123D Design, 123D Catch & 123D Make Web Apps Closing


Update: 123D Circuits and Tinkercad are not using the unsupported plugins so they will continue to thrive! The only apps that are affected are the three mentioned below.

If you have been using the web based versions of the 123D apps that run in your browser, you probably noticed that they have gone bonkers recently.

We're well aware and have been anticipating the need to shut them down as the plugins that allows them to run within the most common web browsers are no longer supported. So, today, we are sad to see our trusty web based apps go, they were a trusty platoon while they were here!

So, what to do?! 

The apps continue on with their mobile and desktop comrades, and we have some exciting ideas we're working on for the new year and we'll continue bring you these apps for your creative making needs. Here is where you can find them:

123D Catch: Our popular "photos to 3D model" app is available for your iOS or Android device for your capturing on the go. There is also a Windows desktop version.

123D Design: Quickly whip up 3D printable prototypes with the Mac and Windows desktop versions. Also, available for your iPad!

123D Make: We just released a brand new version of the desktop app (v1.6) and it is available for Mac and Windows. 123D Make will nest your slices for printing/cutting, which optimizes material usage without manual post processing.  You may also send a cutting job directly to your system printer/lasercutter. Try it!  Lastly, we built a "teaser" app for iOS which gives you a preview of what 123D Make can do!

So, we salute the web based apps and say goodbye for now. We hope to meet again in your "easy-to-get-to-web-based-form". Check back often here for updates to these and other apps we are working on to help you be creative!

 - 123D Team, Autodesk Consumer Group

123D Make (Love)

We've seen some really great usage of 123D Make this week! While most folks are constrained to a relatively small scale, with desktop CNC or lasers at a local TechShop, we found some artists and designers who are pushing their creations to human scale (and beyond).

                              

First, we got an email from down under: Georgia Morgan in Broome, Australia, has made a full-scale figure from 3mm steel using 123D Make.  It's a pretty elegant use of the radial slicing feature, and we're so honored to have been a part of it!

 

Over in Europe, Lana Awad teamed up with Fab Textiles and FabLab Barcelona to create "Rig", a life-size mannequin that was showcased at Fab10 in July.  


From Fab Textiles: "The design for RIG is an exploration into the creative potential of mannequins as tools for exhibiting and work with. RIG is a manifestation on how tools should be rethought, redesigned, and reimagined..."  We couldn't agree more, and we love seeing such an ambitious use of the 123D tools.


Perhaps the most impressive, in terms of scale... while installing our Autodesk Gallery Pop-Up in Paris, the team stopped by the Paris Auto Show and saw a giant elephant cut from cardboard!  

I know there are others out there joining their massive radial slices together!  What did we miss?

 

123D Users Kristina and Sebastian’s Felt Vase

123D Make users Kristina Larsen and Sebastian Martin are the 123D Featured Users for the week... they're also part of the Instructables Artists in Residence program AND they've worked at San Francisco's world-renowned science museum, The Exploratorium.  Talk about impressive resumes, these two are destined for greatness.  

The project of theirs that caught our attention is this beautiful, soft and fuzzy (yet surprisingly sturdy) vase.

felt vase

What's really great about this project is that it can be replicated by anyone.  Autodesk provides free software to make it all possible, you just need a little patience while you cut the felt.

Kristina and Sebastian used Autodesk's Fusion 360 to design the vase's 3D model.  While Fusion 360 is an extremely powerful 3D modeling tool we thought this was a perfect opportunity to reproduce a very similar 3D model in Tinkercad, and here's what we got in 5 just minutes: link to model.

The left side shows the egg and two shapes we used as "holes" to flatten the bottom and carve out the hole for the glass vase in the top.  The right side shows we then selected "download for 3D printing" to get the model to open in 123D Make...

vase in tinkercad

And here's a screenshot showing 123D Make slicing the vase.

There's a lot more information in two Instructables written about this project, we link to them at the bottom of this page.  We also asked the pair a couple questions about why this project and why 123D Make...

123D: Why this project?
K&S: Part of what we’re doing in our Instructables residency is experimenting with different techniques, with the intention of incorporating those discoveries into our fabrication repertoire. We like to let the inherent properties or characteristics of materials inform our work so will push on things to see what they do when treated in different ways. Early on we hit on the idea of using the waterjet to cut very thick, dense wool felt which is normally used for industrial applications.

