Multitouch Tinkercad and 123D Circuits for Windows

Have you heard the news?  The first releases of Tinkercad and 123D Circuits with multitouch just hit the Windows App Store!  Like their browser-based counterparts they're totally free and they'll run on any Windows 8.1 computer.

Let's dig into it!  Tinkercad for Windows 8.1 with multitouch now lets you Pan, Zoom, and Orbit with two fingers, which is as intuitive as it gets.  You can also drag, position and manipulate shapes just as you normally would with a mouse - now with a stylus too.

Check out this awesome hands-on video with Tinkercad:

Tinkercad with Multitouch

With 123D Circuits for Windows 8.1 you can now pan and zoom with your fingers and design and edit circuits with the stylus.  It's a great way to design using two hands and if you don't have a Windows 8.1 PC with a touchscreen or touchpad you can still download the apps and run them with a mouse as you would their browser counterparts.

Check out this video of 123D Circuits multitouch:

123D Circuits with Multitouch 

These are first-releases so if you have a Windows 8.1 PC and you use Tinkercad or 123D Circuits, we'd love to hear your feedback in the comments section below.

123D Design Desktop 1.5: Bringing the Family Together

The latest release of 123D Design for Windows and Mac doesn’t just have some cool new features - it actually helps to bring the whole 123D ecosystem together as a suite of tools for design and fabrication.

So what’s new? Some hints were already on the last version of 123D Design: we introduced the ability to open, insert and do some editing to meshes. You could open projects generated in 123D Catch right from MyProjects inside 123D Design, and also send to 3D print via Meshmixer using a one-click workflow.

Let me now explain what’s new with 1.5 and why it’s really great news for all of you.

First of all, whenever you import a mesh from 123D Catch, it most likely needs healing. In release 1.4, if you wanted to combine or subtract another mesh or solid, the meshes had to be watertight (meaning that there could be no gaps). Another issue had to do with the density of the meshes, which could make the operation slow or make it fail. So if you have a mesh that needs some help, you had to open Meshmixer, import the mesh again, do the necessary fixes and then import back into Design.

With the 1.5 release, we reduced a couple steps. By selecting any object in 123D Design, you will see an option to send to Meshmixer. This will automatically open Meshmixer with only that selection open, ready to edit. Then you can clean, remesh, reduce, sculpt, mash up, create patterns, or whatever else you wanted to do. Afterwards, simply export back into Design and you will then be able to reinsert the piece in the same location!

Another interesting use case is if you want to fabricate your design using 123D Make. You now have two options for this. You can send the entire model from the AppMenu > Send to > 123D Make. This will open 123D Make desktop with the file already imported. But now you can just send a selection by using the context menu. So if you have some extra pieces in the model that you don’t want to delete before exporting, or if you want to use different fabrication options inside 123D Make for different parts of your model (like interlocked slices for some parts but stacked slices for other parts).

The same criteria can be used for 3D printing. You can either prepare the entire file (from AppMenu > 3D Print or Ctrl+P) or just a selection (from the contextual menu) and send it to MeshMixer, which will directly open the 3D print utility. You can then analyze the part, create support for the overhangs, and print right to your desktop printer or order the part from different services (Sculpteo, iMaterialise, Shapeways).

This connection between the apps makes it quite easy to move across different processes. You can think of 123D Design as a path to both additive and subtractive manufacturing solutions (Meshmixer and 123D Make respectively).

Since we can now move selections across different applications, it really made sense to be able to also export a selection as a 123dx file or an STL file. This is also a quite useful new feature in 123D Design desktop.

But that's not all! For a while now, users have been asking for a better solution to create text. We've been working on it and we are now proud to present the new Text feature! First of all, it works offline, like the rest of the app. Secondly, it uses your system fonts! Last but not least, you can also throw the text into a sketch, so you will be able to perform different, independent operations with each closed profile. Not bad, right?

Just one more thing. Although you can use Meshmixer to process models for 3D printing - both at home and with 3rd party printers - you can also order a 3D print directly from 123D Design, provided it’s already saved in MyProjects. We've also added a new service provider - 3D Hubs!

3D Hubs provides the ability to connect with 3D printer owners near where you live or work. So if you want a fast delivery (or maybe even see your printer in person), you can print through 3D Hubs directly through 123D Design.

So check out 123D Design Desktop 1.5 and make sure you also have 123D Make and Meshmixer for a more complete experience! Also, keep sending feedback - most changes are directly from you guys, our rad users!

MeshMixer 101: Move Objects (with snapping

The Meshmixer 101 playlist is a series of videos to get you up and running with Meshmixer - allowing you to easier manipulate and edit mesh models. 

Building off of the "Move Objects" video, this will show you how to move and rotate objects around with snapping constraints for more precision.

Bryan Allen Will Decimate Your World

You may have seen a new trend in fashion and design: the angular, panelized look.  If you've ever wondered how that's done then read on!  Featured 123D user Bryan Allen has written this instructable on how to do it with 123D Make.  Check out Bryan's decimated chess pieces below, and download the full set on 123Dapp.com.

Bryan Allen is a prolific maker with serious design and 3D printing chops.  He's founding partner in Smith/Allen Design Studio and is the Chief Design Officer over at Type A Machines, a San Francisco based 3D printer company.


