Halloween DIY: Turn your head into a disembodied candy jar :0

Our friend Maker's Muse has come up with another interesting use of our apps, 123D Catch and Meshmixer. He's really good and I recommend subscribing to his YouTube channel, as he regularly creates these insightful videos about 3D printing.

This time Maker's Muse captures his head with 123D Catch and brings it into Meshmixer to hollow out for a sliced off zombie head full of candy. Check out the video below for his process. 

If you are having trouble capturing someone's head with 123D Catch, you can refer to a previous blog post: How To Capture a Person with 123D Catch.

Happy Halloween!

Harsha P’s Clock Simulation is Right-on-Time

123D Circuits user and Instructables contest finalist Harsha P is back in the news again with his most excellent digital clock simulation.  Try it out, press the PLAY button in the upper right corner:

"Hours" by Harsha P.


Although Harsha does make printed circuit boards he has mostly focused on the breadboard simulation in 123D Circuits.  He says his favorite aspects of the application are the multimeters that can pinpoint the voltage at any node and measure the current through loops.  We agree, the multimeters are great, check out an example below:

three multimeters shown in breadboard simulation


There's more... Read more »

123D Design Desktop 1.5: Bringing the Family Together

The latest release of 123D Design for Windows and Mac doesn’t just have some cool new features - it actually helps to bring the whole 123D ecosystem together as a suite of tools for design and fabrication.

So what’s new? Some hints were already on the last version of 123D Design: we introduced the ability to open, insert and do some editing to meshes. You could open projects generated in 123D Catch right from MyProjects inside 123D Design, and also send to 3D print via Meshmixer using a one-click workflow.

Let me now explain what’s new with 1.5 and why it’s really great news for all of you.

First of all, whenever you import a mesh from 123D Catch, it most likely needs healing. In release 1.4, if you wanted to combine or subtract another mesh or solid, the meshes had to be watertight (meaning that there could be no gaps). Another issue had to do with the density of the meshes, which could make the operation slow or make it fail. So if you have a mesh that needs some help, you had to open Meshmixer, import the mesh again, do the necessary fixes and then import back into Design.

With the 1.5 release, we reduced a couple steps. By selecting any object in 123D Design, you will see an option to send to Meshmixer. This will automatically open Meshmixer with only that selection open, ready to edit. Then you can clean, remesh, reduce, sculpt, mash up, create patterns, or whatever else you wanted to do. Afterwards, simply export back into Design and you will then be able to reinsert the piece in the same location!

Another interesting use case is if you want to fabricate your design using 123D Make. You now have two options for this. You can send the entire model from the AppMenu > Send to > 123D Make. This will open 123D Make desktop with the file already imported. But now you can just send a selection by using the context menu. So if you have some extra pieces in the model that you don’t want to delete before exporting, or if you want to use different fabrication options inside 123D Make for different parts of your model (like interlocked slices for some parts but stacked slices for other parts).

The same criteria can be used for 3D printing. You can either prepare the entire file (from AppMenu > 3D Print or Ctrl+P) or just a selection (from the contextual menu) and send it to MeshMixer, which will directly open the 3D print utility. You can then analyze the part, create support for the overhangs, and print right to your desktop printer or order the part from different services (Sculpteo, iMaterialise, Shapeways).

This connection between the apps makes it quite easy to move across different processes. You can think of 123D Design as a path to both additive and subtractive manufacturing solutions (Meshmixer and 123D Make respectively).

Since we can now move selections across different applications, it really made sense to be able to also export a selection as a 123dx file or an STL file. This is also a quite useful new feature in 123D Design desktop.

But that's not all! For a while now, users have been asking for a better solution to create text. We've been working on it and we are now proud to present the new Text feature! First of all, it works offline, like the rest of the app. Secondly, it uses your system fonts! Last but not least, you can also throw the text into a sketch, so you will be able to perform different, independent operations with each closed profile. Not bad, right?

Just one more thing. Although you can use Meshmixer to process models for 3D printing - both at home and with 3rd party printers - you can also order a 3D print directly from 123D Design, provided it’s already saved in MyProjects. We've also added a new service provider - 3D Hubs!

