123D Make (Love)

We've seen some really great usage of 123D Make this week! While most folks are constrained to a relatively small scale, with desktop CNC or lasers at a local TechShop, we found some artists and designers who are pushing their creations to human scale (and beyond).

                              

First, we got an email from down under: Georgia Morgan in Broome, Australia, has made a full-scale figure from 3mm steel using 123D Make.  It's a pretty elegant use of the radial slicing feature, and we're so honored to have been a part of it!

 

Over in Europe, Lana Awad teamed up with Fab Textiles and FabLab Barcelona to create "Rig", a life-size mannequin that was showcased at Fab10 in July.  


From Fab Textiles: "The design for RIG is an exploration into the creative potential of mannequins as tools for exhibiting and work with. RIG is a manifestation on how tools should be rethought, redesigned, and reimagined..."  We couldn't agree more, and we love seeing such an ambitious use of the 123D tools.


Perhaps the most impressive, in terms of scale... while installing our Autodesk Gallery Pop-Up in Paris, the team stopped by the Paris Auto Show and saw a giant elephant cut from cardboard!  

I know there are others out there joining their massive radial slices together!  What did we miss?

 

123D Users Kristina and Sebastian’s Felt Vase

123D Make users Kristina Larsen and Sebastian Martin are the 123D Featured Users for the week... they're also part of the Instructables Artists in Residence program AND they've worked at San Francisco's world-renowned science museum, The Exploratorium.  Talk about impressive resumes, these two are destined for greatness.  

The project of theirs that caught our attention is this beautiful, soft and fuzzy (yet surprisingly sturdy) vase.

felt vase

What's really great about this project is that it can be replicated by anyone.  Autodesk provides free software to make it all possible, you just need a little patience while you cut the felt.

Kristina and Sebastian used Autodesk's Fusion 360 to design the vase's 3D model.  While Fusion 360 is an extremely powerful 3D modeling tool we thought this was a perfect opportunity to reproduce a very similar 3D model in Tinkercad, and here's what we got in 5 just minutes: link to model.

The left side shows the egg and two shapes we used as "holes" to flatten the bottom and carve out the hole for the glass vase in the top.  The right side shows we then selected "download for 3D printing" to get the model to open in 123D Make...

vase in tinkercad

And here's a screenshot showing 123D Make slicing the vase.

There's a lot more information in two Instructables written about this project, we link to them at the bottom of this page.  We also asked the pair a couple questions about why this project and why 123D Make...

123D: Why this project?
K&S: Part of what we’re doing in our Instructables residency is experimenting with different techniques, with the intention of incorporating those discoveries into our fabrication repertoire. We like to let the inherent properties or characteristics of materials inform our work so will push on things to see what they do when treated in different ways. Early on we hit on the idea of using the waterjet to cut very thick, dense wool felt which is normally used for industrial applications.

Felt is such an amazing material, and has physical properties unlike anything else, but when you cut wool felt with a laser it smells really terrible, like burned hair, and then the smell is really hard to remove. Plus you really can’t cut dense ½” thick felt with a laser. Waterjet cutting seemed a viable alternative, potentially clearing a path to digital fabrication using big sheets of this material. The result is even better than we imagined -- the cut edge is nice and crisp, and there’s a really satisfying tension between the machined quality of those edges and the overall softness of the material.  People can’t tell what the vase is made of when they first see it, and are nicely surprised once they figure it out.

We used the simple vase shape for our first experiment to give the project some clear constraints, since there was a lot about the process that was unknown to us. Now that we’ve seen how it works and how the material behaves we can confidently incorporate the technique into the creation of more complex sculptural objects. This way the risk and experimentation lies more in anticipating the aesthetic impact of the final piece, and less in unexpected variables in construction. We’re working on a piece inspired by topography and geology, where the layered construction will reference subsurface geologic structures, and the felt will take on the kind of soft, sculpted forms you'd expect from wool, in addition to showing the machined edge featured in the vase.

