From the Makers: Tinkercad to 3D print!

Lining up at the gate for Maker Faire Rome 2014At the last couple of Maker Faire events, lots of people told us how they used Tinkercad for all their 3D printing. We're so honored to have such loyal users!   I thought I'd reflect here on some of the most popular features, in case some of you weren't aware.  Anything I missed? Screen Shot 2014-10-04 at 7.05.01 AM- Water-Tight STL files
Tinkercad is great as a last point of prep before sending a model to the printer.  The Import function can make the most stubborn files magically heal themselves, allowing you to re-export or add a solid base for stability.

 

Screen Shot 2014-10-04 at 6.52.07 AM - Direct to 3D print service capability.
A couple of clicks is all that stands between you and a full color print of your model (or Peter D. Penguin).  Just go to Design > Order a 3D Print.  

 

SVG Import
You can import a line drawing in an SVG file format to extrude right in Tinkercad (or even 123D Design).  

 

- Slicing a Larger Print for Sectional Printing.
We covered this in a recent TinkerTip, but using 2 boxes as holes allows you to keep a clean seam when breaking up a larger model into multiple prints.  

Fab10 Barcelona

 

Autodesk was pleased to be a primary sponsor and an award giver for the inaugural Fab Awards, at the 10th annual Fab Lab Conference in Barcelona, Spain. According to their website, "FAB10Barcelona is a one week series of events focused on open and accessible technologies that will change the world. It gathers the Fab Lab Network and the citizens of Barcelona to make it a FAB City." 

Competition was fierce with over 100 excellent submissions from dozens of countries!  Most projects included their source files, so you can even make them yourself: https://www.fab10.org/en/awards

Below you can see all of the winners:

Sénamé Koffi and his team of architects & engineers from Lomé, Togo. After buying a 3D printer for their new makerspace WoeLab, they looked around and realized they already had the parts to build their next 3D printing machine.

Every year, 515 tons of broken gadgets get shipped to West Africa, where young workers burn the equipment to salvage materials like gold and copper in a dangerously toxic environment. But there’s a lot of craft and engineering that goes into electronic components, all of which is wasted when things gets melted down for scrap.  WoeLab manager Dodji Honou says the members of WoeLab asked themselves, “how can we create something of our own using what we have around us?”

Using the frame of an old desktop computer, iron rails from discarded printers, and one new Arduino board, WoeLab member Afate Gnikou invented the W.Afate 3D printer—which won First Place in the Fab Awards.

“With an old thing and a good idea,” says Honou, “you can make a solution.”

 

Second prize went to another new idea inspired by old electronics: the Ag Inkjet Circuit (AgIC) was developed by Yoshihiro Kawahara from the University of Tokyo, in collaboration with Microsoft Research Cambridge and Georgia Institute of Technology. "Ag" is the chemical symbol for silver, and this brilliant invention uses conductive silver ink to turn ordinary inkjet printers into circuit board manufacturers. To quote the AgIC website: “Say goodbye to breadboard.”

 

In third place we have the 3D Printed Prosthetics initiative at Fab Lab San Diego in California, USA, with Katie Rast presenting their innovative Gladius prosthetic leg design and their initiative to support 3D-printed hands.  Most prosthetic legs are specialized in their use so people require multiple prosthetics for different activities, but this new design provides an all-in-one solution for running or walking on different terrains.

3D printed prosthetics have an advantage over traditional designs because they are a fraction of the cost and they can easily be tailor-made. Initiatives like Fab Lab San Diego and eNABLE connect 3D printers to people who need prosthetic hands, while providing simple software for customizing hands to fit their users.

 

 

Autodesk had an award to present, and it went to the Waag Society’s inventive and customizable low-cost prosthesis. This prosthetic leg is a collaboration between Dutch and Indonesian designers, using locally-available materials like pineapple tree fibers and bamboo, a realistic alternative for people without access to MRI's and industrialized technology.

 

A popular vote awarded FabPonics from Puerto Rico the Audience Choice Prize. Their clever aquaponics design brings urban farming to the Caribbean, and uses digital fabrication to easily manufacture systems for incorporating fish tanks and water filtration into small farming modules.

