White House 3D Printed Ornament Contest!


When you’ve got a big house to decorate for the holidays, advanced planning is wise. So naturally, the White House is already thinking about this year’s holiday decor, and we're going to help them deck their halls. Instructables is excited to partner with the Smithsonian and the White House in this 3D Printed Ornament Challenge. Some of the winners of this challenge will have their work printed and hung in the East Wing of the White House during the holiday season. Additionally, those selected to be displayed at the White House will be featured on the Smithsonian’s state of the art 3D data platform, 3d.si.edu and will join a small collection of White House ornaments in the political history division of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History.

You don’t need to have a 3D printer to participate — design an ornament with any 3D modeling software and up to 8 winning designs will be 3D printed and shipped to the White House for you. New to 3D modeling? No sweat! Head over to Tinkercad and play around with making 3-dimensional shapes. It’s really fun, and you’ll learn an awesome new skill, to boot. This is your chance to make White House history and have your art featured in their first-ever maker challenge.

The model should be no larger than 3”x 3” and reflect the magic and wonder of the holidays, so think ornaments that represent winter sports, toys, activities, symbols, and anything that inspires you during the festive winter season. Want to incorporate a little twinkle to your designs as well? Design a piece that fits or clips onto a string of lights!

To qualify, you must be a U.S. resident and create an Instructable for your ornament — and be sure to include the .stl file!  Click HERE for more info.

Adafruit’s 3D Printed Retro Mari Clouds

Adafruit #3DThursday

123D Superstar users Noe and Pedro Ruiz of Adafruit Industries are back with another awesome 3D printing + electronics hybrid project - and they've published the files on our site with instructions.  


You can watch these guys whip up 3D printed projects LIVE every 3D Thursday, but today we've posted this great video their latest project.  Scroll down for everything you need to build it yourself!

Check out Adafruit's detailed instruction page for the step-by-step instructions and links to their electronics shop.


The "Mari Clouds"  enclosure was modeled in our free 3D modeling software called 123D Design (click to download).  You can find the original design files and ready-to-3D print files on the Mari Clouds Project Page on our site, 123Dapp.com.  While you're there check out Adafruit's other awesome projects on 123Dapp.com.


We love talking about Noe and Pedro's projects.  If you have something you'd like us to feature just drop us your info at our get-featured page!

123D Make (Love)

We've seen some really great usage of 123D Make this week! While most folks are constrained to a relatively small scale, with desktop CNC or lasers at a local TechShop, we found some artists and designers who are pushing their creations to human scale (and beyond).

                              

First, we got an email from down under: Georgia Morgan in Broome, Australia, has made a full-scale figure from 3mm steel using 123D Make.  It's a pretty elegant use of the radial slicing feature, and we're so honored to have been a part of it!

 

Over in Europe, Lana Awad teamed up with Fab Textiles and FabLab Barcelona to create "Rig", a life-size mannequin that was showcased at Fab10 in July.  


From Fab Textiles: "The design for RIG is an exploration into the creative potential of mannequins as tools for exhibiting and work with. RIG is a manifestation on how tools should be rethought, redesigned, and reimagined..."  We couldn't agree more, and we love seeing such an ambitious use of the 123D tools.


Perhaps the most impressive, in terms of scale... while installing our Autodesk Gallery Pop-Up in Paris, the team stopped by the Paris Auto Show and saw a giant elephant cut from cardboard!  

I know there are others out there joining their massive radial slices together!  What did we miss?

 

Autodesk / Tinkercad win big at 3D Print Show Awards!

Thanks so much for everyone that voted in this year's 3D Print Show Awards!

We're so honored to have won Brand of the Year (Autodesk) and Best Online/App-Based Service (Tinkercad) and proud to have such a great community of designers, modelers and Tinkerers!

Congrats also to all the other winners - well deserved!

