HIGHFIV3D: Autonomous Reassurance Device – Part 3

Part 3: Audio & Assembly Awesomeness

 

highfiv3d 123d project

I wrapped up March with this cool little project - it's a little late on the calendar, but there were some tweaks to be made.  Last time, I successfully programmed the Arduino to accept the accelerometer input to trigger audio files, and recorded some WAV files.  I tried the cardboard hand from Part 1, but it essentially exploded (due to the inherent awesomeness of my high-five, maybe..).  I decided to just bite the bullet and print it on our Objet printer, I may do another with flexible filament after all.

Once the files were cut and loaded on to the SD card, I finished the assembly of the hand with a base that could support a bunch of slaps.  I used the shear at TechShop San Francisco to get some 3-inch strips of mild steel, then a vise and a hammer to bang it into a 90-degree shape (I'll let you figure out how to get the other side).  

 A quick trip to the hardware store netted a spring, some threaded rod, a bushing/spacer and some locking nuts.  Basically, the hand/dowel will rotate around the threaded rod - which is locked in place with the nuts - a spring at the base will provide the tension for it to return to neutral.  I just used a C-clamp to secure it to a desk and watched my co-workers smack away.  A small USB-powered speaker with a headphone jack provides the sound, and I just picked up a dual-USB-plug to power it and the arduino board.

The random clips are pretty funny, I may do something similar soon with microphones.  The folks upstairs at Instructables have some pretty heavy feet, we've been scheming to provide them some 'feedback' when footsteps reach a certain decible level.  

 It's a pretty cool little thing to have on your desk - most people can't resist a high-five.  And that's good, because it's rude to leave someone hanging.

 

Bonus: Here's the raw footage of us recording the audio samples. 

How-To’s & Free 3D Models for Arduino’s 10th Birthday. #ArduinoD14

Arduino Day


Let’s celebrate Arduino’s 10th anniversary with some pointers on getting started with an Arduino compatible board in 123D Circuits, and a handful of free 3D models from the 123D Gallery.

In case you didn't already know: 123D Circuits is the newest addition to the 123D family of apps. One of it's finest attributes is the ability to simulate an Arduino in your browser without having to touch (ahem... blow up) any hardware. Yes, you can design circuit boards in 123D Circuits and they'll automagically arrive at your door in 10-12 days, but we're here now because we love Arduino boards and we have a few Instructables already written to get you going with an Arduino in 123D Circuits HERE and HERE.

Example circuit, press the PLAY button in the upper right hand corner to see it ping-pong with LEDs.

 

Do you already know all about Arduino? Then head on over to the Instructables Arduino contest There's still time to submit an entry. Wondering what other people are working on? People like you just voted for the winners of the 123D Circuits contest on Instructables.



If you'd like to 3D print a case look no further; the 123D Gallery is full of 3D models of various Arduino board enclosures and useful parts.  These are great 3D Models to 3D Print as-is or modify with one of our apps like MeshMixer or Tinkercad.  You can download them for free to use in your own projects!

Arduino compatible boards and other parts

Arduino Uno R3Arduino ProtoshieldBreadboardArduino Bot Platform


Cases

Arduino DiecimilaArduino LilypadArduino Due CaseArduino Extreme (Uno) Case


Cases, Bumpers, Misc.

Arduino Uno BumperTall Arduino Uno CaseArduino Galileo mountStepper Motor Driver Board

Note: Here is a complete list of Arduino-related models (100+ pcs.) found in 123D Gallery. Some models mentioned in this post are from the Premium 123D collection, however even Free 123D membership owners can download up to 10 premium models per month! 


3D print these models

Follow below steps to print these Arduino-related models on your 3D printer:

  1. Download a model of your choice by clicking on any one of the "Download model (.stl)" links found on the model pages.
  2. Download Meshmixer, a free, powerful tool from Autodesk to work with 3D models. Go to Meshmixer page for more info.
  3. Print model after setting it up and refining it in Meshmixer.

 


Register for free to download these, and many more 3D models:

Register now

123D Circuits Contest Winners!