Overall it was an amazing and inspiring event full of innovative people and brand new ideas. If you want to get involved in events like this, consider creating your own projects! You can even get started right here on 123D

Maker of the Day – Domenic di Giorgio (Day 31)

 

 

Domenic di Giorgio

Why I make

When I look at something that interests me my first thought is always  "How could I make that?"

It becomes a challenge and an exciting chance to learn something. A new technique or material or technology.

Recently I have become obsessed with making tools to help makers make more. In particular a low-cost laser cutter/engraver. I enjoy watching makers take tools and use them in ways they were never imagined to be used in.

Very inspiring.

 

What I make

These days with the tools we (makers) have available to us, I can say that I make "Whatever I want to" 

I started making gliders and planes out of balsa and tissue paper when I was young and my need to make things grew and grew.. Now I use composite materials, cnc machines, 3d printers and laser cutters! Times and technology may have changed, but the feeling of having made something from start to finish never changes. 

I enjoy experimenting with cad, electronics, programming, robotics as well as getting my hands dirty on a lathe or mill.

I make things that capture my interests. 3d printed arduino controlled robotic arms, useless-machines in Pringles cans, tools to help me make more things. 

Too much to make and just not enough time!

 

 

Maker of the Day – Gerry Paquette (Day 29)

 

 

Gerry Paquette

Why I make

I teach board game design in a Game Development program at Algonquin college in Ottawa. The college Print Shop recently invested in 3D printers and I encourage my students to make use of it by creating custom bits for their games. As first-year students, most of them haven't had any training using 3D software. Tinkercad is the ideal entry-level tool that does not overwhelm it's users with options. In fact, limited options allows for a more creative approach to design. 

Once the students have sent me their models in .STL format, I'm able to preview them in Tinkercad and make modifications in terms of sizing and thickening elements that are likely to break before sending them on to be printed. 

What I make

I use Tinkercad to make custom board game components primarily. Recently I used it to create a flea circus as part of my costume for local Steampunk 5 year anniversary gala. 

My current project, Battle Cubed, is a tactical 3- dimensional space fighting game that features 3D printed ships and a 2D stand with platforms that are laser cut out of acrylic and assembled into a 3-tiered playing surface.

 

 

Maker of the Day – Andy Lee (Day 25)

 

 

Andy Lee

Why I make

I've always made stuff. It's an exploration i've been on for a long time. I am interested in how everything is made. All things from how is steel forged to how are silicone etched and packaged or how does a designer decide what the visual details they might add to their products.

Making stuff leads me on these journeys where I discover new ways that things can be made and built. 

What I make

Most of the things I make are tools for living. I've made lines of furniture and household accessories. I've been interested in robotics for a long time. In 2008 I made my own 3D printer in my apartment on my kitchen table. Everyone asked if they needed 3D goggles.

I made a chess board that had a gantry with a magnet underneath the board. It could adjust the magnet and move the pieces around. There was an RFID reader which could read tags that we placed in the base of the pieces. 

Right now I am exploring aperiodic stacking patterns of polyhedrons.

See more of Andy's work at http://5cell.net/

 

Maker of the Day – Meredith Sheff-King (Day 22)

 

Meredith Sheff-King

Why I make

Because machines are beautiful, and craftsmanship is wonderful. Because I like to see how many different ways we can interact with the world around us. I love moving elements from one genre, practice, or industry to another. I want the machinists to hang out with the quilters, the programmers to hang out with the cartoonists, the woodworkers to build stuff with the hardware nerds. Wouldn't that be beautiful? Imagine all the things we could build! 

What I make

Machines! Textiles! Large scale things that we burn down! Lots of little flexible electronics. Mixing craft-type- stuff with machine-type-stuff. Things that make funny noises when you poke them. Comic books. Magical interactions. I like to work with materials and mechanisms outside their regular genre; machine schematics into quilts, implanting books with RFIDs to trigger reactions, electronics into clothing. 