Felt is such an amazing material, and has physical properties unlike anything else, but when you cut wool felt with a laser it smells really terrible, like burned hair, and then the smell is really hard to remove. Plus you really can’t cut dense ½” thick felt with a laser. Waterjet cutting seemed a viable alternative, potentially clearing a path to digital fabrication using big sheets of this material. The result is even better than we imagined -- the cut edge is nice and crisp, and there’s a really satisfying tension between the machined quality of those edges and the overall softness of the material.  People can’t tell what the vase is made of when they first see it, and are nicely surprised once they figure it out.

We used the simple vase shape for our first experiment to give the project some clear constraints, since there was a lot about the process that was unknown to us. Now that we’ve seen how it works and how the material behaves we can confidently incorporate the technique into the creation of more complex sculptural objects. This way the risk and experimentation lies more in anticipating the aesthetic impact of the final piece, and less in unexpected variables in construction. We’re working on a piece inspired by topography and geology, where the layered construction will reference subsurface geologic structures, and the felt will take on the kind of soft, sculpted forms you'd expect from wool, in addition to showing the machined edge featured in the vase.

123D: What brought you to use 123D Make?
K&S: When we started this project I figured we’d have to draw the individual slices after building a form in (Autodesk) Fusion 360 software, but then discovered the slice-generating feature in 123D Make. 123D Make’s ability to quickly generate slices of any form, for any thickness of material, is such an exciting and powerful feature. 123D Make draws the slices in real time so you can play with different angles, and it simultaneously shows you how much material you’ll need to complete the project. In combination with laser, waterjet, or other computer-controlled cutting technologies it opens up whole realms of possibility for generating three-dimensional structures. Really, the only limitation is that you have to use a material that comes in a sheet.

Awesome!  To find out more about Kristaina Larsen and Sebastian Martin - check out these links: the Project387 Blog, their web site Cloudear.com, and their two instructables on this project: Layered Felt Vase, and Cutting Felt with Water.

Would you like to be a featured user?  Apply here.  Thanks Kristina and Sebastian!

 

 

 

 

Sean Cusack’s Fire-Roasted Heart

123D user and master fabricator Sean Cusack may have a heart of gold, but in this instance he's here to melt hearts... Hearts made of half-inch (~12 mm) steel.  So don't get to close, this one's going to be hot!


What you're looking at is a welded steel heart, suspended by chains over a 12 million BTU, propane burning hot air balloon burner.  I bet you can guess what that does : turn steel red hot!

Sean says if the burner was left on long enough the steel would completely melt.  Sounds pretty cool, but we're also interested in how it was made.  Sean started with a simple 3D model of a heart (like this example, free on the 123D gallery), sliced it in half with MeshMixer, and used 123D Make to turn the remaining half-heart into slices that fit together nicely before welding.


Below is the half-heart before and after in 123D Make.  What looks like a complex 3D structure of interwoven slices was generated by 123D Make with just a few clicks.  You can download Sean's 3D Models and the sliced 123D Make from the 123D Project Gallery here's the link!

Hit the Read More link to see the process... Read more »

123D Design Desktop 1.5: Bringing the Family Together

The latest release of 123D Design for Windows and Mac doesn’t just have some cool new features - it actually helps to bring the whole 123D ecosystem together as a suite of tools for design and fabrication.

So what’s new? Some hints were already on the last version of 123D Design: we introduced the ability to open, insert and do some editing to meshes. You could open projects generated in 123D Catch right from MyProjects inside 123D Design, and also send to 3D print via Meshmixer using a one-click workflow.

Let me now explain what’s new with 1.5 and why it’s really great news for all of you.

First of all, whenever you import a mesh from 123D Catch, it most likely needs healing. In release 1.4, if you wanted to combine or subtract another mesh or solid, the meshes had to be watertight (meaning that there could be no gaps). Another issue had to do with the density of the meshes, which could make the operation slow or make it fail. So if you have a mesh that needs some help, you had to open Meshmixer, import the mesh again, do the necessary fixes and then import back into Design.

With the 1.5 release, we reduced a couple steps. By selecting any object in 123D Design, you will see an option to send to Meshmixer. This will automatically open Meshmixer with only that selection open, ready to edit. Then you can clean, remesh, reduce, sculpt, mash up, create patterns, or whatever else you wanted to do. Afterwards, simply export back into Design and you will then be able to reinsert the piece in the same location!

Another interesting use case is if you want to fabricate your design using 123D Make. You now have two options for this. You can send the entire model from the AppMenu > Send to > 123D Make. This will open 123D Make desktop with the file already imported. But now you can just send a selection by using the context menu. So if you have some extra pieces in the model that you don’t want to delete before exporting, or if you want to use different fabrication options inside 123D Make for different parts of your model (like interlocked slices for some parts but stacked slices for other parts).