While working with Bryan on integrating the Type A 3D Printers into Autodesk MeshMixer we gave him a sneak peak into a new feature for 123D Make: the ability to easily panelize (or "decimate") a 3D model and export it for 3D printing.  Bryan took off and ran with it - and he's written this Instructable on how it's done.  Not only is 123D Make free, but so are tens of thousands of 3D models in our gallery.  So what are you waiting for?  Check out Bryan's InstructableDownload 123D Make and try it yourself.

Here's another example of some models standing next to their 123D Make-decimated counterparts:

What do you want to decimate?  With Autodesk's free design and fabrication tools and Bryan's instructions the possibilities are endless.  Thanks Bryan!

 

A BEAM Robot Comes To Life

"BEAM" is an acronym for Biology, Electronics, Aesthetics, and Mechanics.  I know... it's a mouthful, and it's not the first time we've brought it up.  In our first blog post about the BEAM Robot it was based on this interactive simulation we'd built in 123D Circuits.


We've since fleshed it out, including CNC-milling our own PCB with a sweet Othermill and adding 3D printed parts we designed in Tinkercad.

This BEAM is a phototrope (it reacts to light, seeking brightness).  We shot these videos under pretty bright lighting so the robot tends to drive straight off the counter top, but trust us when we say it's seeking out light and it's little limit-switch bumpers help it navigate obstacles.

 

The BEAM Robot running wild. 


Here it is before the motors and "legs" were added.  Notice how the "eyes" signal that it's reacting to different levels of light as a shadow is cast over it.  The finished robot drives by varying the voltage across the motors depending on how much light it detects on either it's left or right side.

BEAM Robot's circuitry reacting to light and shadow.

 Want the real nitty gritty?  Keep reading. Read more »

Innovation in 3D Printing Powered by Autodesk

With products ranging from stem cells, shoes and mini-statues, 3D printing has started to boom in China amid the industry's rapid development worldwide, and this was showcased at the 2014 World 3D Printing Technology Industry Conference held on June 19-22, in Qingdao, Shandong Province. This event is co-organized by the World 3D Printing Technology Industry Alliance, the China 3D Printing Technology Industry Alliance, the Asian Manufacturing Association, and the Qingdao municipal government. 

Autodesk sees an opportunity---and need---to speed the pace of innovation in the 3D printing industry. Standing at the frontier of 3D printing technology, we want to help make 3D printing accessible to millions of Chinese people by lowering existing barriers to entry and providing leading applications. The Autodesk 123D Shanghai team set up a promising booth at the aforementioned event and introduced all of our 123D offerings to the Chinese makers, professors, and students in attendance.

 

 

 

 

Chris Romes, Senior Director of Personal Design and Fabrication at Autodesk, introduced Project Spark at the Cultural Creative Symposium "3D Printing Technology Applied in Cultural Creative Industry". The goal of the project is to make 3D printing more accessible. He said, “We are developing Spark, an open and free software platform for 3D printing that will connect digital information to 3D printers in a new way.”  The audience was impressed by the information he shared,  and a large crowd came to Chris after his presentation to learn more details.

 

If you want to learn more about Project Spark, visit the project homepage, where you can get more information and sign up to receive updates. Check out the 123D website too, and see how the existing applications can help you with 3D printing today, and take you to the next level as Project Spark is rolled out.

Read more »

MeshMixer 101: Move Objects

The Meshmixer 101 playlist is a series of videos to get you up and running with Meshmixer - allowing you to easier manipulate and edit mesh models. 

This video will show you how to move things around in 3D within Meshmixer, allowing you to position objects relative to others, or orient them for 3D printing.

123D’s Newest Maker

Did you notice the new byline? Perhaps you did a double-take? By now you’re probably wondering, who is this new author on the Autodesk 123D blog?

Allow me to introduce myself. I’m Deena - the Autodesk 123D summer intern. Join me for the next ten weeks as I embark on a deep journey of self-discovery through 3D printing… Overdramatic, but you understand.

As a self-proclaimed “maker,” I’ve delighted in the realm of fabrication, trying my hand at photography, printmaking, typography, and film. However, I have never 3D printed, and am quite excited at the prospect of 3D design and execution.

For those of you just starting with 3D printing, I invite you to join in my beginner’s experience. For those of you who avidly read the 123D blog, I’m sure you’re already far ahead of me and will delight in my inevitable misadventures, reminiscing a time when you too were a fledgling maker in the 3D world.

Having that said, I can’t wait to get #START3D. I'll be sharing my journey with you each week here on the 123D blog.

Keep your eyes peeled for my next blog post, in which I will document my introduction to 3D printing through a new lens… Literally.

 

Thiago Hersan puts the Mega in MegaFone

Featured User Banner Have you ever wanted to project a message over loudspeaker, but do it remotely?  123D Circuits user Thiago Hersan and his fellow Instructables Artist-In-Residence Radames Ajna have built it - and a lot more.  Not only does their project, called "Fofoque-me: Vox Populi" project your voice over a motorized megaphone, but you can send it an SMS that will be translated to voice and that too will played aloud to curious bystanders.

Featured User Banner

 In the above picture check out the purple motor-driver board on top of the Arduino Mega -- that was designed in 123D Circuits.  Check out a video of three MegaFones during testing.

The motor drivers get a thorough testing.


To see the full system in action...

Read more »

MeshMixer 101: First Launch

The Meshmixer 101 playlist is a series of videos to get you up and running with Meshmixer - allowing you to easier manipulate and edit mesh models.

Start with this video to get the basics of the apps layout and basic navigation controls and stay tuned for more tips and tricks!