Maker of the Day – Scott Kildall (Day 27)

 

 

Scott Kildall

Why I make

Creative energy sustains me and by making physical things, I transform thoughts into form. I view new technologies as an opportunity to experiment with possibilities that is completely new, but pays homage to older traditions. 

The data crystals reflect this transformation from virtual into material using technology that wasn't available 10 years ago.

What I make

Data Crystals are a series of 3D-printed sculptures, which I generate algorithmically from various data sources. These manifest a vision of what data physically looks like — one possibility for 3D data visualization.

My source for the data crystals range from city-provided open datasets such as construction permit and crime statistics to biometric data generated by human bodies such as physical movement or EEG (brainwaves) data. 

I see data as sculptural material, like clay, plaster or steel. By using code to transform columns of numbers into 3D models, I call myself a “data miner,” where I extract data into small gems. I’m still experimenting with legibility and aesthetics. The primary question that drives this work is the question of “what does data look like?” 

 

 

Maker of the Day – Andy Lee (Day 25)

 

 

Andy Lee

Why I make

I've always made stuff. It's an exploration i've been on for a long time. I am interested in how everything is made. All things from how is steel forged to how are silicone etched and packaged or how does a designer decide what the visual details they might add to their products.

Making stuff leads me on these journeys where I discover new ways that things can be made and built. 

What I make

Most of the things I make are tools for living. I've made lines of furniture and household accessories. I've been interested in robotics for a long time. In 2008 I made my own 3D printer in my apartment on my kitchen table. Everyone asked if they needed 3D goggles.

I made a chess board that had a gantry with a magnet underneath the board. It could adjust the magnet and move the pieces around. There was an RFID reader which could read tags that we placed in the base of the pieces. 

Right now I am exploring aperiodic stacking patterns of polyhedrons.

See more of Andy's work at http://5cell.net/