White House 3D Printed Ornament Contest!


When you’ve got a big house to decorate for the holidays, advanced planning is wise. So naturally, the White House is already thinking about this year’s holiday decor, and we're going to help them deck their halls. Instructables is excited to partner with the Smithsonian and the White House in this 3D Printed Ornament Challenge. Some of the winners of this challenge will have their work printed and hung in the East Wing of the White House during the holiday season. Additionally, those selected to be displayed at the White House will be featured on the Smithsonian’s state of the art 3D data platform, 3d.si.edu and will join a small collection of White House ornaments in the political history division of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History.

You don’t need to have a 3D printer to participate — design an ornament with any 3D modeling software and up to 8 winning designs will be 3D printed and shipped to the White House for you. New to 3D modeling? No sweat! Head over to Tinkercad and play around with making 3-dimensional shapes. It’s really fun, and you’ll learn an awesome new skill, to boot. This is your chance to make White House history and have your art featured in their first-ever maker challenge.

The model should be no larger than 3”x 3” and reflect the magic and wonder of the holidays, so think ornaments that represent winter sports, toys, activities, symbols, and anything that inspires you during the festive winter season. Want to incorporate a little twinkle to your designs as well? Design a piece that fits or clips onto a string of lights!

To qualify, you must be a U.S. resident and create an Instructable for your ornament — and be sure to include the .stl file!  Click HERE for more info.

From the Makers: Tinkercad to 3D print!

Lining up at the gate for Maker Faire Rome 2014At the last couple of Maker Faire events, lots of people told us how they used Tinkercad for all their 3D printing. We're so honored to have such loyal users!   I thought I'd reflect here on some of the most popular features, in case some of you weren't aware.  Anything I missed? Screen Shot 2014-10-04 at 7.05.01 AM- Water-Tight STL files
Tinkercad is great as a last point of prep before sending a model to the printer.  The Import function can make the most stubborn files magically heal themselves, allowing you to re-export or add a solid base for stability.

 

Screen Shot 2014-10-04 at 6.52.07 AM - Direct to 3D print service capability.
A couple of clicks is all that stands between you and a full color print of your model (or Peter D. Penguin).  Just go to Design > Order a 3D Print.  

 

SVG Import
You can import a line drawing in an SVG file format to extrude right in Tinkercad (or even 123D Design).  

 

- Slicing a Larger Print for Sectional Printing.
We covered this in a recent TinkerTip, but using 2 boxes as holes allows you to keep a clean seam when breaking up a larger model into multiple prints.  

Autodesk / Tinkercad win big at 3D Print Show Awards!

Thanks so much for everyone that voted in this year's 3D Print Show Awards!

We're so honored to have won Brand of the Year (Autodesk) and Best Online/App-Based Service (Tinkercad) and proud to have such a great community of designers, modelers and Tinkerers!

Congrats also to all the other winners - well deserved!

 

Join The Open Source Dress – Using Tinkercad

For anyone who follows Anouk Wipprecht or is just hearing about her infamous, interactive 3D printed dresses - This is a chance to add YOUR design sensibility to one of her couture-creations...  Anouk x Polaire will be assembling 3D printed "Particles" made by people all over the world - into a complete "Open Source Dress".  There is still time to send your particle.

On the left: some of the smaller prototype dress.  On the right: a particle sent in by a contributor.  


Anouk added LED rings to some of her own particles, using them as examples.

Here's more... check out what people are making on Tinkercad by filtering for #ParticleDress:

To participate is quite simple if you or a friend have a 3D printer.  The easiest way is to simply 3D print this existing part in Tinkercad or if you're the creative type : change that 3D model in Tinkercad so it has your own personal style - then send the print to:

THE OPEN SOURCE ELEMENT DRESS 
Anouk Wipprecht x Polaire 
Schottenfeldgasse 72/8c 
1070 Wien, Austria

*** For all the details --- Check out Anouk's Instructable ***


We took a little time out of our day and designed / 3D printed a couple particles.  Have a look:

Below left is our version of their base model, it will easily print on a Makerbot or similar 3D printer (click to Tinker-it). Below middle is the "spikey" particle you see above, and below right is the "balloon" particle" you see above in white.


You can start with the base model (might require support material) or our blue/orange version of the base model (you can change the colors) that will require no support material.

If you don't have a 3D printer you're not out of luck.  There are several professional companies eager to perfectly-print your models and we've got them lined up on our 3D-Print page.  

