALLENGE!

 

Have your best 3D project printed!

Show us your coolest creation using Autodesk’s 123D tools in a 30 second or less video. Then, send your link to family and friends so they can choose their favorite! The most voted on project may get a $250 credit to Voodoo Manufacturing, where you can upload your 3D design to be printed!

In your video, be sure to include:

1. Your name and location.

2. What you created, and why.

3. What Autodesk 123D tools you used.

4. Keep the video under 30 seconds. We may showcase it online!

5. Share the link to your entry and make sure to tell those who vote for your video, they can vote once per day! (So come back tomorrow to vote again, and the next day, and the next...)

If you have another project you'd like to submit, please do! This challenge closes on March 8th, 2016 at 11:59pm PST. Show us what you've got, and have fun! Enter now!

 

123D Design 1.7 – A really solid release

We are really proud to announce the release of 123D Design 1.7 (Windows and Mac).

Definitely our best release ever, but you will think that everybody says that for a new release, a new record, etc.

Let me explain what makes this release our most epic one. Two key elements: Tinkercad and Solids!!!

For some time, we have received a lot of feedback about some interactions in Tinkercad that make a lot of sense, and we should adopt them in 123D Design. That’s exactly what we did with two very important ones: Align and Scale.

The new Align tool is very similar to Tinkercad’s Align tool. When multiple objects are selected, it displays some options for aligning to edges or center. You will get a preview before you need to click on your choice.

Changing sizes of selections has been another huge request. We now offer a tool called Smart Scale, which will show a bounding box around your selection, and allow you to change sizes by clicking on the values, or simply drag the controls, exactly like in Tinkercad. So you now have traditional Scale using scale factors, and Smart Scale when you want to force the object to a specific size.

Were you missing a local way to do vectors? We’ve added Export SVG, which saves an SVG file with whatever is intersecting the grid. This is done locally, so it doesn’t involve creating a 2D Layout in the cloud.

This may seem like a lot already. But there’s more.

Imagine you are working in Tinkercad, or got an STL file created by any mechanical app. There’s a limited amount of things you can do with it.

Except that now, if the mesh is healthy (no gaps), it can be converted into a solid, and optimized while doing the conversion. We will find any co-planar faces and this will be a single face you can push. Or find a cylindrical section (made of multiple little facets) and convert it into real arcs. You can now find that edge you wanted to smooth in Tinkercad and it was impossible (up to now).

In the example below, this fantastic model kitchen set may need some editing. So you can get the STL file of the part you want to modify, and convert into solid. Then you can proceed with your favorite solid editing tools!

In a nutshell, our best release ever. Any doubts?

Enjoy the brand new 123D Design!

Download 123D Design

Learning never stops with Project Ignite

Responding to the President’s call to action to create a Nation of Makers, and as part of a White House event kicking off the National Week of Making, we announced Project Ignite, an open learning platform that builds the skill and confidence of young learners through creative, hands-on design experiences focused on the latest technology trends like 3D printing and electronics. Targeting K-12 schools, Project Ignite encompasses the end-to-end design experience, from idea to digital modeling to physical fabrication.

  • For educators – Project Ignite brings together free* Autodesk design software, including Tinkercad and 123D Circuits, and offers step-by-step lessons within these apps to encourage design thinking and hands-on problem solving skills. It also provides for-purchase hardware options such as 3D printers from MakerBot and Circuit Scribe pens and modules from Electroninks Writeables. Educators can also login for free* to access Project Ignite content whether or not they wish to purchase hardware.
  • For schools – Administrators may choose from various package solutions comprised of free* software and for-purchase hardware options, educator training and support, all from a single place to introduce the Maker Movement into the classroom.
  • For educational partners – Project Ignite is open to educators, publishers, education technology and hardware providers looking for unique opportunities to help drive the next education revolution that will inspire students to further their STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math) education and provide educators access to emerging technology trends quickly.
  • For families or parents – Project Ignite is a great way to learn technology basics together in a moderated environment that extends to engaging and fun weekend projects.

To learn more about the Project Ignite sign up today and get started https://projectignite.autodesk.com. ProjectIgniteLogo

Meshmixer 2.9 Saves the Day!

Many of you have been writing us to say thank you for the unique ways that Meshmixer helps you with 3D printing your creations. Today, we say thank YOU by releasing Meshmixer 2.9! There are some spectacular new features in this release...

For those who work with full color models, such as those coming from depth cameras, 123D Catch or 123D Sculpt+, Meshmixer now supports maintaining the color with most tools in Meshmixer. For the geeks: UV textures are supported while editing. Now you can sculpt, remesh, boolean, erase and fill, reduce, etc all while maintaining the integrity of the color on your model.

For example, see the illustration below showing the upgraded Reduce tool that maintains the color texture of a 123D Catch capture while reducing the size and complexity of the geometry.

