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Maker of the Day – Benjamin Delman (Day 24)

 

 

Benjamin Delman

Why I make

Making has found its way into all aspects of my life long ago. Whether that was building my first computer from parts, rebuilding a carburetor on a motor, deviating from a recipe in the kitchen, or building a website. I've found making something myself to be incredibly rewarding.

Naturally, when it came to giving gifts, I wanted to include that DIY attitude. Sometimes that was making the gift itself. This past December, it was just a small piece of the packaging. In all scenarios, it added that custom, personalized touch that leaves a lasting impression. 

What I make

December 2013, I had been taking a handful of classes at Autodesk's Pier 9. Rather than buying some gift tags off the shelf, I took the opportunity to use the laser cutters again and make my own. I found some Christmas themed vector art online, imported it into Illustrator, and tweaked it to fit the gift tag outline I had drawn. After adding some recipient names, these custom gift tags were ready to attach to a gift box with a little ribbon. 

 

 

Maker of the Day – Susi Holman (Day 14)

Susi Holman

Why I make

Friends and family always inspire me to make something new. I usually start a new project because I want to make something special for someone, that no one else can give them. 

What I make

From baby blankets to laser-cut jewelry:

Laser cutting:
- etched champagne glasses, layered scenes in shadow boxes - acrylic and wood earrings, etched plaques / cards, holiday ornaments

Sewing
- baby blankets - dresses, bags / purses

Crocheting
- gloves, scarves, hats, baby stuffed animal snuggle blankies

 

Maker of the Day – Martin Horn (Day 5)

Martin Horn

Why I make

I like making beautiful things. Access to digital fabrication technology made it possible for me to design my work in a software environment & be confident that my tools would create it with a level of precision that would result in a high quality piece. Precise, repeatable results has become much easier as the cost of robotic tools has fallen.

What I make

Laser cut lighting, CNC routed screens & furniture, waterjet cut screens and structures.

Check out Martin's amazing work, like the lamp below, on his website.

Maker of the Day – Niti Parikh (Day 3)

For our third Maker of the Day, meet Niti Parikh. Niti is a Bay Area TechShop user and super-maker, making the world happier one unique piece of wall art at a time.

Niti Parikh

Why I make

I have been making things using my hands and fulfilling my inner urge to create constantly since I was a kid. It was a natural choice for me to then pursue design as a career. 

When I am making a good meal, a product pieces together at the shop or making a drawing for an Interior Space I am designing for, it makes me HAPPY . I count making things as my super power, which I want to share as much as I can in this lifetime. Making is my way of giving back!

What I make

When I founded NPStudio, I wanted to make things, which is going to combine my experience from the field of Architecture and keep my love of crafts alive. Today through product line of HAPPYcardboards I make unique wall art for all ages and interiors. Each piece is hand assembled from recycled cardboard and a variety of reclaimed materials. We have also had a chance to take our methods of making with reclaimed cardboard to mainstream events and replace everyday pipe and drape stage backdrop with a backdrop made solely with recycled cardboard. We are now involved as a consultant for sustainable décor/fabrication for events and spaces.

To see more of Niti's work, check out http://nitiparikh.com.

HIGHFIV3D: Autonomous Reassurance Device – Part 1

During the month of March, there are a few different music-themed things happening: SXSW and more festivals you can shake a stick at (it's even Music in our Schools Month!), so we're thinking about sound and music here at 123D. There are tons of great related models in the 123D gallery that we'll be remixing and playing with for the next few weeks, and a couple of us will be focusing on sound-related projects using 123D Circuits - look for #LISTEN3D 

As an at-best-novice with electronics, I decided to step lightly and integrate Circuits with some other projects I've been wanting to try. The first is, naturally, a High-Five machine.  While it has nothing to do with music, per se, I think I'll learn a lot about the audio/electronics side and 123D Circuits.

The idea is this: a free-standing hand that you can interact with for a bit of reassurance when walking to get a cup of coffee.  When you give it a healthy palm smack, it will generate some positive words of encouragement - think "You're Awesome!" or "Oh Yeah!".  Within a cardboard-stacked hand, a sensor would register impact and trigger the audio. My first thought was a Piezo sensor in the hand, but after some words of wisdom (and a high-five) I decided to go with an accelerometer that would determine when the hand was moved, thus activating the audio output.

The Mona Lisa started out on notebook paper, btw.

The first step is building the physical hand and then we'll figure out how the passerby will interact with it - table mounted seems the easiest, but wall-mounted would be a little cooler.  I considered using 123D Catch to create a model of my own hand and arm, but while messing around on 123D Creature, I found a really great model by Mark Dollar!  It's a bit cartoonish and big, so it should be perfect.

