123D Make (Love)

We've seen some really great usage of 123D Make this week! While most folks are constrained to a relatively small scale, with desktop CNC or lasers at a local TechShop, we found some artists and designers who are pushing their creations to human scale (and beyond).

                              

First, we got an email from down under: Georgia Morgan in Broome, Australia, has made a full-scale figure from 3mm steel using 123D Make.  It's a pretty elegant use of the radial slicing feature, and we're so honored to have been a part of it!

 

Over in Europe, Lana Awad teamed up with Fab Textiles and FabLab Barcelona to create "Rig", a life-size mannequin that was showcased at Fab10 in July.  


From Fab Textiles: "The design for RIG is an exploration into the creative potential of mannequins as tools for exhibiting and work with. RIG is a manifestation on how tools should be rethought, redesigned, and reimagined..."  We couldn't agree more, and we love seeing such an ambitious use of the 123D tools.


Perhaps the most impressive, in terms of scale... while installing our Autodesk Gallery Pop-Up in Paris, the team stopped by the Paris Auto Show and saw a giant elephant cut from cardboard!  

I know there are others out there joining their massive radial slices together!  What did we miss?

 

Get Yourself Featured on 123D !

Do you like checking out the 123D Featured Users but feel like it's missing a little... "you"?   Fill out the form below and you could be the next Featured User!   The most interesting projects might just wind up here, or even on the screens of our apps.  What are you waiting for ?!?!  Hit the read more link.

Read more »

Sean Cusack’s Fire-Roasted Heart

123D user and master fabricator Sean Cusack may have a heart of gold, but in this instance he's here to melt hearts... Hearts made of half-inch (~12 mm) steel.  So don't get to close, this one's going to be hot!


What you're looking at is a welded steel heart, suspended by chains over a 12 million BTU, propane burning hot air balloon burner.  I bet you can guess what that does : turn steel red hot!

Sean says if the burner was left on long enough the steel would completely melt.  Sounds pretty cool, but we're also interested in how it was made.  Sean started with a simple 3D model of a heart (like this example, free on the 123D gallery), sliced it in half with MeshMixer, and used 123D Make to turn the remaining half-heart into slices that fit together nicely before welding.


Below is the half-heart before and after in 123D Make.  What looks like a complex 3D structure of interwoven slices was generated by 123D Make with just a few clicks.  You can download Sean's 3D Models and the sliced 123D Make from the 123D Project Gallery here's the link!

Hit the Read More link to see the process... Read more »

Harsha P’s Clock Simulation is Right-on-Time

123D Circuits user and Instructables contest finalist Harsha P is back in the news again with his most excellent digital clock simulation.  Try it out, press the PLAY button in the upper right corner:

"Hours" by Harsha P.


Although Harsha does make printed circuit boards he has mostly focused on the breadboard simulation in 123D Circuits.  He says his favorite aspects of the application are the multimeters that can pinpoint the voltage at any node and measure the current through loops.  We agree, the multimeters are great, check out an example below:

three multimeters shown in breadboard simulation


There's more... Read more »

Bryan Allen Will Decimate Your World

You may have seen a new trend in fashion and design: the angular, panelized look.  If you've ever wondered how that's done then read on!  Featured 123D user Bryan Allen has written this instructable on how to do it with 123D Make.  Check out Bryan's decimated chess pieces below, and download the full set on 123Dapp.com.

Bryan Allen is a prolific maker with serious design and 3D printing chops.  He's founding partner in Smith/Allen Design Studio and is the Chief Design Officer over at Type A Machines, a San Francisco based 3D printer company.


While working with Bryan on integrating the Type A 3D Printers into Autodesk MeshMixer we gave him a sneak peak into a new feature for 123D Make: the ability to easily panelize (or "decimate") a 3D model and export it for 3D printing.  Bryan took off and ran with it - and he's written this Instructable on how it's done.  Not only is 123D Make free, but so are tens of thousands of 3D models in our gallery.  So what are you waiting for?  Check out Bryan's InstructableDownload 123D Make and try it yourself.

Here's another example of some models standing next to their 123D Make-decimated counterparts:

What do you want to decimate?  With Autodesk's free design and fabrication tools and Bryan's instructions the possibilities are endless.  Thanks Bryan!

 

Maker of the Day – Domenic di Giorgio (Day 31)

 

 

Domenic di Giorgio

Why I make

When I look at something that interests me my first thought is always  "How could I make that?"

It becomes a challenge and an exciting chance to learn something. A new technique or material or technology.

Recently I have become obsessed with making tools to help makers make more. In particular a low-cost laser cutter/engraver. I enjoy watching makers take tools and use them in ways they were never imagined to be used in.

Very inspiring.

