The Mighty Midwest presents: The Art Institute of Chicago

 

When it comes to 3D printing a lot of media attention is paid towards the coastal cities of the United States. California has Silicon Valley with its exponentially growing startup world, while New York has long played host to a thriving art and technology scene. And yet between the two lies Chicago, a hidden gem in the world of fabrication and customization. Recently we had the opportunity to explore the many maker spaces, museums, and makers themselves all dedicated to revitalizing the values of their City's past through embracing the technologies of the future.

The landscape of America is changing, and signs of this are everywhere. The midwest may be the largest indicator: where once the titans of industry stood, now stands what looks to the untrained eye like ramshackle warehouses and long-abandoned factory lines. But through the ashes blooms the new industrial revolution, the engine that is driving our society forward. 

 

Over the next month we will showcase a new aspect of Chicago's maker scene every week, starting with the extremely well-regarded museum, The Art Institute of Chicago. They are using 123D Catch as 3D scanning technology to provide a brand new experience to their visitors, a practice which will surely be adopted by institutions worldwide once they see how the AIC visitor experienced is transformed in such a positive way. Watch the video above to see firsthand how 3D scanning, modeling, and printing technology is playing a role at the Art Institute of Chicago. Be sure to check back each week this month for more.

 

Maker of the Day – Andy Lee (Day 25)

 

 

Andy Lee

Why I make

I've always made stuff. It's an exploration i've been on for a long time. I am interested in how everything is made. All things from how is steel forged to how are silicone etched and packaged or how does a designer decide what the visual details they might add to their products.

Making stuff leads me on these journeys where I discover new ways that things can be made and built. 

What I make

Most of the things I make are tools for living. I've made lines of furniture and household accessories. I've been interested in robotics for a long time. In 2008 I made my own 3D printer in my apartment on my kitchen table. Everyone asked if they needed 3D goggles.

I made a chess board that had a gantry with a magnet underneath the board. It could adjust the magnet and move the pieces around. There was an RFID reader which could read tags that we placed in the base of the pieces. 

Right now I am exploring aperiodic stacking patterns of polyhedrons.

See more of Andy's work at http://5cell.net/

 

Maker of the Day – Thiago Hersan (Day 21)

Thiago Hersan

Why I make

It helps me think about things and it helps me communicate things about thoughts.

What I make

Installations and apps that deal with mediated spaces in human-human communication; why we communicate, and how. 

Maker of the Day – Adrian Stein (Day 19)

 

Here is a Maker Of The Day that we have been excited to share with you for some time. Everything that art, 3D printing, and the maker movement is, has revealed itself through the work of this individual. But what can we say about Adrian? In addition to his skills with Meshmixer and 3D manipulation, Mr. Stein is also a gifted writer and speaker, so we will let him speak for himself.

Adrian Stein

Why I make

This is a far too existential of a question for me to answer in short form, my attempt to condense it might be a little confusing, so I apologize in advance. A feeling of cold emptiness takes over my stomach when I become hungry for food, I can stand it, sometimes its hard, but other things distract me. When I have hunger for expression, a feeling of empowering energy, coupled with anxious necessity springs my eyes to an eternal gaze, my throat becomes clogged by the oncoming wave of thought, speaking becomes insufficient, I must make. It helps me clear my mind, by making I am able to see my emotions, feel them physically. Although, sometimes I need to make things that are emotion-less, sometimes making is forgetting, sometimes making is un-making. I came to think of it as my escape, my escape from anything I need to feel; on the other side, it became my gateway, any land I wanted to reach I figured I must make. Making, art, is my therapy. 

What I make

The majority of my practice revolves around the three dimensional object; I find this to be the realm with the least restrictions. There is something incredibly attractive about an object you can touch, smell, interact with, and look at in all angles; it creates an almost intimate dance between the viewer and the piece, creating small conversations, intrapersonal connections, brief moments of intimacy, memories, laughter and cries. Objects have a very interesting power, we deal with them on a daily basis but a lot of us seem to ignore them; when some are presented formally they take on thisrevealing, ephemeral quality. Suddenly, they become easier to “see”, the objects reveal their meaning, information that makes way for different interpretations in every revisit, it is the closest thing to a film for me, without the moving image. I figure that this came from my early addiction to Lego play sets, a driving point for my artistic development. This is where my insatiable thirst saw its beginning, merely satisfied by the low quality, yet nearly endless possibility of these small plastic blocks; I grew to become a creator, continuously imagining and then feverishly making. As I grew older I visited more materials (metal,wood, other brands of building blocks, found objects, clay) yet that thirst got stronger and stronger. It became so fierce that I had begun to loath, even hate, the amount of conformity that my materials involved, the endless drying times, the sometimes irreversible mistakes, the brittleness of some materials and the unbendable stoutness of others, my tongue had become too dry. Therefore I sought a new invigoration, I needed to change by brand of electrolytic buildable. I needed something that could be manipulated with more liberty, something that would set the creatures inside my head free. This made me recede from the physical, and into the virtual; something I found would be a turning point in my practice. Now I almost never leave my computers side, it has become my companion in life, it houses every material I ever dreamed of, any landscape I could imagined, any tool is at my disposal there; but I couldn’t touch it, I couldn’t smell it ,I couldn’t grab it and put it in my pocket, I again became thirsty. This drought did not linger for too long, I quickly crossed paths with the most awe-inspiring bridge i had ever seen, 3D printing. This new discovery completed the circle I wished forever to fulfill; I could finally bring my visions to life. I encountered programs like Meshmixer and Tinkercad, this new virtual clay wouldn’t bend with gravity (if I wanted it to), it could form to my disposal, I can choose where and why it is strong, I can combine it, scale it, transform it, and manipulate it to my will; and then, as if it were straight from the Jetsons, I can print it. Nothing but a dream come true. Currently,with around 4 months in the field, I see my practice voyaging in this fruitful ocean. 

