Rockets and Robots: exploring STEM education with 123D

April is a big month for rockets and robots, and for STEM education in general. Here at the Autodesk 123D world headquarters, we are pleased to provide you with tools and project ideas that will help you explore this field.

Coming up first is Yuri's Night, a celebration of the first manned flight into space, on April 12th. We have an extensive collection of 3D rocket models in the 123D Gallery, and we've gathered them together for your convenience. Check out some of them below. You can download them, change them, 3D print them and share them with your friends. Stay tuned for tutorials on how you can use 123D Design, Tinkercad and Meshmixer to make some great things.

Soon after that, two major competitive robotics events are coming up, both from April 23-26: The VEX Robotics World Championship in Anaheim, California; and the FIRST Robotics Competition in St. Louis Missouri. We'll be publishing simple robotics projects to get you started in this field, integrating electronics and 3D printing.

You can also find some great 3D models of robots in the 123D Gallery - we've packaged up some of them, but feel free to go exploring: there are a lot more! Use them as a starting point for some fun projects.

Keep checking back, for fun and easy projects you can do, and a surprise guest!

123D Circuits Contest Closes Tonight!

Just a few hours to go until the Instructables 123D Circuits contest closes!  If you haven’t already, check out the great entries so far and cast your votes for the winners.  Better yet, go to 123D Circuits and create your own entry, the prizes are AWESOME (like, oscilloscope awesome). 

There is still time! It’s free to design circuits, and you can get started with your 123D account.  We’ve certainly got our favorite entries, what are yours?

3D Printed Robotic Dinosaurs!

Something very neat is happening at Drexel University - dinosaur bones are being scanned and then 3D printed! Dr. James Tangorra and Dr. Kenneth Lacovara have teamed up along with other researchers to get this project going.

The dinosaur bones will be printed both at normal size (for display in museums) and on a smaller scale. The smaller scale bones will be assembled into full skeletons and then turned into robots so that the researchers will be able to study how the dinosaurs really moved. The doctors hope to have a robotic limb created by the end of 2012 - a full model will take much longer.

3D printing has really revolutionized the field of paleontology - I can't wait to see where this goes.

Via drexel.edu