Adafruit’s 3D Printed Retro Mari Clouds

Adafruit #3DThursday

123D Superstar users Noe and Pedro Ruiz of Adafruit Industries are back with another awesome 3D printing + electronics hybrid project - and they've published the files on our site with instructions.  


You can watch these guys whip up 3D printed projects LIVE every 3D Thursday, but today we've posted this great video their latest project.  Scroll down for everything you need to build it yourself!

Check out Adafruit's detailed instruction page for the step-by-step instructions and links to their electronics shop.


The "Mari Clouds"  enclosure was modeled in our free 3D modeling software called 123D Design (click to download).  You can find the original design files and ready-to-3D print files on the Mari Clouds Project Page on our site, 123Dapp.com.  While you're there check out Adafruit's other awesome projects on 123Dapp.com.


We love talking about Noe and Pedro's projects.  If you have something you'd like us to feature just drop us your info at our get-featured page!

Making a Super Nintendo USB case with Tinkercad

 

One of the greatest aspects of the holidays, birthdays, and other special events is the opportunity to give someone a meaningful gift. Tinkercad user Matt Mustarde was faced with the question of what to get his younger brother for his 13th birthday, an age that is considered a milestone for many people. Matt, a Washington State University student, took to Tinkercad and applied his mind towards solving the problem of what to get his brother.

Armed with a standard 32GB flashdrive, a Printrbot+, and Tinkercad, Matt designed a USB case shaped like an Super Nintendo (SNES) controller, knowing his brother is a huge fan of video games. Matt also went the extra step and pre-loaded the flashdrive with lots of games for his brother to play.

I had a chance to speak with Matt to learn more about his creative process:

"I really just wanted to make something special for my brother! He loves computer games but has a crappy laptop so I figured I'd aggregate the best games and put it on a cool custom drive. The actual designing took about a day, I used an actual SNES controller and made a vector of it to get the profile just right. That's why I used Tinkercad, because it's so convenient for importing vectors and making simple models."

 

When I asked Matt about his history with 3D printing, he told me, "I've been printing for about 2 years now, originally on my robotics team's printer. I bought a Printrbot+ kit back in February and love it. Basically I'm just a student with a hobby and love sharing my work." And of course, in true Maker fashion, Matt has been kind enough to share his design with the community through Thingiverse

This is the kind of story we love to hear, where 3D design and printing inspires creativity in people and they share it with the world. Thanks to Matt for sharing your experience with us - we can't wait to see what you do next!