123D Circuits Video Series : Servo and More!

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Ready to get your How-To on?  We've recorded a handful of awesome new videos that teach basic and advanced concepts of electronics in 123D Circuits.  Each video is based on an existing circuit and with one click you can duplicate it, learn from it, and build it into bigger and better projects.  

Circuit: Arduino and Servo


Circuit: Potentiometer


Circuit: Blink LED with an Arduino


Circuit: Oscilloscope Basics

For more 123D Circuits how-to videos please visit the 123D Circuits Playlist.

123D Circuits : Blink LED with an Arduino

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This week's video on Electronics teaches you how to blink LEDs with an Arduino in the 123D Circuits virtual circuit simulator.  Its super-simple because the code is already pre-written and saved into the Arduino.  Opening it and making changes is a snap!  And don't stop there... we're growing the list of how-to videos every week!

This link will take you to the playlist of all videos 


So far we've been keeping it simple by getting the main point across in under a few minutes, but if you watch the whole video you'll also learn some engineering science!  Check out the video below.

Click here to open the original circuit in 123D Circuits.

123D Circuits is a fantastic place to go to build electronic circuits without leaving your computer.  It's as simple as dragging together components and watching them come alive in your web browser.  It's fast, it's free, and it's quite powerful.


You can do this yourself, just head over to 123D Circuits and sign in, then create a "New Breadboard Circuit" then follow along with the video.  You never know, this could be the beginning of something big - we think so!

 

 

123D Circuits Video Series : Measure Current

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This week's video on Electronics teaches you how to measure electrical current with a multimeter in the 123D Circuits virtual circuit simulator.  This is the companion video to last week's "Measure Voltage with a Multimeter".  You may follow along with the video, or just watch and be entertained.
This link will take you to the playlist of all videos 


So far we've been keeping it simple by getting the main point across in under a few minutes, but if you watch the whole video you'll also learn some engineering science!  Check out the video below.

Want to see the finished Current Measurement circuit?  Here's the link!

123D Circuits is a fantastic place to go to build electronic circuits without leaving your computer.  It's as simple as dragging together components and watching them come alive in your web browser.  It's fast, it's free, and it's quite powerful.


You can do this yourself, just head over to 123D Circuits and sign in, then create a "New Breadboard Circuit" then follow along with the video.  You never know, this could be the beginning of something big - we think so!

 

 

123D Circuits Video Series : Measure Voltage

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In continuing our new video series on Electronics we're hoping you walk away from this tutorial knowing how to measure voltages in real life and in the 123D Circuits virtual circuit simulator.  You may follow along with the video, or just watch and be entertained.
This link will take you to the playlist of all videos 


In this video we're still keeping it simple by getting the main point across in under two minutes.  If you watch all 7 minutes you may even learn some engineering science!  Check out the video below.

Want to see the finished Voltage Measurement circuit?  Here's the link!

123D Circuits is a fantastic place to go to build electronic circuits without leaving your computer.  It's as simple as dragging together components and watching them come alive in your web browser.  It's fast, it's free, and it's quite powerful.


You can do this yourself, just head over to 123D Circuits and sign in, then create a "New Breadboard Circuit" then follow along with the video.  You never know, this could be the beginning of something big - we think so!

 

 

123D Circuits Video Series : Light an LED

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Update: This is the first video in a series where we teach electronics through simple, short videos using 123D Circuits.  You may follow along with the video, or just watch and be entertained by the nerdy voice-over.  This link will take you to the playlist of all videos.


In this first video we're starting with the very basics: how a breadboard works and how to use one to connect an LED to a battery with a resistor and one wire.  Check out the video!

123D Circuits is a fantastic place to go to build electronic circuits without leaving your computer.  It's as simple as dragging together components and watching them come alive in your web browser.  It's fast, it's free, and it's quite powerful.


You can do this yourself, just head over to 123D Circuits and sign in, then create a "New Breadboard Circuit" then follow along with the video.  You never know, this could be the beginning of something big - we think so!

 

 

Maker Faire Rome

When in Rome... Come to Maker Faire!
Autodesk has a booth full of things to touch and play with.  Get hands on with 123D Circuits, Tinkercad, Instructables, 123D Catch on iPad, and pose for photos with the Instructables mascot.