123D: What brought you to use 123D Make?
K&S: When we started this project I figured we’d have to draw the individual slices after building a form in (Autodesk) Fusion 360 software, but then discovered the slice-generating feature in 123D Make. 123D Make’s ability to quickly generate slices of any form, for any thickness of material, is such an exciting and powerful feature. 123D Make draws the slices in real time so you can play with different angles, and it simultaneously shows you how much material you’ll need to complete the project. In combination with laser, waterjet, or other computer-controlled cutting technologies it opens up whole realms of possibility for generating three-dimensional structures. Really, the only limitation is that you have to use a material that comes in a sheet.

Awesome!  To find out more about Kristaina Larsen and Sebastian Martin - check out these links: the Project387 Blog, their web site Cloudear.com, and their two instructables on this project: Layered Felt Vase, and Cutting Felt with Water.

Would you like to be a featured user?  Apply here.  Thanks Kristina and Sebastian!

 

 

 

 

Get Yourself Featured on 123D !

Do you like checking out the 123D Featured Users but feel like it's missing a little... "you"?   Fill out the form below and you could be the next Featured User!   The most interesting projects might just wind up here, or even on the screens of our apps.  What are you waiting for ?!?!  Hit the read more link.

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Maker of the Day – Domenic di Giorgio (Day 31)

 

 

Domenic di Giorgio

Why I make

When I look at something that interests me my first thought is always  "How could I make that?"

It becomes a challenge and an exciting chance to learn something. A new technique or material or technology.

Recently I have become obsessed with making tools to help makers make more. In particular a low-cost laser cutter/engraver. I enjoy watching makers take tools and use them in ways they were never imagined to be used in.

Very inspiring.

 

What I make

These days with the tools we (makers) have available to us, I can say that I make "Whatever I want to" 

I started making gliders and planes out of balsa and tissue paper when I was young and my need to make things grew and grew.. Now I use composite materials, cnc machines, 3d printers and laser cutters! Times and technology may have changed, but the feeling of having made something from start to finish never changes. 

I enjoy experimenting with cad, electronics, programming, robotics as well as getting my hands dirty on a lathe or mill.

I make things that capture my interests. 3d printed arduino controlled robotic arms, useless-machines in Pringles cans, tools to help me make more things. 

Too much to make and just not enough time!

 

 

Maker of the Day – Timothy Englert (Day 30)

 

 

Timothy Englert

Why I make

We are a society increasingly distancing itself from actual hands-on making of objects.  When I was a boy, everyone took shop class, and made a box, a bread basket, a cutting board, or a pencil holder as their first piece.  Our great-randfathers built their own homes, and a toolbox was as indispensable then as a computer is now.  

 The Knickerbocker Bench is my effort to reconnect people with the simple beauty of a handmade object, one that they can sometimes participate in the making of a permanent installation at a park.  I make them for private sale, but I also make them with groups of people, using traditional tools like two-man saws, hand planes, and scraper blades alongside band saw and chain saw mills.  Log benches connect us to the earth in an unique way, and the Knickerbocker Bench is as much an invitation to slow down and appreciate the beauty that surrounds us as it is a functional and durable piece of furniture.  I make them because people respond to them, and I make them because they remind me of the curious and indispensable role that trees play as the lungs of the world.  There's lots of other reasons, but these are a few.

What I make

I make the Knickerbocker Bench.  I created it in 2007 as a gift to one of New York's many beautiful state parks to recognize the natural ice harvesting industry that once took place at the site.  The design is a 21st Century homage to mankind's first piece of furniture, the log bench.   I've made them in a variety of woods, most of them coming from reclaimed logs found in the woods or from tree services.  Since the first ones were made for the ruins of the ice houses, we've since made just under 100 more, most of them in parks or on trails in the Hudson Valley, but some also in the midwest.  As no two trees are alike, no two Knickerbocker Benches are the same, as well.  

 

 

Maker of the Day – Gerry Paquette (Day 29)

 

 

Gerry Paquette

Why I make

I teach board game design in a Game Development program at Algonquin college in Ottawa. The college Print Shop recently invested in 3D printers and I encourage my students to make use of it by creating custom bits for their games. As first-year students, most of them haven't had any training using 3D software. Tinkercad is the ideal entry-level tool that does not overwhelm it's users with options. In fact, limited options allows for a more creative approach to design. 

Once the students have sent me their models in .STL format, I'm able to preview them in Tinkercad and make modifications in terms of sizing and thickening elements that are likely to break before sending them on to be printed. 

