White House 3D Printed Ornament Contest!


When you’ve got a big house to decorate for the holidays, advanced planning is wise. So naturally, the White House is already thinking about this year’s holiday decor, and we're going to help them deck their halls. Instructables is excited to partner with the Smithsonian and the White House in this 3D Printed Ornament Challenge. Some of the winners of this challenge will have their work printed and hung in the East Wing of the White House during the holiday season. Additionally, those selected to be displayed at the White House will be featured on the Smithsonian’s state of the art 3D data platform, 3d.si.edu and will join a small collection of White House ornaments in the political history division of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History.

You don’t need to have a 3D printer to participate — design an ornament with any 3D modeling software and up to 8 winning designs will be 3D printed and shipped to the White House for you. New to 3D modeling? No sweat! Head over to Tinkercad and play around with making 3-dimensional shapes. It’s really fun, and you’ll learn an awesome new skill, to boot. This is your chance to make White House history and have your art featured in their first-ever maker challenge.

The model should be no larger than 3”x 3” and reflect the magic and wonder of the holidays, so think ornaments that represent winter sports, toys, activities, symbols, and anything that inspires you during the festive winter season. Want to incorporate a little twinkle to your designs as well? Design a piece that fits or clips onto a string of lights!

To qualify, you must be a U.S. resident and create an Instructable for your ornament — and be sure to include the .stl file!  Click HERE for more info.

Lets Talk About 3D Printing – On #3DThursday

Adafruit #3DThursday

Back on the 4th of July we featured two super-users Noe and Pedro Ruiz of Adafruit.  Well, they're back with another sweet project: this 3D printed case for the new RaspberryPi B+ that they designed in one of our 3D modeling apps: 123D Design.  Check it out below.

You can check out the full project, see more pics and download the native 123D Design files.
Want the files for 3D Printing or the alternate smiley faceplate?
You can check out their video about it and links to instructions

If you're interested in knowing more about how it was 3D modeled (or about the Raspberry Pi in general) you can ask them yourself, LIVE during their regular #3DTHURSDAY Google+ hangout.  It's where they talk about cool things that they've made for 3D Printing or that they've found on the web in places like Instructables.com.  It's every Thursday at 3PM EST (noon PST) learn more about how to join or click the top banner.  Don't be shy, we'll be there too.  Pop-in, ask your questions or share your knowledge about 3D printing projects!

 

Get Yourself Featured on 123D !

Do you like checking out the 123D Featured Users but feel like it's missing a little... "you"?   Fill out the form below and you could be the next Featured User!   The most interesting projects might just wind up here, or even on the screens of our apps.  What are you waiting for ?!?!  Hit the read more link.

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How to easily generate 3D Printable enclosures for your electronics projects in 123D Circuits

We've been blogging a lot recently about 123D Circuits projects and users but it's time we talked about the "3D" in the name.

While circuits are typically designed in a 2D UI the 123D Circuits app will generate a perfect-fitting 3D enclosure for your Circuit.  Check out this 3D printed example of an enclosure generated by 123D Circuits: The Theremin.Theremin with Enclosure

Keep reading to check out how easy 3D modeling an enclosure can be with 123D Circuits.

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HIGHFIV3D: Autonomous Reassurance Device – Part 3

Part 3: Audio & Assembly Awesomeness

 

highfiv3d 123d project

I wrapped up March with this cool little project - it's a little late on the calendar, but there were some tweaks to be made.  Last time, I successfully programmed the Arduino to accept the accelerometer input to trigger audio files, and recorded some WAV files.  I tried the cardboard hand from Part 1, but it essentially exploded (due to the inherent awesomeness of my high-five, maybe..).  I decided to just bite the bullet and print it on our Objet printer, I may do another with flexible filament after all.

Once the files were cut and loaded on to the SD card, I finished the assembly of the hand with a base that could support a bunch of slaps.  I used the shear at TechShop San Francisco to get some 3-inch strips of mild steel, then a vise and a hammer to bang it into a 90-degree shape (I'll let you figure out how to get the other side).  