We've also got tons of T-shirts to give away and real live people to answer your questions on our software - in native Italian and half-Italian half-English  :)

We're located on the 2nd floor of the MIRZAKANI area.  Follow Jesse and the footprints! 

We like seeing what you've made too!

Keep checking back for Maker Faire Rome blogs complete with more photos of what we've seen.
Ciao!

Autodesk + Electroninks + Cricut, a Collaboration

Maker Faires are special places where people gather to push the limits of creative expression and get hands-on with new technology.  Friendships are forged and collaborations between makers strengthen the growing movement.  Last weekend's Maker Faire in New York only reinforced this.Lining up at the gate for Maker Faire Rome 2014


In the next days and weeks keep reading our posts about cool stuff we saw at Maker Faire New York and the upcoming Maker Faire in Rome.


We wanted to start by showing the combined technology of 123D Circuits' new Circuit Scribe simulator (screen shot below), Electronink's conductive-silver pens, and Cricut's newest machine: the Explore.  The result was a working electrical circuit – in just five minutes.  (video below)

Check out the screen shot of the new Circuit Scribe virtual editor below – it's the first step in the process.

Annotated screen shot of the new 123D Circuits Circuit Scribe virtual editor

And here it is in action.  You can even hear Maker Faire in the background!
 
We'll keep collaborating and experimenting until we're ready to release the whole process as an export feature of 123D Circuits to Cricut.  We encourage you to try new things too.

You're reading about electronics but have you tried our FREE app that converts photographs into 3D models?  It's called 123D Catch and it's available for iOS, Android, PC, and in-browser if you're a Mac user.

Get Yourself Featured on 123D !

Do you like checking out the 123D Featured Users but feel like it's missing a little... "you"?   Fill out the form below and you could be the next Featured User!   The most interesting projects might just wind up here, or even on the screens of our apps.  What are you waiting for ?!?!  Hit the read more link.

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Featured User : Bryan Perry Keeps It Level

We have a saying in English about being 'up a creek without a paddle'.  What that means is: you're in deep trouble and there's no way out.  Well, 123D Circuits user Bryan Perry's pump station monitor circuitry is built to prevent such a situation - because it's all about keeping the levels of water (or whatever's in the tank) within safe levels.

When we found out a 123D Circuits user was designing something that's part of a modern civic infrastructure we just had to feature him.  It's this kind of circuit that keeps cities from flooding in winter and reservoirs at proper levels year-round.

In a nutshell here's how they work: There's a water storage tank underground.  Inside are three floats at different levels.  When water rises it makes the bottom float rise, then the middle float.  When this happens the circuit tells a pump to move some water out of the tank and thus lower the level of water.  When the water drops below the first two floats the circuit then tells the pump to turn off.  All good, BUT if the water was rising so fast the third float rises the circuit will turn on the second pump.  For an interactive breadboard simulation where you can click on the "floats" - check out this extra circuit Bryan made.


In the picture above the two blue clips can detect current flowing through a wire and are how the circuit can tell if the pumps are actually running or not.  If they're not running when they're supposed to the circuit will send Bryan a text (see the Sprint box, that's what that's for). The black cylinder is a backup 5V battery and the green terminal blocks on Bryan's circuit connect to the pumps and floats.  The microcontroller on the board is a SPARK CORE.
The board below was designed in 123D Circuits.
Bryan pressed the "Order" button and 10 days later the PCBs arrived. 

Click the Read More button to continue and see Bryan's circuit embedded in the blog!   Read more »

You Can Simulate a 555 Timer in 123D Circuits

It is an absolute joy to make this announcement about a tiny, unassuming chip that has changed the world:  You read it first here.  You can simulate a 555 in 123D Circuits!

Whether you knew it or not, we've all touched a 555.  They're inside appliances like toaster ovens, microwaves, alarm clocks, little robots, zillions of toys, early computers and even a few spacecraft.  They're everywhere!

Don't believe us?  According to their original 1971 inventor, Hans Camenzind, production has steadily ramped up to an astonishing 1 BILLION 555s being made per year, and they crossed that threshold in 2003!


For the announcement we put together an example circuit that when connected to a servo lets you control the angle (or position) by turning a potentiometer.  Click the Read More button to load it.   Read more »