What I make

I use Tinkercad to make custom board game components primarily. Recently I used it to create a flea circus as part of my costume for local Steampunk 5 year anniversary gala. 

My current project, Battle Cubed, is a tactical 3- dimensional space fighting game that features 3D printed ships and a 2D stand with platforms that are laser cut out of acrylic and assembled into a 3-tiered playing surface.

 

 

Maker of the Day – Emmanuel Di Giacomo (Day 28)

 

 

Emmanuel Di Giacomo

Why I make

I am an Architect by training and I have always been crazy of Utopy in Architecture. I was also a former alumni of Paul Maymont, a famous French Architect and Utopist of the 60ies.I designed and drew my first architectural creations when I was 15. The Story became even stronger when I used my first 3D Software in 1989 on a Mac. I then fell in love with Revit and decided to continue the Utopic Story by giving life to the Utopic City. 

What I make

I design and create a Revit Utopic City in 3D based on the map of famous cities like Roma and Milan. It's made of hundreds of crazy and nice buildings and infrastructures, a completely imaginary and complex world that more than 93,600 Facebook lovers follow in the world. It allows also to show the creative power of a BIM tool like Revit.

 

 

Maker of the Day – Scott Kildall (Day 27)

 

 

Scott Kildall

Why I make

Creative energy sustains me and by making physical things, I transform thoughts into form. I view new technologies as an opportunity to experiment with possibilities that is completely new, but pays homage to older traditions. 

The data crystals reflect this transformation from virtual into material using technology that wasn't available 10 years ago.

What I make

Data Crystals are a series of 3D-printed sculptures, which I generate algorithmically from various data sources. These manifest a vision of what data physically looks like — one possibility for 3D data visualization.

My source for the data crystals range from city-provided open datasets such as construction permit and crime statistics to biometric data generated by human bodies such as physical movement or EEG (brainwaves) data. 

I see data as sculptural material, like clay, plaster or steel. By using code to transform columns of numbers into 3D models, I call myself a “data miner,” where I extract data into small gems. I’m still experimenting with legibility and aesthetics. The primary question that drives this work is the question of “what does data look like?” 

 

 

Maker of the Day – Max Gunawan (Day 26)

 

 

Max Gunawan

Why I make

Inspired by the idea of an illuminated book, it is designed to have intuitive functionality. Simply open the cover to turn it on, the further you open the cover the brighter it gets. It packs eight hours of rechargeable battery life and can be easily recharged through a micro USB port. 

Lumio is the first product from a studio dedicated to helping people live large with less. The studio is focused on simple, multi-functional, everyday objects that are simple, intuitive and beautiful.
The Lumio brand creates modern lighting systems with the simple goal of giving people the freedom to experience beautiful lighting wherever they are.

What I make

Lumio is a modern portable lamp that unfolds from a book and can be transformed into multiple forms and functions. It has a minimalist design that combines laser-cut wood cover with durable water resistant Tyvek pages containing high performing LED. With a unique combination of transformable shape and concealed Neodymium magnets, you can personalize Lumio into endless configurations and mount it on almost any surface. Lumio provides you with an elegant lighting solution whether you're throwing an impromptu backyard party or reading a bedtime story to your kids. 

 

 Max is a TechShop user! Find out more about Lumio here.

 

Maker of the Day – Benjamin Delman (Day 24)

 

 

Benjamin Delman

Why I make

Making has found its way into all aspects of my life long ago. Whether that was building my first computer from parts, rebuilding a carburetor on a motor, deviating from a recipe in the kitchen, or building a website. I've found making something myself to be incredibly rewarding.

Naturally, when it came to giving gifts, I wanted to include that DIY attitude. Sometimes that was making the gift itself. This past December, it was just a small piece of the packaging. In all scenarios, it added that custom, personalized touch that leaves a lasting impression. 

What I make

December 2013, I had been taking a handful of classes at Autodesk's Pier 9. Rather than buying some gift tags off the shelf, I took the opportunity to use the laser cutters again and make my own. I found some Christmas themed vector art online, imported it into Illustrator, and tweaked it to fit the gift tag outline I had drawn. After adding some recipient names, these custom gift tags were ready to attach to a gift box with a little ribbon.