 A quick trip to the hardware store netted a spring, some threaded rod, a bushing/spacer and some locking nuts.  Basically, the hand/dowel will rotate around the threaded rod - which is locked in place with the nuts - a spring at the base will provide the tension for it to return to neutral.  I just used a C-clamp to secure it to a desk and watched my co-workers smack away.  A small USB-powered speaker with a headphone jack provides the sound, and I just picked up a dual-USB-plug to power it and the arduino board.

The random clips are pretty funny, I may do something similar soon with microphones.  The folks upstairs at Instructables have some pretty heavy feet, we've been scheming to provide them some 'feedback' when footsteps reach a certain decible level.  

 It's a pretty cool little thing to have on your desk - most people can't resist a high-five.  And that's good, because it's rude to leave someone hanging.

 

Bonus: Here's the raw footage of us recording the audio samples. 

123D Circuits Contest Winners!

 

You may have seen our blog post a few weeks back about the 123D Circuits contest on Instructables. Well the contest is over now, and after a whopping 222 entries we were able to select a few entrants that really went above and beyond with their projects, so we could shower them with all sorts of fancy, electronics-related gifts. Not to mention these sweet customized multi-purpose knives!

 

It was really inspiring to see your creativity in the circuits world. From robots to medical devices to things that were just plain practical, you did it all. While everyone contributed an amazing project, we are happy to announce the winners for each category!

You can find the rest of the winners here.

If you missed out on this contest, have no fear - there are lots of chances to win things. We have a Create Your Own Drone contest going right now in partnership with i.materialise, and for you circuits lovers there's also an awesome Arduino contest running on Instructables as well. 

123D Circuits Contest Closes Tonight!

Just a few hours to go until the Instructables 123D Circuits contest closes!  If you haven’t already, check out the great entries so far and cast your votes for the winners.  Better yet, go to 123D Circuits and create your own entry, the prizes are AWESOME (like, oscilloscope awesome). 

There is still time! It’s free to design circuits, and you can get started with your 123D account.  We’ve certainly got our favorite entries, what are yours?

Enter the 123D Circuits Contest

Now that 123D Circuits is officially part of the family, we figured there's no better way to celebrate than to give stuff away! Submit any circuits-related project to the 123D Circuits contest on Instructables for your shot at winning prize packages valued at almost $1,500 each!! Protip: using 123D Circuits in your project is advisable if you want to win some of the special Judges' Prizes.

 

123D Circuits Contest

 

Go check out 123D Circuits now to start making things with this awesome new tool. Once you've documented all your hard work head over to Instructables to enter the contest. Folks of all skill level are encouraged to participate, whether you are brand new to electronics or a well-seasoned electrical engineer. 

Circuits.io is now Autodesk 123D Circuits!

Every January, the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) hosts a cornucopia of new and futuristic products that are unleashed to the tech-hungry public.  We’re excited to be a part of the excitement this year by announcing that Circuits.io is officially joining the Autodesk 123D family as 123D Circuits!

 

 

123D Circuits will be joining the the free 123D apps on the digital workbench, making it easier than ever to get creative. With this acquisition, our users will now have integrated access to all their favorite online design tools, from 3D design and printing to circuitry, without ever having to leave the 123D site.

For those unfamiliar with 123D Circuits, this app enables people to design electronics online and repeatedly iterate on project ideas without encountering real-world obstacles. This program is excellent for beginners and experts alike, and we could not be happier about officially being on the same team.

Existing Circuits.io and 123D users will both get the benefits of the ecosystems.  Just go to 123d.circuits.io and log in with your Autodesk 123D account.  If you don't have a 123D account, don't worry, your existing Circuits projects will be merged after you've created one on the new Circuits.io page. Plus, those Circuits.io users with upgraded accounts will keep their benefits AND receive 123D Premium account status!

               

 

Celebrate with us by participating in the first ever 123D Circuits contest for your chance to win thousands of dollars in awesome prizes.  Welcome to Autodesk, 123D Circuits!

 
Read the full press release here.
 

Nut & Bolt Puzzle Project using Tinkercad

Here's a pretty great project we found on Instructables- a perfect little print to test a desktop 3D printer AND make a stocking stuffer! What seems like a simple nut-and-bolt assembly is deceptively difficult to take apart.  But there's a trick!  We're going to try and print some today to test.

nut_and_bolt_puzzle_tc