3D Hubs provides the ability to connect with 3D printer owners near where you live or work. So if you want a fast delivery (or maybe even see your printer in person), you can print through 3D Hubs directly through 123D Design.

So check out 123D Design Desktop 1.5 and make sure you also have 123D Make and Meshmixer for a more complete experience! Also, keep sending feedback - most changes are directly from you guys, our rad users!

Thiago Hersan puts the Mega in MegaFone

Featured User Banner Have you ever wanted to project a message over loudspeaker, but do it remotely?  123D Circuits user Thiago Hersan and his fellow Instructables Artist-In-Residence Radames Ajna have built it - and a lot more.  Not only does their project, called "Fofoque-me: Vox Populi" project your voice over a motorized megaphone, but you can send it an SMS that will be translated to voice and that too will played aloud to curious bystanders.

Featured User Banner

 In the above picture check out the purple motor-driver board on top of the Arduino Mega -- that was designed in 123D Circuits.  Check out a video of three MegaFones during testing.

The motor drivers get a thorough testing.


To see the full system in action...

Read more »

123D Make 3D DIY Projects. Made With Cricut.

photo of paper projects next to a Cricut Explore machine

Looking for a fun DIY project, but not prolific with scissors or don’t own a laser cutter? We’re happy to announce that Autodesk 123D has partnered with Cricut to bring a series of easy-to-assemble 3D DIY projects to Makers and Crafters. From rocket ships to dinosaurs to smartphone stands, these projects will delight and entertain boys and girls of all ages whether you’re 5 or 50!
 

All you need to get started is an affordable Cricut Explore™ electronic cutting machine, the free online Cricut Design Space™ software, and off-the-shelf poster board. Cardboard brown is no longer your only color option!


The first 8 projects are pictured below, clicking on them will take you to their respective project pages.  If you already own a Cricut Explore, load up the poster board and start cutting! The smartphone stand will make a great Fathers' Day present!

And make sure to keep checking back on Autodesk 123D's Blog and Cricut Partner Page, as well as Cricut's Autodesk Projects Page for even more projects!


What's the origin story of these beautiful projects, you ask? These first-of-its-kind 3D Cricut projects started off as 3D models from the 123Dapp.com gallery. The models were then infused with the unique slicing technology of 123D Make and transformed into easy-to-assemble cut patterns!

 

p/s. Full instructions coming soon to an Instructable near you! 

Glow-in-the-Dark Rocket Mobile with 123D and Tinkercad

We've been thinking about rockets and spaceships this week at 123D and we had some cool glow-in-the-dark filament for a Makerbot Rep2, so naturally: GLOW IN THE DARK SPACESHIPS!

The models came directly from the 123Dapp.com gallery, and the planets, end caps and filament points I quickly modeled in Tinkercad. Because the rockets were taller than would fit on a Makerbot, I imported them into MeshMixer to chop them in half witht the Slice tool. Slicing them also allowed for printing without support material.  With a little Krazy Glue, you get more size options.

If you want to make this yourself, you can try downloading more and different rockets. We've collected together a bunch of really varied rocket designs. ( <- click to see the collection and download!)

The trickiest part of a mobile is (perhaps obvious) is the balancing of all the elements - both physically and visually.  I printed a couple different sizes of rockets and planets, with varying infills so that I would have options when I started assembling it.  Only after printing the last rocket did I realize I could have just modeled the eyelets, but there you have it.

In total, the project cost about $15 in parts and materials: monofilament, eyelets, dowels and krazy glue. 

 

This is a perfect weekend project - and the glow-in-the-dark filament is available from Makerbot.  See the whole project here on 123dapp.com.  What are you making for SPAC3D?

HIGHFIV3D: Autonomous Reassurance Device – Part 1

During the month of March, there are a few different music-themed things happening: SXSW and more festivals you can shake a stick at (it's even Music in our Schools Month!), so we're thinking about sound and music here at 123D. There are tons of great related models in the 123D gallery that we'll be remixing and playing with for the next few weeks, and a couple of us will be focusing on sound-related projects using 123D Circuits - look for #LISTEN3D 

As an at-best-novice with electronics, I decided to step lightly and integrate Circuits with some other projects I've been wanting to try. The first is, naturally, a High-Five machine.  While it has nothing to do with music, per se, I think I'll learn a lot about the audio/electronics side and 123D Circuits.