Hope to see your particles on the Open Source Dress!
-123D

123D Users Kristina and Sebastian’s Felt Vase

123D Make users Kristina Larsen and Sebastian Martin are the 123D Featured Users for the week... they're also part of the Instructables Artists in Residence program AND they've worked at San Francisco's world-renowned science museum, The Exploratorium.  Talk about impressive resumes, these two are destined for greatness.  

The project of theirs that caught our attention is this beautiful, soft and fuzzy (yet surprisingly sturdy) vase.

felt vase

What's really great about this project is that it can be replicated by anyone.  Autodesk provides free software to make it all possible, you just need a little patience while you cut the felt.

Kristina and Sebastian used Autodesk's Fusion 360 to design the vase's 3D model.  While Fusion 360 is an extremely powerful 3D modeling tool we thought this was a perfect opportunity to reproduce a very similar 3D model in Tinkercad, and here's what we got in 5 just minutes: link to model.

The left side shows the egg and two shapes we used as "holes" to flatten the bottom and carve out the hole for the glass vase in the top.  The right side shows we then selected "download for 3D printing" to get the model to open in 123D Make...

vase in tinkercad

And here's a screenshot showing 123D Make slicing the vase.

There's a lot more information in two Instructables written about this project, we link to them at the bottom of this page.  We also asked the pair a couple questions about why this project and why 123D Make...

123D: Why this project?
K&S: Part of what we’re doing in our Instructables residency is experimenting with different techniques, with the intention of incorporating those discoveries into our fabrication repertoire. We like to let the inherent properties or characteristics of materials inform our work so will push on things to see what they do when treated in different ways. Early on we hit on the idea of using the waterjet to cut very thick, dense wool felt which is normally used for industrial applications.

Felt is such an amazing material, and has physical properties unlike anything else, but when you cut wool felt with a laser it smells really terrible, like burned hair, and then the smell is really hard to remove. Plus you really can’t cut dense ½” thick felt with a laser. Waterjet cutting seemed a viable alternative, potentially clearing a path to digital fabrication using big sheets of this material. The result is even better than we imagined -- the cut edge is nice and crisp, and there’s a really satisfying tension between the machined quality of those edges and the overall softness of the material.  People can’t tell what the vase is made of when they first see it, and are nicely surprised once they figure it out.

We used the simple vase shape for our first experiment to give the project some clear constraints, since there was a lot about the process that was unknown to us. Now that we’ve seen how it works and how the material behaves we can confidently incorporate the technique into the creation of more complex sculptural objects. This way the risk and experimentation lies more in anticipating the aesthetic impact of the final piece, and less in unexpected variables in construction. We’re working on a piece inspired by topography and geology, where the layered construction will reference subsurface geologic structures, and the felt will take on the kind of soft, sculpted forms you'd expect from wool, in addition to showing the machined edge featured in the vase.

123D: What brought you to use 123D Make?
K&S: When we started this project I figured we’d have to draw the individual slices after building a form in (Autodesk) Fusion 360 software, but then discovered the slice-generating feature in 123D Make. 123D Make’s ability to quickly generate slices of any form, for any thickness of material, is such an exciting and powerful feature. 123D Make draws the slices in real time so you can play with different angles, and it simultaneously shows you how much material you’ll need to complete the project. In combination with laser, waterjet, or other computer-controlled cutting technologies it opens up whole realms of possibility for generating three-dimensional structures. Really, the only limitation is that you have to use a material that comes in a sheet.

Awesome!  To find out more about Kristaina Larsen and Sebastian Martin - check out these links: the Project387 Blog, their web site Cloudear.com, and their two instructables on this project: Layered Felt Vase, and Cutting Felt with Water.

Would you like to be a featured user?  Apply here.  Thanks Kristina and Sebastian!

 

 

 

 

Get Yourself Featured on 123D !

Do you like checking out the 123D Featured Users but feel like it's missing a little... "you"?   Fill out the form below and you could be the next Featured User!   The most interesting projects might just wind up here, or even on the screens of our apps.  What are you waiting for ?!?!  Hit the read more link.

Read more »

The Mighty Midwest Presents: The Chicago Public Library

 

This week in the Mighty Midwest we take a look at how 3D printing is changing the way visitors experience their local public library. Libraries have always existed as repositories of learning and information, and as technologies change there is a huge opportunity for them to adapt and bring those technologies to the masses. The Chicago Public Library has set up a Maker Lab in their downtown branch to bring new technologies to the people of Chicago. In the video below you can see how this Maker Lab is transforming the library experience by bringing things like 3D modeling and 3D printing, laser cutting, and more to the average person.

