How to easily generate 3D Printable enclosures for your electronics projects in 123D Circuits

We've been blogging a lot recently about 123D Circuits projects and users but it's time we talked about the "3D" in the name.

While circuits are typically designed in a 2D UI the 123D Circuits app will generate a perfect-fitting 3D enclosure for your Circuit.  Check out this 3D printed example of an enclosure generated by 123D Circuits: The Theremin.Theremin with Enclosure

Keep reading to check out how easy 3D modeling an enclosure can be with 123D Circuits.

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The Mighty Midwest presents: Tom Burtonwood

 

On this week's installment of the Mighty Midwest we have fan favorite, Tom Burtonwood. Tom is making great strides in showcasing Chicago as an epicenter of art and innovation. Tom, a Tinkercad and 123D Catch user, is an artist residing in Chicago, and he uses 3D scanning, 3D modeling, and 3D printing to transform the way we understand objects. Tom shares his knowledge of 3D printing in a number of capacities, including giving classes at the Art Institute of Chicago, teaching students at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and helping people new to the 3D printing at the Firecat Projects gallery. Tom also joined us in San Mateo for the Bay Area Maker Faire this last May. If you saw our video from last week then you got a little sneak peek of Tom's work.

Earlier this year we had the chance to visit him all over Chicago to see how Tom helps diverse groups of people understand this new 3D printing technology that's sweeping the nation.

 

Be sure to keep up with Tom's latest projects on his website and on his Thingiverse account. 

Multitouch Tinkercad and 123D Circuits for Windows

Have you heard the news?  The first releases of Tinkercad and 123D Circuits with multitouch just hit the Windows App Store!  Like their browser-based counterparts they're totally free and they'll run on any Windows 8.1 computer.

Let's dig into it!  Tinkercad for Windows 8.1 with multitouch now lets you Pan, Zoom, and Orbit with two fingers, which is as intuitive as it gets.  You can also drag, position and manipulate shapes just as you normally would with a mouse - now with a stylus too.

Check out this awesome hands-on video with Tinkercad:

Tinkercad with Multitouch

With 123D Circuits for Windows 8.1 you can now pan and zoom with your fingers and design and edit circuits with the stylus.  It's a great way to design using two hands and if you don't have a Windows 8.1 PC with a touchscreen or touchpad you can still download the apps and run them with a mouse as you would their browser counterparts.

Check out this video of 123D Circuits multitouch:

123D Circuits with Multitouch 

These are first-releases so if you have a Windows 8.1 PC and you use Tinkercad or 123D Circuits, we'd love to hear your feedback in the comments section below.

PINHOL3D: 3D printing through a new lens

 

The inspiration for my first project stems from a deep-rooted love for iPhone photography. While a number of phone apps exist for the sole purpose of photo manipulation, there are comparatively few hardware accessories that serve the same purpose. Recalling my days of haphazardly taping a pinholed-cardboard square to my iPhone camera, I envisioned my first 3D printing project achieving that same grainy, vignetting effect in hardware form. Enter my first project: the iPhone pinhole camera.

freshly-printed iPhone pinholes

My first attempt at the iPhone pinhole was only minorly successful. I modeled the device on Tinkercad, essentially slicing off two-thirds of an already-created iPhone 5 case, and adding a cylinder with a small opening over the camera area to create the pinhole. This took all of twenty minutes; it’s that easy.

I then printed it on one of the many Objet500 printers here at Pier 9, using the Tango Black material. While the produced model was workable, the material was too flimsy to comfortably sit on the iPhone. Moreover, the pinhole was slightly too far to the left and needed to be manually adjusted for each picture.

Thus, I returned to the drawing board (that is, Tinkercad). This time, I used iPhone specs detailed in Apple’s developer guide to locate the center of the camera. Using Tinkercad’s ruler feature, I easily plugged in the specified measurements and there it was — a complete second iteration in less than half an hour. Total insanity.