 

You may have seen our blog post a few weeks back about the 123D Circuits contest on Instructables. Well the contest is over now, and after a whopping 222 entries we were able to select a few entrants that really went above and beyond with their projects, so we could shower them with all sorts of fancy, electronics-related gifts. Not to mention these sweet customized multi-purpose knives!

 

It was really inspiring to see your creativity in the circuits world. From robots to medical devices to things that were just plain practical, you did it all. While everyone contributed an amazing project, we are happy to announce the winners for each category!

You can find the rest of the winners here.

If you missed out on this contest, have no fear - there are lots of chances to win things. We have a Create Your Own Drone contest going right now in partnership with i.materialise, and for you circuits lovers there's also an awesome Arduino contest running on Instructables as well. 

HIGHFIV3D: Autonomous Reassurance Device – Part 2

(I only had a small speaker on hand, please forgive the audio)

I started working on the electronics component to the HighFiv3D machine this week. In my previous post, I went from using a piezo senseor to an accelerometer; then this week I decided to do a tilt sensor before getting frustrated trying to debounce it. So ACCELEROMETER it is...!

The first step was gathering parts. After a bit of advice from Gian Pablo and Rob, I figured I'd need an Arduino Uno, a Wave Shield and the accelerometer to start. We have some Arduinos on hand at Pier 9, but you can get everything from Adafruit, retailing for about $60.

The Wave Shield is basically another circuit board that sits directly on top of an Ardiuno and allows for .wav files to be played from an SD card. Now I can record the audio with my laptop, convert to the proper file type (.wav) and store them on an SD card for random play when prompted; in this case, when the accelerometer is moved.

I used Adafruit's Wave Shield Kit, v.1.1, for which they have a great tutorial on soldering and building the actual board. If you can solder, it's very simple. You'll need a 2GB SD card (it can't use anything larger) that is formatted - I used the SD formatter that Adafruit suggested, but Mac's Disk Utility will work. Once the board was built per the instructions, I only added some female headers to make testing easier.

For the accelerometer, the only soldering that's required is the wire leads that will run from the Arduino to the Shield/Arduino. I chose Yellow/Blue/Red for my X,Y and Z motions, black for power and green for ground (my electronics aptitude has been dictated by motorcycle wiring). Just leave a foot or so of wire slack to test the sensor.


Once the shield was finished, I started working on the coding. My programming experience is pretty limited (I once made a light blink with an Arduino, but that's about it). Fortunately, there is a HUGE community with pre-written codes (Sketches), so you can get away with not having to completely write it yourself. I pulled from Adafruit's example sketches for the Wave Shield and the accelerometer. The Arduino forums are a good resource too. But, since I sit next to him, I asked Gian Pablo to help me with the shield code first.

From Gian Pablo:

The great thing about using the Arduino for DIY projects is that it is so widely used that you can almost always find an example or project that to get you started. For this project, we used the WaveShield from Adafruit (https://www.adafruit.com/products/94) to provide audio output. It is a simple Arduino shield with an SD card slot and audio output. We connected an accelerometer, an ADXL335 on a breakout board.

For programming, we just used one of the examples from Adafruit as a starting point, in this case the Play6_HC example (http://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-wave-shield-audio-shield-for-arduino/play6-hc). We wanted to modify it so that instead of reading a button press to trigger the audio response, it would respond to sudden motion of the accelerometer, and allow for some time for the hand to settle down each time (if someone gave it a good whack). This only required 3 lines of code, and then we had to make some slight changes to the rest of the program so that it would choose a random response each time.

After a couple of hours we were good to go!

The only .wav files I had on hand were from Star Wars and Nacho Libre (don't ask), so I put them on the SD card, followed some directions, and voila... my little shield was talking to me. Incessantly.

Then, with the accelerometer tuned in - I was eventually able to activate random files by hitting the sensor. I was frustrated for 2 days because I kept getting an error, but we eventually realized that the file names were too long!! With just the shield, the file names didn't matter, it just played whatever is on the card. However, with the accelerometer and randomization, the same files wouldn't play because they were over 8 characters. Once I abbreviated them, it would play perfectly.

 

 

123D Circuits Contest Closes Tonight!