The same criteria can be used for 3D printing. You can either prepare the entire file (from AppMenu > 3D Print or Ctrl+P) or just a selection (from the contextual menu) and send it to MeshMixer, which will directly open the 3D print utility. You can then analyze the part, create support for the overhangs, and print right to your desktop printer or order the part from different services (Sculpteo, iMaterialise, Shapeways).

This connection between the apps makes it quite easy to move across different processes. You can think of 123D Design as a path to both additive and subtractive manufacturing solutions (Meshmixer and 123D Make respectively).

Since we can now move selections across different applications, it really made sense to be able to also export a selection as a 123dx file or an STL file. This is also a quite useful new feature in 123D Design desktop.

But that's not all! For a while now, users have been asking for a better solution to create text. We've been working on it and we are now proud to present the new Text feature! First of all, it works offline, like the rest of the app. Secondly, it uses your system fonts! Last but not least, you can also throw the text into a sketch, so you will be able to perform different, independent operations with each closed profile. Not bad, right?

Just one more thing. Although you can use Meshmixer to process models for 3D printing - both at home and with 3rd party printers - you can also order a 3D print directly from 123D Design, provided it’s already saved in MyProjects. We've also added a new service provider - 3D Hubs!

3D Hubs provides the ability to connect with 3D printer owners near where you live or work. So if you want a fast delivery (or maybe even see your printer in person), you can print through 3D Hubs directly through 123D Design.

So check out 123D Design Desktop 1.5 and make sure you also have 123D Make and Meshmixer for a more complete experience! Also, keep sending feedback - most changes are directly from you guys, our rad users!

123D Make 3D DIY Projects. Made With Cricut.

photo of paper projects next to a Cricut Explore machine

Looking for a fun DIY project, but not prolific with scissors or don’t own a laser cutter? We’re happy to announce that Autodesk 123D has partnered with Cricut to bring a series of easy-to-assemble 3D DIY projects to Makers and Crafters. From rocket ships to dinosaurs to smartphone stands, these projects will delight and entertain boys and girls of all ages whether you’re 5 or 50!
 

All you need to get started is an affordable Cricut Explore™ electronic cutting machine, the free online Cricut Design Space™ software, and off-the-shelf poster board. Cardboard brown is no longer your only color option!


The first 8 projects are pictured below, clicking on them will take you to their respective project pages.  If you already own a Cricut Explore, load up the poster board and start cutting! The smartphone stand will make a great Fathers' Day present!

And make sure to keep checking back on Autodesk 123D's Blog and Cricut Partner Page, as well as Cricut's Autodesk Projects Page for even more projects!


What's the origin story of these beautiful projects, you ask? These first-of-its-kind 3D Cricut projects started off as 3D models from the 123Dapp.com gallery. The models were then infused with the unique slicing technology of 123D Make and transformed into easy-to-assemble cut patterns!

 

p/s. Full instructions coming soon to an Instructable near you! 

HIGHFIV3D: Autonomous Reassurance Device – Part 1

During the month of March, there are a few different music-themed things happening: SXSW and more festivals you can shake a stick at (it's even Music in our Schools Month!), so we're thinking about sound and music here at 123D. There are tons of great related models in the 123D gallery that we'll be remixing and playing with for the next few weeks, and a couple of us will be focusing on sound-related projects using 123D Circuits - look for #LISTEN3D 

As an at-best-novice with electronics, I decided to step lightly and integrate Circuits with some other projects I've been wanting to try. The first is, naturally, a High-Five machine.  While it has nothing to do with music, per se, I think I'll learn a lot about the audio/electronics side and 123D Circuits.

The idea is this: a free-standing hand that you can interact with for a bit of reassurance when walking to get a cup of coffee.  When you give it a healthy palm smack, it will generate some positive words of encouragement - think "You're Awesome!" or "Oh Yeah!".  Within a cardboard-stacked hand, a sensor would register impact and trigger the audio. My first thought was a Piezo sensor in the hand, but after some words of wisdom (and a high-five) I decided to go with an accelerometer that would determine when the hand was moved, thus activating the audio output.

The Mona Lisa started out on notebook paper, btw.

The first step is building the physical hand and then we'll figure out how the passerby will interact with it - table mounted seems the easiest, but wall-mounted would be a little cooler.  I considered using 123D Catch to create a model of my own hand and arm, but while messing around on 123D Creature, I found a really great model by Mark Dollar!  It's a bit cartoonish and big, so it should be perfect.