The idea is this: a free-standing hand that you can interact with for a bit of reassurance when walking to get a cup of coffee.  When you give it a healthy palm smack, it will generate some positive words of encouragement - think "You're Awesome!" or "Oh Yeah!".  Within a cardboard-stacked hand, a sensor would register impact and trigger the audio. My first thought was a Piezo sensor in the hand, but after some words of wisdom (and a high-five) I decided to go with an accelerometer that would determine when the hand was moved, thus activating the audio output.

The Mona Lisa started out on notebook paper, btw.

The first step is building the physical hand and then we'll figure out how the passerby will interact with it - table mounted seems the easiest, but wall-mounted would be a little cooler.  I considered using 123D Catch to create a model of my own hand and arm, but while messing around on 123D Creature, I found a really great model by Mark Dollar!  It's a bit cartoonish and big, so it should be perfect.

 

 

I downloaded the model and opened it in MeshMixer to open up the fingers a bit more for a proper high-five.  Then took it into Tinkercad to work on the cut out.  I think a 1" dowel is a fine way to make the 'arm'.  I also made a little hollow for the accelerometer.  

 

Once I was happy with the cutout, it was on to 123D Make to generate the slices for the laser cutter.  I wanted to keep it close to human scale, so I made it about 9" tall.  Once cut, the only tedious bit was the fingers (hopefully they'll withstand some trauma).  

 

 

Now I need to go shopping, look for next steps and more Sound & Music posts soon.

 

 

Make It REAL-ly Scary with 123D and Tinkercad: Contest Winners Announced!

Creepy Head Halloween Candy Bowl by HollyMann

It was a hard job, but we've finalized the winners of our Halloween 123D Contest on Instructables!  There were some really great entries, but our judges have spoken.  Check out the winners:

The Grand Prize went to HollyMann for her Creepy Head Halloween Candy Bowl model!  She's won a Zebra Imaging holographic 24x34 print, color, with frame and light, $100 in iMaterialise 3D print credit and a 123D prize pack including a 123D t-shirt and 2 year Premium Membership, as well as an Instructables prize pack including a robot t-shirt.

 The First Place winners were: Creating a Witch with 123D Creature by Adam BeamishScary 5ft jack-in-the-box (from Tinkercad … by lockershop; and Pumpkin BBQ by nathan nash.  They scored one Zebra imaging holographic 8x10 print, color, with frame and light, $50 in iMaterialise 3D print credit, a 123D prize pack including a 123D t-shirt and 1 year Premium Membership and an Instructables prize pack.

The Runners Up won some great stuff too! A discount for 20% off an iMaterialise 3D print, a 123D prize pack including a t-shirt and 1 Month Premium Membership and an Instructables prize pack.

Thanks to Zebra imaging, iMaterialise and Instructables for their help with contest and prizes, but even bigger thanks to all the entrants - keep it up and look for more challenges soon!

Tokyo Maker Faire

Maker Faires are in full swing around the world, and Autodesk 123D got in on the action this weekend in Tokyo, Japan, a city renowned for its history of innovation. 

Carl Bass, CEO of Autodesk, even got in the action, delivering a presentation on "the appearance of new manufacturing in North America."

 

The 123D team hosted an area equipped with MakerBots, iPads with all the 123D tools installed, interlock assemblies, LED badges, duct tape bags, a black rocket shelf, and even a 3D photo booth. 

 

 It's so rewarding to see firsthand how people incorporate the 123D tools into their personal creative expression. Thank you to the thousands of smiling people of all ages that came to visit and create with us! We can't wait to do it again next year, Tokyo Maker Faire!

 

M-M-Movember!

Now that Halloween is over and we are collectively recovering from eating too much candy, it's time to get our faces ready for the annual mustache-growing competition, Movember, to raise awareness for men's health.

A few of us on the 123D team are ladies and unable to grow mustaches of our own, but thanks to 3D printing we can still compete with the guys!

 

Head over to our new Projects section to get ideas and templates on mustaches for yourself! Happy November/Movember everybody!