Just a few hours to go until the Instructables 123D Circuits contest closes!  If you haven’t already, check out the great entries so far and cast your votes for the winners.  Better yet, go to 123D Circuits and create your own entry, the prizes are AWESOME (like, oscilloscope awesome). 

There is still time! It’s free to design circuits, and you can get started with your 123D account.  We’ve certainly got our favorite entries, what are yours?

Circuits.io is now Autodesk 123D Circuits!

Every January, the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) hosts a cornucopia of new and futuristic products that are unleashed to the tech-hungry public.  We’re excited to be a part of the excitement this year by announcing that Circuits.io is officially joining the Autodesk 123D family as 123D Circuits!

 

 

123D Circuits will be joining the the free 123D apps on the digital workbench, making it easier than ever to get creative. With this acquisition, our users will now have integrated access to all their favorite online design tools, from 3D design and printing to circuitry, without ever having to leave the 123D site.

For those unfamiliar with 123D Circuits, this app enables people to design electronics online and repeatedly iterate on project ideas without encountering real-world obstacles. This program is excellent for beginners and experts alike, and we could not be happier about officially being on the same team.

Existing Circuits.io and 123D users will both get the benefits of the ecosystems.  Just go to 123d.circuits.io and log in with your Autodesk 123D account.  If you don't have a 123D account, don't worry, your existing Circuits projects will be merged after you've created one on the new Circuits.io page. Plus, those Circuits.io users with upgraded accounts will keep their benefits AND receive 123D Premium account status!

               

 

Celebrate with us by participating in the first ever 123D Circuits contest for your chance to win thousands of dollars in awesome prizes.  Welcome to Autodesk, 123D Circuits!

 
Read the full press release here.
 

TSA Loves 123D Circuits

A lot could go through your head when a day after your CEO leaves the office with a box of custom electronics you receive this email from the airport:

Uh Oh.  Would he miss the flight to Tokyo? Why couldn't we have made it look less like a Mission Impossible prop?  Don't cut the orange wire!

Then this tweet... Sounds like he made it!

So what's all the fuss about?  It turns out this little box of circuitry does something really cool: when you shake it, it's like rolling a die (singular of dice) and a huge 7-segment display on the front side cycles through numbers randomly until it slows down and stops on a digit between 1 and 6.  It was all designed with Autodesk software, specifically our brand new electronics design tool called 123D Circuits.  

Here's a link to the blog announcing the 123D Circuits launch.

Here's a detailed Instructable on how it was made so you can build one too.

                

In the end Carl Bass prevailed.  He and the die made it to the Tokyo Maker Faire unencumbered.

 

 

If you're interested in more than electronics check out our complete suite of 123D apps for 3D modeling and 3D printing.  You can even make 3D models using just photographs.  Autodesk 123D makes it easy from start to finish (even from an airport!)

 

Introducing 123D Circuits

123D Circuits Banner 

Autodesk... Electronics... Really?  YES.  It is with great pleasure and excitement that we announce the launch of 123D Circuits - today! 

At Autodesk we work hard to empower you with an ever growing lineup of free 3D tools.  But why stop there?  We were eager to help take your projects one step further.  To do so, we teamed up with Circuits.io to bring you what we think is the very best electronics design tool on the market: 123D Circuits.  But you don't have to take my word for it, see for yourself... (Note: 123D Circuits links will open a new tab on a separate website)

 

 

Here are some of the most compelling features:

  • Virtual breadboard based design, allowing to build and experiment with circuits just as you would in real life.
  • You can add an Arduino to your design, and edit the code right in your browser.
  • Real-time and interactive simulation of both your Arduino code and the circuit attached to it.
  • Full collaborative editing (think of Google Docs for electronics).
  • Powerful yet easy component editor, making it super easy to add new components to the shared library.
  • Easily create beautiful circuit boards with: free text, b-splice silkscreen art, arbitrary board shapes, …
  • Ability to embed your design, including simulation on your blog or in an Instructable.

SOURCE: blog.circuits.io website.

123D Circuits can be found in our new Sandbox page, a place for us to release new technologies and experiments - or directly through the 123D Circuits web page.  Keep checking back for more exciting application announcements - this won't be the last...!