From the Makers: Tinkercad to 3D print!

Lining up at the gate for Maker Faire Rome 2014At the last couple of Maker Faire events, lots of people told us how they used Tinkercad for all their 3D printing. We're so honored to have such loyal users!   I thought I'd reflect here on some of the most popular features, in case some of you weren't aware.  Anything I missed? Screen Shot 2014-10-04 at 7.05.01 AM- Water-Tight STL files
Tinkercad is great as a last point of prep before sending a model to the printer.  The Import function can make the most stubborn files magically heal themselves, allowing you to re-export or add a solid base for stability.

 

Screen Shot 2014-10-04 at 6.52.07 AM - Direct to 3D print service capability.
A couple of clicks is all that stands between you and a full color print of your model (or Peter D. Penguin).  Just go to Design > Order a 3D Print.  

 

SVG Import
You can import a line drawing in an SVG file format to extrude right in Tinkercad (or even 123D Design).  

 

- Slicing a Larger Print for Sectional Printing.
We covered this in a recent TinkerTip, but using 2 boxes as holes allows you to keep a clean seam when breaking up a larger model into multiple prints.  

Maker Faire New York – it’s a wrap!

In continuation with our coverage of Maker Faire New York, check out the photos below! Maker Faire is always a good time, and this year's festival in New York was no exception. Tinkercad, Instructables, 123D Circuits, and more attracted new makers, long time designers, families, and guests from all over the place to the Autodesk booth. It was wonderful to meet such diverse groups of people all delighting in the joys of 3D printing and making things.

 

Our troop of Peter the Penguins were especially popular!

 

Community Manager Andy Taylor showed some awesome live demos of Tinkercad, going with the theme of DC Comics - below you can see Peter the Penguin being transformed into The Flash!

 

Thanks to everyone for another great year! It was wonderful getting to meet so many of you, from educators to long time Autodesk users, and we can't wait to see you again next year.

123D Catch now on Android

123D Catch for Android is here!

Ever since we launched 123D Catch in late 2011, I've heard overwhelming requests from the Android community for a 123D Catch app compatible for their device. 

Today, I am happy to announce 123D CATCH FOR ANDROID IS HERE!!

See 123D Catch for Android on Google Play.

Its the first 123D app on Android by popular demand and compatible with most phones and tablets. So check it out!

 

Create captures on the go using your Android device, and edit them for 3D printing on your computer with Meshmixer.  All of your captures are saved in one place on your account at 123dapp.com.

 

Lets Talk About 3D Printing – On #3DThursday

Adafruit #3DThursday

Back on the 4th of July we featured two super-users Noe and Pedro Ruiz of Adafruit.  Well, they're back with another sweet project: this 3D printed case for the new RaspberryPi B+ that they designed in one of our 3D modeling apps: 123D Design.  Check it out below.

You can check out the full project, see more pics and download the native 123D Design files.
Want the files for 3D Printing or the alternate smiley faceplate?
You can check out their video about it and links to instructions

If you're interested in knowing more about how it was 3D modeled (or about the Raspberry Pi in general) you can ask them yourself, LIVE during their regular #3DTHURSDAY Google+ hangout.  It's where they talk about cool things that they've made for 3D Printing or that they've found on the web in places like Instructables.com.  It's every Thursday at 3PM EST (noon PST) learn more about how to join or click the top banner.  Don't be shy, we'll be there too.  Pop-in, ask your questions or share your knowledge about 3D printing projects!

 

123D Users Kristina and Sebastian’s Felt Vase

123D Make users Kristina Larsen and Sebastian Martin are the 123D Featured Users for the week... they're also part of the Instructables Artists in Residence program AND they've worked at San Francisco's world-renowned science museum, The Exploratorium.  Talk about impressive resumes, these two are destined for greatness.  

The project of theirs that caught our attention is this beautiful, soft and fuzzy (yet surprisingly sturdy) vase.

felt vase

What's really great about this project is that it can be replicated by anyone.  Autodesk provides free software to make it all possible, you just need a little patience while you cut the felt.