 

Join The Open Source Dress – Using Tinkercad

For anyone who follows Anouk Wipprecht or is just hearing about her infamous, interactive 3D printed dresses - This is a chance to add YOUR design sensibility to one of her couture-creations...  Anouk x Polaire will be assembling 3D printed "Particles" made by people all over the world - into a complete "Open Source Dress".  There is still time to send your particle.

On the left: some of the smaller prototype dress.  On the right: a particle sent in by a contributor.  


Anouk added LED rings to some of her own particles, using them as examples.

Here's more... check out what people are making on Tinkercad by filtering for #ParticleDress:

To participate is quite simple if you or a friend have a 3D printer.  The easiest way is to simply 3D print this existing part in Tinkercad or if you're the creative type : change that 3D model in Tinkercad so it has your own personal style - then send the print to:

THE OPEN SOURCE ELEMENT DRESS 
Anouk Wipprecht x Polaire 
Schottenfeldgasse 72/8c 
1070 Wien, Austria

*** For all the details --- Check out Anouk's Instructable ***


We took a little time out of our day and designed / 3D printed a couple particles.  Have a look:

Below left is our version of their base model, it will easily print on a Makerbot or similar 3D printer (click to Tinker-it). Below middle is the "spikey" particle you see above, and below right is the "balloon" particle" you see above in white.


You can start with the base model (might require support material) or our blue/orange version of the base model (you can change the colors) that will require no support material.

If you don't have a 3D printer you're not out of luck.  There are several professional companies eager to perfectly-print your models and we've got them lined up on our 3D-Print page.  

Hope to see your particles on the Open Source Dress!
-123D

Lets Talk About 3D Printing – On #3DThursday

Adafruit #3DThursday

Back on the 4th of July we featured two super-users Noe and Pedro Ruiz of Adafruit.  Well, they're back with another sweet project: this 3D printed case for the new RaspberryPi B+ that they designed in one of our 3D modeling apps: 123D Design.  Check it out below.

You can check out the full project, see more pics and download the native 123D Design files.
Want the files for 3D Printing or the alternate smiley faceplate?
You can check out their video about it and links to instructions

If you're interested in knowing more about how it was 3D modeled (or about the Raspberry Pi in general) you can ask them yourself, LIVE during their regular #3DTHURSDAY Google+ hangout.  It's where they talk about cool things that they've made for 3D Printing or that they've found on the web in places like Instructables.com.  It's every Thursday at 3PM EST (noon PST) learn more about how to join or click the top banner.  Don't be shy, we'll be there too.  Pop-in, ask your questions or share your knowledge about 3D printing projects!

 

Get Yourself Featured on 123D !

Do you like checking out the 123D Featured Users but feel like it's missing a little... "you"?   Fill out the form below and you could be the next Featured User!   The most interesting projects might just wind up here, or even on the screens of our apps.  What are you waiting for ?!?!  Hit the read more link.

Read more »

PLANT3D Part 2: Bike Edition

One day I was meandering through the print shop when the Instructables intern, Rachel, casually mentioned to me that she was working on a bike commuter Instructable. At that moment, my calling became apparent. I needed to 3D print a planter for mounting on bikes. After all, who doesn’t want to cruise through the streets in the company of another living, green being, conveniently mounted to their handlebars?

To build the planter, I started with a blank canvas in 123D Design. (I prefer to use the desktop version, but this is definitely feasible in the online version as well.) I started with a cube from the primitives menu approximately three-quarters of the size of my air plant.

Rachel mounted the other parts of her commuter project to her bike via ziptie, so I created a ziptie-sized half-circular hole to keep the look uniform. This was done with a series of concentric circle sketches that were extruded in a particular order; you can find a thorough account of the process in this Instructable.

Bike-mounted, 3D-printed planters are a green, simple way to pimp your ride. The file is available for download on the Instructable, so get printing and be prepared to be the envy of bike commuters everywhere.

 

Adafruit’s Noe & Pedro Ruiz Bring the Freshness

Some people need little introduction and Adafruit's Noe Ruiz is one of those people.  His projects on 123Dapp.com stand up with some of the best we've ever seen, and that's saying something!