Honestly, the longest part of this process was waiting for a fellow Pier 9 shop user’s piece to finish printing so I could load my creation onto the Objet500. But after a mere hour of watching the printer lay down layer upon layer of model material, there it was — the material version of an idea that I’d conceived of 24 hours before this moment.

Excavating the model from its support materialHot off the object

Despite my immediate urge to test it out, I needed to dislodge the piece from its support material encasing — a process that I greatly underestimated. After half an hour of chiseling away at the support material with a power washer and a variety of ice-pick-resembling hand tools, there was my glistening iPhone pinhole camera.

So here — directly from my new pinhole camera to your screen — is the world of an Autodesk intern through a Tinkercad-created lens:

I also modeled a number of iterations, experimenting with the depth of the pinhole casing as well as the number and orientation of pinholes. Follow my instructable, print your own, and play around with your pinhole images on Pixlr for extra vintage-looking, instagram-able results.

 

Ole Ole Ole with 123D Circuits!

Good luck to the 32 qualifying teams in Tinkercup 2014!  To celebrate them, we recorded an old standard that seems to get popular every few years! Check out this iconic song as played on a 123D Circuits project!

 Want more info on the 123D Circuits project?  Check out this blog.

Tinkercup 2014!

Brazil v Croatia

Game 1 - Brazil and Croatia on June 12!

In light of the coming festivities in Brazil this year, we've hijacked Tinkercad's Wordless Wednesday for the next few weeks to bring you the first ever, online-3D-modeling-penguin-soccer tournament - the TinkerCup!!  We've modeled 32 of the Tinkercad penguins to represent the qualifying FIFA World Cup teams. Use these models or create your own to show your support for your favorite team.  The best part is, you could win some Tinkercad gear!

Group G of the 2014 FIFA World Cup

Make a model featuring your dream team or even a dream match-up with the country you think will go all the way to the finals from now until June 25 and tag the model with #Tinkercup2014.  We've got buttons, bags and T-shirts for the teams that progress past the Round of 16 in the run to the Cup!  If your team is one of the eight that makes it to the quarter finals, you'll rack up Tinkercad swag until they get knocked out!  But you better hurry, because our gear supply is limited, and only the top 10 models for each team will be considered, based on likes from the Tinkercad Community as of June 25.

For example - say we used the model of the French team penguin eating a baguette on the Eiffel Tower by June 25 and tag it #TinkerCup2014. If the French get knocked out of the tournament during or before the Second Stage, c'est la vie...  But, if they make it past the Round of 16 to the quarter finals, then game on.  Also, the single most-liked model of the winning team will be put on a t-shirt for it's creator!   

Visit the FIFA site for more info on the matches.

If your team makes it to/or gets knocked of:
The Round of 16: The country will mourn!
The Quarter Finals (July 4-5): You get a Tinkercad Button and Stickers!
The Semi-Finals (July 8-9): Button, Stickers and a Tinkercad Backpack!
The Finals (Sunday July 13): Button, Stickers and a new Tinkercad Shirt!
The winning team: All of it! A Button, Stickers, Backpack, and Tinkercad Shirt!

PLUS: The winning country model that gets the most likes in the Tinkercad Gallery will be featured on the Tinkercad Homepage AND get a shirt with an image of their model on it!

peterdpenguin

Not the actual shirt, but what will the winning team be??

Keep it clean, and avoid penalties. Remember:

- Make the model Public by June 25 (we can tell when it was created) and tag it #TinkerCup2014.
- Because only the top 10 models for each country will be considered, be sure to make it early and rack up the Likes.
- We're all about worldliness, but please, don't submit models for more than 2 countries. Referee Peter D. Penguin prefers true fans.
- Be sure it's clear in the title who's your favorite, especially if you use 2 or more countries in a single model.
- Only one set of Tinkercad gear per person, so even if you make models for 2 teams and they both make it to the final match, you'll only get one button/bag/shirt.
- Duplicate and Tinker all you want, but without substantial changes, only the original model will be considered for the tournament. Questionable models will ultimately be judged by the Tinkercad Team and red-carded as deemed appropriate.
- Any questions? Email us at team@tinkercad.com. At the very least, check out
Peter's friends from around the world!