The Mighty Midwest presents: Tom Burtonwood

 

On this week's installment of the Mighty Midwest we have fan favorite, Tom Burtonwood. Tom is making great strides in showcasing Chicago as an epicenter of art and innovation. Tom, a Tinkercad and 123D Catch user, is an artist residing in Chicago, and he uses 3D scanning, 3D modeling, and 3D printing to transform the way we understand objects. Tom shares his knowledge of 3D printing in a number of capacities, including giving classes at the Art Institute of Chicago, teaching students at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and helping people new to the 3D printing at the Firecat Projects gallery. Tom also joined us in San Mateo for the Bay Area Maker Faire this last May. If you saw our video from last week then you got a little sneak peek of Tom's work.

Earlier this year we had the chance to visit him all over Chicago to see how Tom helps diverse groups of people understand this new 3D printing technology that's sweeping the nation.

 

Be sure to keep up with Tom's latest projects on his website and on his Thingiverse account. 

Multitouch Tinkercad and 123D Circuits for Windows

Have you heard the news?  The first releases of Tinkercad and 123D Circuits with multitouch just hit the Windows App Store!  Like their browser-based counterparts they're totally free and they'll run on any Windows 8.1 computer.

Let's dig into it!  Tinkercad for Windows 8.1 with multitouch now lets you Pan, Zoom, and Orbit with two fingers, which is as intuitive as it gets.  You can also drag, position and manipulate shapes just as you normally would with a mouse - now with a stylus too.

Check out this awesome hands-on video with Tinkercad:

Tinkercad with Multitouch

With 123D Circuits for Windows 8.1 you can now pan and zoom with your fingers and design and edit circuits with the stylus.  It's a great way to design using two hands and if you don't have a Windows 8.1 PC with a touchscreen or touchpad you can still download the apps and run them with a mouse as you would their browser counterparts.

Check out this video of 123D Circuits multitouch:

123D Circuits with Multitouch 

These are first-releases so if you have a Windows 8.1 PC and you use Tinkercad or 123D Circuits, we'd love to hear your feedback in the comments section below.

PINHOL3D: 3D printing through a new lens

 

The inspiration for my first project stems from a deep-rooted love for iPhone photography. While a number of phone apps exist for the sole purpose of photo manipulation, there are comparatively few hardware accessories that serve the same purpose. Recalling my days of haphazardly taping a pinholed-cardboard square to my iPhone camera, I envisioned my first 3D printing project achieving that same grainy, vignetting effect in hardware form. Enter my first project: the iPhone pinhole camera.

freshly-printed iPhone pinholes

My first attempt at the iPhone pinhole was only minorly successful. I modeled the device on Tinkercad, essentially slicing off two-thirds of an already-created iPhone 5 case, and adding a cylinder with a small opening over the camera area to create the pinhole. This took all of twenty minutes; it’s that easy.

I then printed it on one of the many Objet500 printers here at Pier 9, using the Tango Black material. While the produced model was workable, the material was too flimsy to comfortably sit on the iPhone. Moreover, the pinhole was slightly too far to the left and needed to be manually adjusted for each picture.

Thus, I returned to the drawing board (that is, Tinkercad). This time, I used iPhone specs detailed in Apple’s developer guide to locate the center of the camera. Using Tinkercad’s ruler feature, I easily plugged in the specified measurements and there it was — a complete second iteration in less than half an hour. Total insanity.

Honestly, the longest part of this process was waiting for a fellow Pier 9 shop user’s piece to finish printing so I could load my creation onto the Objet500. But after a mere hour of watching the printer lay down layer upon layer of model material, there it was — the material version of an idea that I’d conceived of 24 hours before this moment.

Excavating the model from its support materialHot off the object

Despite my immediate urge to test it out, I needed to dislodge the piece from its support material encasing — a process that I greatly underestimated. After half an hour of chiseling away at the support material with a power washer and a variety of ice-pick-resembling hand tools, there was my glistening iPhone pinhole camera.

So here — directly from my new pinhole camera to your screen — is the world of an Autodesk intern through a Tinkercad-created lens:

I also modeled a number of iterations, experimenting with the depth of the pinhole casing as well as the number and orientation of pinholes. Follow my instructable, print your own, and play around with your pinhole images on Pixlr for extra vintage-looking, instagram-able results.