UPDATE: Noe is part of a Duo!  Noe and his brother Pedro Ruiz get together on 3D Thursday at Adafruit to 3D model and 3D Print their projects.  They often get the party started by 3D modeling in Autodesk's 123D Design.  We highlighted one to start, check out Adabot!


Adabot can be downloaded from 123Dapp.com and 3D printed as individual pieces and assembled (with electronics courtesy of Adafruit).  Or you can open it up and edit in 123D Design.  Keep reading to see how... Read more »

123D Design Desktop 1.5: Bringing the Family Together

The latest release of 123D Design for Windows and Mac doesn’t just have some cool new features - it actually helps to bring the whole 123D ecosystem together as a suite of tools for design and fabrication.

So what’s new? Some hints were already on the last version of 123D Design: we introduced the ability to open, insert and do some editing to meshes. You could open projects generated in 123D Catch right from MyProjects inside 123D Design, and also send to 3D print via Meshmixer using a one-click workflow.

Let me now explain what’s new with 1.5 and why it’s really great news for all of you.

First of all, whenever you import a mesh from 123D Catch, it most likely needs healing. In release 1.4, if you wanted to combine or subtract another mesh or solid, the meshes had to be watertight (meaning that there could be no gaps). Another issue had to do with the density of the meshes, which could make the operation slow or make it fail. So if you have a mesh that needs some help, you had to open Meshmixer, import the mesh again, do the necessary fixes and then import back into Design.

With the 1.5 release, we reduced a couple steps. By selecting any object in 123D Design, you will see an option to send to Meshmixer. This will automatically open Meshmixer with only that selection open, ready to edit. Then you can clean, remesh, reduce, sculpt, mash up, create patterns, or whatever else you wanted to do. Afterwards, simply export back into Design and you will then be able to reinsert the piece in the same location!

Another interesting use case is if you want to fabricate your design using 123D Make. You now have two options for this. You can send the entire model from the AppMenu > Send to > 123D Make. This will open 123D Make desktop with the file already imported. But now you can just send a selection by using the context menu. So if you have some extra pieces in the model that you don’t want to delete before exporting, or if you want to use different fabrication options inside 123D Make for different parts of your model (like interlocked slices for some parts but stacked slices for other parts).

The same criteria can be used for 3D printing. You can either prepare the entire file (from AppMenu > 3D Print or Ctrl+P) or just a selection (from the contextual menu) and send it to MeshMixer, which will directly open the 3D print utility. You can then analyze the part, create support for the overhangs, and print right to your desktop printer or order the part from different services (Sculpteo, iMaterialise, Shapeways).

This connection between the apps makes it quite easy to move across different processes. You can think of 123D Design as a path to both additive and subtractive manufacturing solutions (Meshmixer and 123D Make respectively).

Since we can now move selections across different applications, it really made sense to be able to also export a selection as a 123dx file or an STL file. This is also a quite useful new feature in 123D Design desktop.

But that's not all! For a while now, users have been asking for a better solution to create text. We've been working on it and we are now proud to present the new Text feature! First of all, it works offline, like the rest of the app. Secondly, it uses your system fonts! Last but not least, you can also throw the text into a sketch, so you will be able to perform different, independent operations with each closed profile. Not bad, right?

Just one more thing. Although you can use Meshmixer to process models for 3D printing - both at home and with 3rd party printers - you can also order a 3D print directly from 123D Design, provided it’s already saved in MyProjects. We've also added a new service provider - 3D Hubs!

3D Hubs provides the ability to connect with 3D printer owners near where you live or work. So if you want a fast delivery (or maybe even see your printer in person), you can print through 3D Hubs directly through 123D Design.

So check out 123D Design Desktop 1.5 and make sure you also have 123D Make and Meshmixer for a more complete experience! Also, keep sending feedback - most changes are directly from you guys, our rad users!