 

 

I downloaded the model and opened it in MeshMixer to open up the fingers a bit more for a proper high-five.  Then took it into Tinkercad to work on the cut out.  I think a 1" dowel is a fine way to make the 'arm'.  I also made a little hollow for the accelerometer.  

 

Once I was happy with the cutout, it was on to 123D Make to generate the slices for the laser cutter.  I wanted to keep it close to human scale, so I made it about 9" tall.  Once cut, the only tedious bit was the fingers (hopefully they'll withstand some trauma).  

 

 

Now I need to go shopping, look for next steps and more Sound & Music posts soon.

 

 

123D Make, Self Portrait as Kali

Self Portrait as Kali p1 

Anna Kaziunas France's sculpture "Self Portrait as Kali" was created from several photographs using the program ReconstructMe. She created two 3d models that were then merged with MeshMixer to create two sets of arms on a single torso. Both sets of arms are broken off at the forearms, as if the original scan were of an ancient statue that had been damaged over time. The final 3D model was sliced into 125 individual flat pieces using 123D Make, then routed on a ShopBot PRS Standard out of 1/2" MDF. The slices were then assembled and painted by hand.

The skull beads that make up the necklace and the belt were created from a 123D Catch scan of a single prop skull. OpenSCAD was used to import and manipulate the the skull scan into single and multi-face skull beads. The beads were smoothed with MeshMixer and printed on a first generation MakerBot Replicator. The beads were individually painted and strung as a belt and necklace, then used to adorn the assembled body.

123D Make cut outs of sculpture

This work has been displayed at the 3D Printed sculpture show "Bits to Its" at the Landing Gallery, in Rockport, ME and debuted in "Saturnalia" at the Candita Clayton Gallery in Pawtucket, RI. 

 

#FANTASIZ3D

 

Sculpture Details:

Title: Self Portrait as Kali

Medium: printed plastic, routed MDF, paint

Date of Creation: 11/19/2012

Size:

32.5" tall

26.194" wide

12.228" deep

 

123D Make, Self as Kali

123D Make

 

5 Last Minute Holiday Gifts to 3D Print

One of the greatest things about 3D printing technology is the ability to create what you want when you need it, rather than relying on traditional manufacturing routes - especially around the holidays. With Christmas only a few days away, now is the perfect time to forget about overnight shipping costs, so get your 3D printer up and running instead!

We will get you started with 10 ideas of what you can 3D print last minute for you friends and family. Just a note that included with any of these gifts should be a standard speech explaining how 3D printing works - people unfamiliar with the process find it new and fascinating!

 

 

1) You can't go wrong with a classic, customized tree ornament. This one is for 123D Make by user Brandon Cole

 

 

 

 

 

2) You can't go wrong with a bookmark for any friend that loves to read. Check out this octopus bookmark by Natalie Kendrick made using 123D Design

 

 

 

 

3) Jewelry is a great options for creating quick and personalized items for loved ones. Check out this link for tons of pendant and necklace ideas

 

 

 

 

 

4) With miniature terrariums being all the rage these days, your indoor gardening friend will appreciate the thought in adding a little personality to their little ecosystem - like the little 3D printed frog in this one

 

 

 

 

 

5) If you're dreaming of a white Christmas but there's no snow to be found, then consider celebrating with your own model of a snowman to keep the winter cheer alive, like this one by Lindsey Vandenberg

 

 

Bonus: If one of your gift recipients is blown away by your 3D design and printing prowess, be sure to send them towards our holiday deals for their very own MakerBot Replicator 2 and 123D Premium account so they can join in on the 3D printing fun as well.

We hope this list has helped to inspire you during the final countdown towards trading gifts. From all of us at Autodesk 123D, we wish you Happy Holidays and a fantastic New year.

Tokyo Maker Faire

Maker Faires are in full swing around the world, and Autodesk 123D got in on the action this weekend in Tokyo, Japan, a city renowned for its history of innovation. 

Carl Bass, CEO of Autodesk, even got in the action, delivering a presentation on "the appearance of new manufacturing in North America."

 

The 123D team hosted an area equipped with MakerBots, iPads with all the 123D tools installed, interlock assemblies, LED badges, duct tape bags, a black rocket shelf, and even a 3D photo booth. 

 

 It's so rewarding to see firsthand how people incorporate the 123D tools into their personal creative expression. Thank you to the thousands of smiling people of all ages that came to visit and create with us! We can't wait to do it again next year, Tokyo Maker Faire!

 

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