Kristina and Sebastian used Autodesk's Fusion 360 to design the vase's 3D model.  While Fusion 360 is an extremely powerful 3D modeling tool we thought this was a perfect opportunity to reproduce a very similar 3D model in Tinkercad, and here's what we got in 5 just minutes: link to model.

The left side shows the egg and two shapes we used as "holes" to flatten the bottom and carve out the hole for the glass vase in the top.  The right side shows we then selected "download for 3D printing" to get the model to open in 123D Make...

vase in tinkercad

And here's a screenshot showing 123D Make slicing the vase.

There's a lot more information in two Instructables written about this project, we link to them at the bottom of this page.  We also asked the pair a couple questions about why this project and why 123D Make...

123D: Why this project?
K&S: Part of what we’re doing in our Instructables residency is experimenting with different techniques, with the intention of incorporating those discoveries into our fabrication repertoire. We like to let the inherent properties or characteristics of materials inform our work so will push on things to see what they do when treated in different ways. Early on we hit on the idea of using the waterjet to cut very thick, dense wool felt which is normally used for industrial applications.

Felt is such an amazing material, and has physical properties unlike anything else, but when you cut wool felt with a laser it smells really terrible, like burned hair, and then the smell is really hard to remove. Plus you really can’t cut dense ½” thick felt with a laser. Waterjet cutting seemed a viable alternative, potentially clearing a path to digital fabrication using big sheets of this material. The result is even better than we imagined -- the cut edge is nice and crisp, and there’s a really satisfying tension between the machined quality of those edges and the overall softness of the material.  People can’t tell what the vase is made of when they first see it, and are nicely surprised once they figure it out.

We used the simple vase shape for our first experiment to give the project some clear constraints, since there was a lot about the process that was unknown to us. Now that we’ve seen how it works and how the material behaves we can confidently incorporate the technique into the creation of more complex sculptural objects. This way the risk and experimentation lies more in anticipating the aesthetic impact of the final piece, and less in unexpected variables in construction. We’re working on a piece inspired by topography and geology, where the layered construction will reference subsurface geologic structures, and the felt will take on the kind of soft, sculpted forms you'd expect from wool, in addition to showing the machined edge featured in the vase.

123D: What brought you to use 123D Make?
K&S: When we started this project I figured we’d have to draw the individual slices after building a form in (Autodesk) Fusion 360 software, but then discovered the slice-generating feature in 123D Make. 123D Make’s ability to quickly generate slices of any form, for any thickness of material, is such an exciting and powerful feature. 123D Make draws the slices in real time so you can play with different angles, and it simultaneously shows you how much material you’ll need to complete the project. In combination with laser, waterjet, or other computer-controlled cutting technologies it opens up whole realms of possibility for generating three-dimensional structures. Really, the only limitation is that you have to use a material that comes in a sheet.

Awesome!  To find out more about Kristaina Larsen and Sebastian Martin - check out these links: the Project387 Blog, their web site Cloudear.com, and their two instructables on this project: Layered Felt Vase, and Cutting Felt with Water.

Would you like to be a featured user?  Apply here.  Thanks Kristina and Sebastian!

 

 

 

 

Get Yourself Featured on 123D !

Do you like checking out the 123D Featured Users but feel like it's missing a little... "you"?   Fill out the form below and you could be the next Featured User!   The most interesting projects might just wind up here, or even on the screens of our apps.  What are you waiting for ?!?!  Hit the read more link.

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Sean Cusack’s Fire-Roasted Heart

123D user and master fabricator Sean Cusack may have a heart of gold, but in this instance he's here to melt hearts... Hearts made of half-inch (~12 mm) steel.  So don't get to close, this one's going to be hot!


What you're looking at is a welded steel heart, suspended by chains over a 12 million BTU, propane burning hot air balloon burner.  I bet you can guess what that does : turn steel red hot!