 

Maker of the Day – Thiago Hersan (Day 21)

Thiago Hersan

Why I make

It helps me think about things and it helps me communicate things about thoughts.

What I make

Installations and apps that deal with mediated spaces in human-human communication; why we communicate, and how. 

Maker of the Day – Zachary Vorhies (Day 20)

Zachary Vorhies

Why I make

I love making wearable fashion! I've always had an interest in the clothes people would make for Burning Man, the most fantastic place on earth (for that week).

One year I met a fashion designer, Wheylan Dean-Ford, who makes costumes for rockstars and movies. He ended up crashing at my house after Burning Man and we got to talking about fashion. He was struggling with putting electronics into his outfits and since I love electronics, I was more than able to help him out. That got us to talking about my own outfit that I wanted to create. The idea that I had was to do a mashup of a glow stick and a CamelBak so we created this thing that called the Hydropak, which is like a CamelBak, but glows to the sound of music.

The Hydropak outfit was a really big hit with my friends and so I started wearing it all the time. One time I wore it to a fashion show and the organizer snapped a picture of me and said, "Who made this amazing outfit?" and I was like, "I did!" He responded, "Why don't you make five more like this and I'll put it on the fashion runway?" 

So I called my designer friend who was living in New York and said, "Hey, want to fly to San Francisco and help me make five outfits for this fashion show?" He was like, "Okay!" So we did it. 

The following week we started a massive one month work session creating five fashion pieces. One of these pieces was the Turn Signal Glove which you can see at: www.futuretechwear.com 

When we showed off the gloves, the response was overwhelming: "YOU MUST MAKE MORE OF THESE TURN SIGNAL GLOVES!" 

So from there on out I was on a mission to create the best cycling glove in the world. I said goodbye to my job at Google and said hello to the wonderful world of entrepreneurship, and the rest is history. 

What I make

Turn Signal Gloves - www.zackees.com
Kickstarter and made $72.5k in sales in just 30 days. CNET said that they were “...enough to encourage a new era of turn signal use.” 

Lightup Outfits - www.futuretechwear.com These are some outfits I created to showcase my talent. 

LED Piano - https://www.youtube.com/watch? v=5V2d0_P9cLo

I designed the electronics and built the software. The fabrication of the piano was carried out by the artist, William Jerome, who also uses it in his performances in his band, Interstellar Transmissions. 

Maker of the Day – Amanda Jackson (Day 16)

Amanda Jackson

Amanda Jackson

Why I make

I developed an interest in art as soon as I could hold a pencil or paintbrush. I had some difficulties at school with Expressive Language Disorder so drawing was an alternative way too express myself other than talking, although this has improved with time. I am open to different art mediums and styles, whether it be traditional or digital work, so when I learnt of the 123D creature app I jumped at the chance to try out some 3D sculpting. I am always trying to improve my work and willing to learn new things so I have grown too enjoy the app, using it as another art tool and have become quite addicted to it!

What I make

When i am not working on any illustrations or paintings i enjoy using the 123D Creature App to create models of characters and creatures from video games, films, books and mythology. Other subjects I create are usually animals or creatures/characters from my own imagination. I believe I have just over 200 3D models at the moment. I am an aspiring illustrator so my work usually consists of acrylic, watercolour paintings and ink drawings. My next project is to create some illustrations for Jack London's 'Call of the Wild' and I was thinking of creating a series of models that can be printed in 3D using the 123D Creature App. If you would like to have a quick look at some of my other work you can visit my website http://amandajackson101.wix.com/illustrator or my deviantart page  -  http://amanda-jackson.deviantart.com/

Maker of the Day – Eric Jacobson (Day 15)

Eric Jacobson

Why I make

I make because I enjoy creating something physical and lasting. The bronze age and the iron age created objects that have endured the test of time. So much of the digital age is ephemeral - my goal is to take the tools of the digital age and use them to make art that can tell the story of this era for ages to come.

What I make

I make sculpture! I love combining modern design techniques (3d models, digital fabrication, vector design software) with traditional foundry techniques to create unique sculptures. My favorite medium is cast iron because of its connection to the industrial age and then modernized through my techniques.

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