5LDRmH on Make A Gif, Animated Gifs

 

Stay tuned for more coming from this amazing maker - Adrian has been generous enough to keep in great contact with us, and we are looking forward to continuing to share his story with you as it progresses.

 

Here's a sneak peek of what's to come - a bracelet Adrian designed using Meshmixer of the waveform diagram of himself saying the words, "I Love You." Pretty neat, right?

Maker of the Day – Semi Han (Day 9)

 

Semi Han

Why I make

I enjoy all mediums of art, as an AS level student in London. Sculpture isn't done very often in the curriculum, so I do it as a hobby rather than for school work. 

What I make

Paintings, drawings, sculptures. Normally I sculpt faces and character design concepts of a similar theme.

 

 

Autodesk and Lincoln team up for 3D printed creativity at Great Create

Autodesk was pleased to partner with the Lincoln Motor Company at the Great Create, a fundraising event at the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. Autodesk provided large scale 3D printed models of the new 2015 Lincoln Navigator, to be painted by two artists on site, Charlie Skala and Chisum Pierce. In addition, we provided smaller models of the car to be painted by children attending the event.

Over 200 of the little cars were painted by children at the event, in a wide variety of colors and designs.

Staff from Autodesk's 123D consumer software group demonstrated a 3D printer at the event, just like the one used to produce the smaller models.

The process of creating these models and preparing them for 3D printing was interesting. Keep reading to learn more!

Read more »

123D Creations with Dazed and Confused: The Fourth and Final Installment

Here is the fourth and final installment in the collaborative Dazed and Confused series where we joined up with four world-renowned artists to see what each of their unique sets of creativity, insight and skills would create with our products. It is not often that a project this unique and amazing comes along, and we are sad that this is the last in the series.

This segment focuses on Ana Rajcevic. Ana is an award-winning fashion artist whose work spans sculpture and fashion design. A constant theme in her work is the transformation of the human body through complex adornments or body-sculptures. She seeks to exhibit the duality of "fashion artefacts" in he artwork, and the final result of her 123D creation exhibits the "mutation and evolution" of her creative practice. 

Using 123D Catch Ana designed an insect-inspired hairlike facade, 800 hairs to be precise, to a hand-sculpted life-size headpiece. These hairs were too fine to be crafted without the use of technology, but were no problem for 123D Catch, so they were 3D printed. Despite the riskiness of the project and the challenges faced by the 3D printers in bringing the sculpture to life, "the look on Ana's face when she admires her 'artificial exoskeleton' catching the light in her studio is proof positive of the power of 3D printing to astound even a seasoned professional in materials design."

Check out the video below for more details

 

 

It has been a wonderful and rewarding experience seeing what these four talented artists can do when handed the reins to 3D printing technology by Autodesk 123D, and we are excited to see how this project inspired our other 123D users in their approach to 3D design and art.

123D Creations with Dazed and Confused: Part 3

This week brings us the third installment in the 123D Creations series with Dazed and Confused. For this project London-based artist Yuri Pattison took a closer look at the Chelyabinsk Meteor that lit up Russia's sky for a brief moment in February 2013. He became fascinated with the subsequent "fragments of meteor" that appeared for sale on eBay at a much higher cost than other meteorites online.  

Using the photos from the eBay listings, Yuri created 3D models on 123D Catch, despite not having every angle necessary to create a perfect capture. He then printed 3D models of the meteorites, inconsistencies included, to emphasize the "example of traditional culture fetishizing the 'original' object,” wherein the representation of the object becomes just as valuable, if not more so, than the original object despite not being the real thing. Through 3D printing technology Yuri is able to bring his vision to life. See more details in the video below and by reading the Dazed article about the project.

 

In this digital age, there is no doubt that the lines between original and re-creation are becoming blurred. Yuriy states, "That's what's interesting about digital for me, and the possibilities of reproduction like 3D printing: the information contained and conveyed is the most important thing rather than copy vs original!"

123D Creations with Dazed and Confused: Part 2

Today we bring you part 2 of our installment on 123D Creations with Dazed and Confused. This week's focus is on world renowned artist Clement Valla. Clement has been a long time researcher into technology and its role in Fine Art and creative expression. When working with 123D Catch he became inspired by the "texture maps" that exist in the intermediary between capturing a 3D image and refining said image. 

 

 

Ultimately what Valla communicates is the apophenia, or "the very human tendency to see meaningful patterns in noise, such as faces in clouds," that exists in the 123D Catch capture process. For more details on this amazing project, visit Dazed online.

123D Creations with Dazed and Confused

By now you've likely heard about the brand new 123D Catch for iOS 7 - it makes turning photographs into detailed 3D models even faster and easier - read more about the improvements here.

To celebrate the release we want to share an amazing story that combines the technology of 123D Catch with the beauty of art by announcing 123D Creations! This project comes in collaboration with our friends over at Dazed and Confused, and together we embarked on a journey with four artists to explore their creativity using 3D design and printing technology. Over the next month we will share how the artists have used the Autodesk 123D suite to express themselves. 

For the first installation, artist Lawrence Lek opted to use 123D Catch to create a piece he calls "KI$$." Check out the video below to see how Lek transformed his vision into a tangible reality using 123D Catch.

 

 

Isn't that amazing? Head over to Dazed for more details, and don't forget to keep checking back here for upcoming projects over the next few weeks!

 

 

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