What is truly a game changer for this release is the addition of precise transforms and the new Pivot tool. The Transform tool now has a properties panel for precise input of position, rotation, and sizing. Now you can enter the exact location and orientation you want your objects to be.

For example, I can perfectly size and align these two objects to each other for an interesting boolean difference result.

 Also, using the new Pivot objects, I can place pivots in many different ways (optionally linking them to objects) and use them in many of the existing tools. For example I can drag one pivot to another and snap the attached object accurately for a quick alignment. 

 

Here is a list of what is new in this release:

  • Updated most Tools to properly handle Texture Maps
  • New Pivots objects for simplifying precise positioning
  • New Create Pivot tool to place Pivots in many different ways
  • Existing Tools now snap to Pivots when possible
  • Updated Transform tool with precise input of translate/rotate/sizing
  • Transform tool can use a Pivot as arbitrary center-of-rotation
  • Rewritten Align tool with many new alignment modes
  • Fast Pivot-to-Pivot interaction to rapidly position objects
  • Rewritten Remesh tool with new remeshing modes
  • New Adaptivity setting in brush tools
  • Improved support for multi-user installations
  • Improved stability, particularly startup crashes, network-related crashes, and GPU issues
  • Support for Anti-Aliased Rendering in Preferences (disabled by default)

 

Finally, everyone should check out this 3D printed short film. Filmmaker Gilles-Alexandre Deschaud wrote to thank us for Meshmixer and told us how it streamlined 3D printing everything seen in the film. More on this story soon...

Introducing Tinkerplay: anyone can make 3D printed creatures and characters

We're pleased to announce a new addition to Autodesk's family of easy-to-use apps for all: Tinkerplay. I've been using this app for a while, and I'm very excited to share all the features and enhancements the team has been working on.

Tinkerplay is an app for iOS, Android and Windows that lets you design great-looking creatures and characters, and then 3D print them. It's incredibly fun to use, you can choose from a wide range of parts that just snap together, and then customize them with colors and textures.

Start with professionally created templates, or make your own creations. We'll be rolling many more exciting templates going forward, as well as new parts to make your creations more varied. Keep reading after the break to see more things you can do with Tinkerplay!

Read more »

From the Makers: Tinkercad to 3D print!

Lining up at the gate for Maker Faire Rome 2014At the last couple of Maker Faire events, lots of people told us how they used Tinkercad for all their 3D printing. We're so honored to have such loyal users!   I thought I'd reflect here on some of the most popular features, in case some of you weren't aware.  Anything I missed? Screen Shot 2014-10-04 at 7.05.01 AM- Water-Tight STL files
Tinkercad is great as a last point of prep before sending a model to the printer.  The Import function can make the most stubborn files magically heal themselves, allowing you to re-export or add a solid base for stability.

 

Screen Shot 2014-10-04 at 6.52.07 AM - Direct to 3D print service capability.
A couple of clicks is all that stands between you and a full color print of your model (or Peter D. Penguin).  Just go to Design > Order a 3D Print.  

 

SVG Import
You can import a line drawing in an SVG file format to extrude right in Tinkercad (or even 123D Design).  

 

- Slicing a Larger Print for Sectional Printing.
We covered this in a recent TinkerTip, but using 2 boxes as holes allows you to keep a clean seam when breaking up a larger model into multiple prints.  

Autodesk / Tinkercad win big at 3D Print Show Awards!

Thanks so much for everyone that voted in this year's 3D Print Show Awards!

We're so honored to have won Brand of the Year (Autodesk) and Best Online/App-Based Service (Tinkercad) and proud to have such a great community of designers, modelers and Tinkerers!

Congrats also to all the other winners - well deserved!

 

Join The Open Source Dress – Using Tinkercad

For anyone who follows Anouk Wipprecht or is just hearing about her infamous, interactive 3D printed dresses - This is a chance to add YOUR design sensibility to one of her couture-creations...  Anouk x Polaire will be assembling 3D printed "Particles" made by people all over the world - into a complete "Open Source Dress".  There is still time to send your particle.

On the left: some of the smaller prototype dress.  On the right: a particle sent in by a contributor.  


Anouk added LED rings to some of her own particles, using them as examples.

Here's more... check out what people are making on Tinkercad by filtering for #ParticleDress:

To participate is quite simple if you or a friend have a 3D printer.  The easiest way is to simply 3D print this existing part in Tinkercad or if you're the creative type : change that 3D model in Tinkercad so it has your own personal style - then send the print to:

THE OPEN SOURCE ELEMENT DRESS 
Anouk Wipprecht x Polaire 
Schottenfeldgasse 72/8c 
1070 Wien, Austria

*** For all the details --- Check out Anouk's Instructable ***


We took a little time out of our day and designed / 3D printed a couple particles.  Have a look:

Below left is our version of their base model, it will easily print on a Makerbot or similar 3D printer (click to Tinker-it). Below middle is the "spikey" particle you see above, and below right is the "balloon" particle" you see above in white.