 

What I make

These days with the tools we (makers) have available to us, I can say that I make "Whatever I want to" 

I started making gliders and planes out of balsa and tissue paper when I was young and my need to make things grew and grew.. Now I use composite materials, cnc machines, 3d printers and laser cutters! Times and technology may have changed, but the feeling of having made something from start to finish never changes. 

I enjoy experimenting with cad, electronics, programming, robotics as well as getting my hands dirty on a lathe or mill.

I make things that capture my interests. 3d printed arduino controlled robotic arms, useless-machines in Pringles cans, tools to help me make more things. 

Too much to make and just not enough time!

 

 

Maker of the Day – Gerry Paquette (Day 29)

 

 

Gerry Paquette

Why I make

I teach board game design in a Game Development program at Algonquin college in Ottawa. The college Print Shop recently invested in 3D printers and I encourage my students to make use of it by creating custom bits for their games. As first-year students, most of them haven't had any training using 3D software. Tinkercad is the ideal entry-level tool that does not overwhelm it's users with options. In fact, limited options allows for a more creative approach to design. 

Once the students have sent me their models in .STL format, I'm able to preview them in Tinkercad and make modifications in terms of sizing and thickening elements that are likely to break before sending them on to be printed. 

What I make

I use Tinkercad to make custom board game components primarily. Recently I used it to create a flea circus as part of my costume for local Steampunk 5 year anniversary gala. 

My current project, Battle Cubed, is a tactical 3- dimensional space fighting game that features 3D printed ships and a 2D stand with platforms that are laser cut out of acrylic and assembled into a 3-tiered playing surface.

 

 

Maker of the Day – Andy Lee (Day 25)

 

 

Andy Lee

Why I make

I've always made stuff. It's an exploration i've been on for a long time. I am interested in how everything is made. All things from how is steel forged to how are silicone etched and packaged or how does a designer decide what the visual details they might add to their products.

Making stuff leads me on these journeys where I discover new ways that things can be made and built. 

What I make

Most of the things I make are tools for living. I've made lines of furniture and household accessories. I've been interested in robotics for a long time. In 2008 I made my own 3D printer in my apartment on my kitchen table. Everyone asked if they needed 3D goggles.

I made a chess board that had a gantry with a magnet underneath the board. It could adjust the magnet and move the pieces around. There was an RFID reader which could read tags that we placed in the base of the pieces. 

Right now I am exploring aperiodic stacking patterns of polyhedrons.

See more of Andy's work at http://5cell.net/

 

Maker of the Day – Thiago Hersan (Day 21)

Thiago Hersan

Why I make

It helps me think about things and it helps me communicate things about thoughts.

What I make

Installations and apps that deal with mediated spaces in human-human communication; why we communicate, and how. 

Maker of the Day – Zachary Vorhies (Day 20)

Zachary Vorhies

Why I make

I love making wearable fashion! I've always had an interest in the clothes people would make for Burning Man, the most fantastic place on earth (for that week).

One year I met a fashion designer, Wheylan Dean-Ford, who makes costumes for rockstars and movies. He ended up crashing at my house after Burning Man and we got to talking about fashion. He was struggling with putting electronics into his outfits and since I love electronics, I was more than able to help him out. That got us to talking about my own outfit that I wanted to create. The idea that I had was to do a mashup of a glow stick and a CamelBak so we created this thing that called the Hydropak, which is like a CamelBak, but glows to the sound of music.

The Hydropak outfit was a really big hit with my friends and so I started wearing it all the time. One time I wore it to a fashion show and the organizer snapped a picture of me and said, "Who made this amazing outfit?" and I was like, "I did!" He responded, "Why don't you make five more like this and I'll put it on the fashion runway?" 

So I called my designer friend who was living in New York and said, "Hey, want to fly to San Francisco and help me make five outfits for this fashion show?" He was like, "Okay!" So we did it. 

The following week we started a massive one month work session creating five fashion pieces. One of these pieces was the Turn Signal Glove which you can see at: www.futuretechwear.com 

When we showed off the gloves, the response was overwhelming: "YOU MUST MAKE MORE OF THESE TURN SIGNAL GLOVES!" 

So from there on out I was on a mission to create the best cycling glove in the world. I said goodbye to my job at Google and said hello to the wonderful world of entrepreneurship, and the rest is history. 

What I make

Turn Signal Gloves - www.zackees.com
Kickstarter and made $72.5k in sales in just 30 days. CNET said that they were “...enough to encourage a new era of turn signal use.” 

Lightup Outfits - www.futuretechwear.com These are some outfits I created to showcase my talent. 

LED Piano - https://www.youtube.com/watch? v=5V2d0_P9cLo

I designed the electronics and built the software. The fabrication of the piano was carried out by the artist, William Jerome, who also uses it in his performances in his band, Interstellar Transmissions. 

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