 

 

I downloaded the model and opened it in MeshMixer to open up the fingers a bit more for a proper high-five.  Then took it into Tinkercad to work on the cut out.  I think a 1" dowel is a fine way to make the 'arm'.  I also made a little hollow for the accelerometer.  

 

Once I was happy with the cutout, it was on to 123D Make to generate the slices for the laser cutter.  I wanted to keep it close to human scale, so I made it about 9" tall.  Once cut, the only tedious bit was the fingers (hopefully they'll withstand some trauma).  

 

 

Now I need to go shopping, look for next steps and more Sound & Music posts soon.

 

 

Halloween(3D)! Playing with 123D at the Autodesk offices.

We've been getting into the spirit of Halloween at the Autodesk offices, and I'm taking the opportunity to test what I can do with the 123D apps.  

123D Make is great for making models at a larger scale cheaply and quickly.  Granted, we have some Epilog lasers at the shop that sure beat an Xacto knife, but it's all stuff you can do with technology that's available to you, either by hand or through 3D printer service, or your own machines.  123D Creature has an awesome community that is making some pretty impressive monsters, and Tinkercad is great for some quick fixes to 3D models.

 

Cardboard Cthulhu at Autodesk offices.

Cthulhu Guards the Gold:
I made a big cardboard Cthulhu based on a 123D Creature model by super-user Amanda Jackson to lord over the snack machines in Autodesk's Pier 9 kitchen.  In the 123D Gallery, there are literally thousands of models to choose from - and there's no better tool than 123D Make to make it big.  Just grab some glue.

 

cardboard devil in 123D make

Cardboard Devil:
I came across a really great model of the devil character from Legend.  The Tim Curry-Satan guy.  All I can remember is him hissing at Tom Cruise, 'Boiyyyyy...'.  This particular model is cool because it started out as a Darth Maul bust by Adam Beamish, then Kaj Steveman took the wireframe and ran with it to create The Darkness.  Now he lives at my desk.  Next, I'm going to paint him the appropriate red and black.

 

 

SKULLpilepsy!!:
This one seems to be an office favorite - I love using RGB LED strips and I wanted to use the semi-transparent nature of 3D prints as a lamp.  It's pretty great, and remote controlled! 

 

Goldfish Ghost: 
For the Goldfish Ghost project, I just grabbed a great model from Tinkercad by user Chuck Norris (I really really hope it's really Mr. Norris), and ordered some Encapso from Smooth-On.  Voila - Ghost Fish!

 

There are some more in the works from me, but stay tuned to the Instructables' Make it REALly Scary contest to see other great projects..! 

 

MAKE IT REAL-LY SCARY WITH 123D – NOW LIVE ON INSTRUCTABLES!

 

We've officially launched a contest on Instructables called Make it Real-ly Scary with 123D

The contest runs through the end of October and is open call for people to use any of the 123D apps as a component to their Halloween project.  It can be as simple as remixing another user's model or as time-consuming as laser-cutting a giant Cthulhu that terrorizes the kitchen at the Autodesk offices.  

We have some pretty great prizes too! Our friends at Zebra Imaging and iMaterialise are the Prize Providers for the contest and have forked over some pretty righteous goods.  Grand prize is a HUGE hologram (24"x34") from Zebra Imaging, $100 print credit with iMaterialise, and a 2-year Premium membership to 123D!  Zebra hasn't offered this size hologram directly to our users before, so we're excited to see one.

Good luck!

Carbon Fiber guitar. Go Make one this weekend with 123D.

Last month in San Francisco, TechShop members had a little party over the weekend to make their own custom guitars. That's rad enough, but the workshop aimed one step further and taught them how to do it in Carbon Fiber.

The process is simpler than you'd think.  With a basic guitar body design, you can build a model in 3D software (123D Design is free), then take that file via an .stl model into 123D Make, which slices the model into cross sections that you can laser cut (or go analog and grab an Exacto blade).  Once those are stacked and glued together, you have a mold!!  Read this Instructable on how to do to do it, you'll get no spoilers here.

OR, you can listen to the Safety Third Show - in Episode 1, they go through the experience of the workshop and Blaine sings a little song.

Here's the coverage on Wired Design:


Laser Cut Record Monsters

A First Look at RecordMonsters

This is a fantastic idea to reuse old records - turn them into tiny sculptures! I found the Record Monsters project while browsing the interwebs and just had to share it.

The Record Monsters project was wildly popular on kickstarter, and rightly so! What other things would you do with an old record and a laser cutter? I'm envisioning fancy coasters, tiny photo easels, wall decorations, all sorts of things!

It'd be easy to recreate something like this using 123D Make , too! But be careful about cutting records - the fumes are not good for you or your laser cutter - you'll need a really powerful exhaust system.

Via kickstarter.

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