You can start with the base model (might require support material) or our blue/orange version of the base model (you can change the colors) that will require no support material.

If you don't have a 3D printer you're not out of luck.  There are several professional companies eager to perfectly-print your models and we've got them lined up on our 3D-Print page.  

Hope to see your particles on the Open Source Dress!
-123D

123D Users Kristina and Sebastian’s Felt Vase

123D Make users Kristina Larsen and Sebastian Martin are the 123D Featured Users for the week... they're also part of the Instructables Artists in Residence program AND they've worked at San Francisco's world-renowned science museum, The Exploratorium.  Talk about impressive resumes, these two are destined for greatness.  

The project of theirs that caught our attention is this beautiful, soft and fuzzy (yet surprisingly sturdy) vase.

felt vase

What's really great about this project is that it can be replicated by anyone.  Autodesk provides free software to make it all possible, you just need a little patience while you cut the felt.

Kristina and Sebastian used Autodesk's Fusion 360 to design the vase's 3D model.  While Fusion 360 is an extremely powerful 3D modeling tool we thought this was a perfect opportunity to reproduce a very similar 3D model in Tinkercad, and here's what we got in 5 just minutes: link to model.

The left side shows the egg and two shapes we used as "holes" to flatten the bottom and carve out the hole for the glass vase in the top.  The right side shows we then selected "download for 3D printing" to get the model to open in 123D Make...

vase in tinkercad

And here's a screenshot showing 123D Make slicing the vase.

There's a lot more information in two Instructables written about this project, we link to them at the bottom of this page.  We also asked the pair a couple questions about why this project and why 123D Make...

123D: Why this project?
K&S: Part of what we’re doing in our Instructables residency is experimenting with different techniques, with the intention of incorporating those discoveries into our fabrication repertoire. We like to let the inherent properties or characteristics of materials inform our work so will push on things to see what they do when treated in different ways. Early on we hit on the idea of using the waterjet to cut very thick, dense wool felt which is normally used for industrial applications.

Felt is such an amazing material, and has physical properties unlike anything else, but when you cut wool felt with a laser it smells really terrible, like burned hair, and then the smell is really hard to remove. Plus you really can’t cut dense ½” thick felt with a laser. Waterjet cutting seemed a viable alternative, potentially clearing a path to digital fabrication using big sheets of this material. The result is even better than we imagined -- the cut edge is nice and crisp, and there’s a really satisfying tension between the machined quality of those edges and the overall softness of the material.  People can’t tell what the vase is made of when they first see it, and are nicely surprised once they figure it out.

We used the simple vase shape for our first experiment to give the project some clear constraints, since there was a lot about the process that was unknown to us. Now that we’ve seen how it works and how the material behaves we can confidently incorporate the technique into the creation of more complex sculptural objects. This way the risk and experimentation lies more in anticipating the aesthetic impact of the final piece, and less in unexpected variables in construction. We’re working on a piece inspired by topography and geology, where the layered construction will reference subsurface geologic structures, and the felt will take on the kind of soft, sculpted forms you'd expect from wool, in addition to showing the machined edge featured in the vase.

123D: What brought you to use 123D Make?
K&S: When we started this project I figured we’d have to draw the individual slices after building a form in (Autodesk) Fusion 360 software, but then discovered the slice-generating feature in 123D Make. 123D Make’s ability to quickly generate slices of any form, for any thickness of material, is such an exciting and powerful feature. 123D Make draws the slices in real time so you can play with different angles, and it simultaneously shows you how much material you’ll need to complete the project. In combination with laser, waterjet, or other computer-controlled cutting technologies it opens up whole realms of possibility for generating three-dimensional structures. Really, the only limitation is that you have to use a material that comes in a sheet.

Awesome!  To find out more about Kristaina Larsen and Sebastian Martin - check out these links: the Project387 Blog, their web site Cloudear.com, and their two instructables on this project: Layered Felt Vase, and Cutting Felt with Water.

Would you like to be a featured user?  Apply here.  Thanks Kristina and Sebastian!

 

 

 

 

The Mighty Midwest Presents: The Chicago Public Library

 

This week in the Mighty Midwest we take a look at how 3D printing is changing the way visitors experience their local public library. Libraries have always existed as repositories of learning and information, and as technologies change there is a huge opportunity for them to adapt and bring those technologies to the masses. The Chicago Public Library has set up a Maker Lab in their downtown branch to bring new technologies to the people of Chicago. In the video below you can see how this Maker Lab is transforming the library experience by bringing things like 3D modeling and 3D printing, laser cutting, and more to the average person.