Sean says if the burner was left on long enough the steel would completely melt.  Sounds pretty cool, but we're also interested in how it was made.  Sean started with a simple 3D model of a heart (like this example, free on the 123D gallery), sliced it in half with MeshMixer, and used 123D Make to turn the remaining half-heart into slices that fit together nicely before welding.


Below is the half-heart before and after in 123D Make.  What looks like a complex 3D structure of interwoven slices was generated by 123D Make with just a few clicks.  You can download Sean's 3D Models and the sliced 123D Make from the 123D Project Gallery here's the link!

Hit the Read More link to see the process... Read more »

Featured User : Bryan Perry Keeps It Level

We have a saying in English about being 'up a creek without a paddle'.  What that means is: you're in deep trouble and there's no way out.  Well, 123D Circuits user Bryan Perry's pump station monitor circuitry is built to prevent such a situation - because it's all about keeping the levels of water (or whatever's in the tank) within safe levels.

When we found out a 123D Circuits user was designing something that's part of a modern civic infrastructure we just had to feature him.  It's this kind of circuit that keeps cities from flooding in winter and reservoirs at proper levels year-round.

In a nutshell here's how they work: There's a water storage tank underground.  Inside are three floats at different levels.  When water rises it makes the bottom float rise, then the middle float.  When this happens the circuit tells a pump to move some water out of the tank and thus lower the level of water.  When the water drops below the first two floats the circuit then tells the pump to turn off.  All good, BUT if the water was rising so fast the third float rises the circuit will turn on the second pump.  For an interactive breadboard simulation where you can click on the "floats" - check out this extra circuit Bryan made.


In the picture above the two blue clips can detect current flowing through a wire and are how the circuit can tell if the pumps are actually running or not.  If they're not running when they're supposed to the circuit will send Bryan a text (see the Sprint box, that's what that's for). The black cylinder is a backup 5V battery and the green terminal blocks on Bryan's circuit connect to the pumps and floats.  The microcontroller on the board is a SPARK CORE.
The board below was designed in 123D Circuits.
Bryan pressed the "Order" button and 10 days later the PCBs arrived. 

Click the Read More button to continue and see Bryan's circuit embedded in the blog!   Read more »

123D’s Newest Maker

Did you notice the new byline? Perhaps you did a double-take? By now you’re probably wondering, who is this new author on the Autodesk 123D blog?

Allow me to introduce myself. I’m Deena - the Autodesk 123D summer intern. Join me for the next ten weeks as I embark on a deep journey of self-discovery through 3D printing… Overdramatic, but you understand.

As a self-proclaimed “maker,” I’ve delighted in the realm of fabrication, trying my hand at photography, printmaking, typography, and film. However, I have never 3D printed, and am quite excited at the prospect of 3D design and execution.

For those of you just starting with 3D printing, I invite you to join in my beginner’s experience. For those of you who avidly read the 123D blog, I’m sure you’re already far ahead of me and will delight in my inevitable misadventures, reminiscing a time when you too were a fledgling maker in the 3D world.

Having that said, I can’t wait to get #START3D. I'll be sharing my journey with you each week here on the 123D blog.

Keep your eyes peeled for my next blog post, in which I will document my introduction to 3D printing through a new lens… Literally.

 

Thiago Hersan puts the Mega in MegaFone

Featured User Banner Have you ever wanted to project a message over loudspeaker, but do it remotely?  123D Circuits user Thiago Hersan and his fellow Instructables Artist-In-Residence Radames Ajna have built it - and a lot more.  Not only does their project, called "Fofoque-me: Vox Populi" project your voice over a motorized megaphone, but you can send it an SMS that will be translated to voice and that too will played aloud to curious bystanders.

Featured User Banner

 In the above picture check out the purple motor-driver board on top of the Arduino Mega -- that was designed in 123D Circuits.  Check out a video of three MegaFones during testing.

The motor drivers get a thorough testing.


To see the full system in action...

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