Maker of the Day – Gerry Paquette (Day 29)

 

 

Gerry Paquette

Why I make

I teach board game design in a Game Development program at Algonquin college in Ottawa. The college Print Shop recently invested in 3D printers and I encourage my students to make use of it by creating custom bits for their games. As first-year students, most of them haven't had any training using 3D software. Tinkercad is the ideal entry-level tool that does not overwhelm it's users with options. In fact, limited options allows for a more creative approach to design. 

Once the students have sent me their models in .STL format, I'm able to preview them in Tinkercad and make modifications in terms of sizing and thickening elements that are likely to break before sending them on to be printed. 

What I make

I use Tinkercad to make custom board game components primarily. Recently I used it to create a flea circus as part of my costume for local Steampunk 5 year anniversary gala. 

My current project, Battle Cubed, is a tactical 3- dimensional space fighting game that features 3D printed ships and a 2D stand with platforms that are laser cut out of acrylic and assembled into a 3-tiered playing surface.

 

 

Beyond the blocks: modeling a space plane for 3D printing in Tinkercad

When people think about modeling rockets and space ships in Tinkercad, they can be forgiven for thinking that all you can do is stick a cone shape on top of a cylinder, and call it a day - but they're wrong! Tinkercad can do a lot more.

Tinkercad has a very powerful engine under the hood, and with some creativity and ingenuity, you can make great looking models that rival those from other 3D modeling packages - and do it fast, for free and in your browser.

Keep reading and follow along the Instructable if you want to learn more.

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Glow-in-the-Dark Rocket Mobile with 123D and Tinkercad

We've been thinking about rockets and spaceships this week at 123D and we had some cool glow-in-the-dark filament for a Makerbot Rep2, so naturally: GLOW IN THE DARK SPACESHIPS!

The models came directly from the 123Dapp.com gallery, and the planets, end caps and filament points I quickly modeled in Tinkercad. Because the rockets were taller than would fit on a Makerbot, I imported them into MeshMixer to chop them in half witht the Slice tool. Slicing them also allowed for printing without support material.  With a little Krazy Glue, you get more size options.

If you want to make this yourself, you can try downloading more and different rockets. We've collected together a bunch of really varied rocket designs. ( <- click to see the collection and download!)

The trickiest part of a mobile is (perhaps obvious) is the balancing of all the elements - both physically and visually.  I printed a couple different sizes of rockets and planets, with varying infills so that I would have options when I started assembling it.  Only after printing the last rocket did I realize I could have just modeled the eyelets, but there you have it.

In total, the project cost about $15 in parts and materials: monofilament, eyelets, dowels and krazy glue. 

 

This is a perfect weekend project - and the glow-in-the-dark filament is available from Makerbot.  See the whole project here on 123dapp.com.  What are you making for SPAC3D?

Rockets and Robots: exploring STEM education with 123D

April is a big month for rockets and robots, and for STEM education in general. Here at the Autodesk 123D world headquarters, we are pleased to provide you with tools and project ideas that will help you explore this field.

Coming up first is Yuri's Night, a celebration of the first manned flight into space, on April 12th. We have an extensive collection of 3D rocket models in the 123D Gallery, and we've gathered them together for your convenience. Check out some of them below. You can download them, change them, 3D print them and share them with your friends. Stay tuned for tutorials on how you can use 123D Design, Tinkercad and Meshmixer to make some great things.

Soon after that, two major competitive robotics events are coming up, both from April 23-26: The VEX Robotics World Championship in Anaheim, California; and the FIRST Robotics Competition in St. Louis Missouri. We'll be publishing simple robotics projects to get you started in this field, integrating electronics and 3D printing.

You can also find some great 3D models of robots in the 123D Gallery - we've packaged up some of them, but feel free to go exploring: there are a lot more! Use them as a starting point for some fun projects.

Keep checking back, for fun and easy projects you can do, and a surprise guest!